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Old 06-02-2013, 01:56 PM
 
Location: Battle Creek, MI
494 posts, read 673,790 times
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Here is a map i came across with the election results by Congressional/county..


source of map..
Second Look At Electoral College Reform? The Greenroom
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Old 06-02-2013, 08:34 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 15,050,141 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jgn2013 View Post
All major Texas cities are "blue" because they have moderate to large numbers of educated, urban professionals that are diverse in terms of religion, sexual orientation, race and culture.

Heterogeneous cities and towns are more liberal than homogenous cities and towns. This doesn't translate to states because larger states like TX, have significant rural/homogenous (racially) populations that can offset voting patterns in urban areas.
I can see this being the case with Austin, but I doubt 18-29 y/o hipsters and yuppies are the primary reason Dallas and Harris county go blue. Harris county has went red in the recent past - for Bush in 2004.
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Old 06-03-2013, 05:30 AM
 
567 posts, read 911,424 times
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I was mainly wondering what it's like in terms of statewide politics, how 'upstaters' view/treat the city in question, and vice versa.

Las Vegas was kinda in that situation. The rest of Nevada's deep red, but of the western libertarian type rather than the Bible Belt type. While there was plenty of animosity, it was mostly about fiscal issues and water/land/mineral rights as opposed to anyone carping about moral degeneracy or whatever. There's just as many drunks, gambling addicts, and godless atheists up in those little towns as there is down in Vegas. And they have the legal brothels, whereas Vegas doesn't.

There are also some weird state political dynamics at play. Most the population (70%+) as well as most the money are concentrated in Las Vegas, but most the state political power is "up north." The legislature is part time, and the capital's way the hell up in Carson City which is an 8 hour drive from Vegas, so if you're a state politician in Vegas who also has a day job, a family, or a business, there's a great deal going against you because of the distance. People quit earlier than they would, whereas up north it's not as much of a problem, so up north the state politicians accumulate more seniority. It ends up being a giant screw job and that's how they (up north) like it.
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Old 06-03-2013, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,509 posts, read 28,180,477 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
I can see this being the case with Austin, but I doubt 18-29 y/o hipsters and yuppies are the primary reason Dallas and Harris county go blue. Harris county has went red in the recent past - for Bush in 2004.
Again Houston is not Harris county. Its not like NY or Philly where the county and city level are the same. Houston has just over 2M people, the county has over four million people. Double Austins population by taking in the burbs and the result will be the same. In fact a dallas poster did tgat calculation by combining Dallas county and Tarrant County where Fort Worth is from.

If you look at the core areas of Houston and ignore the burbs you will see the core is as blue as Austin.
I consider the core to be the inner loop plus parts of the SW where uptown is. People who live in Kingwood still say they live in kingwood. Doubt they even realize they are still within city limits
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Old 06-03-2013, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
13,403 posts, read 21,208,634 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HtownLove View Post
Again Houston is not Harris county. Its not like NY or Philly where the county and city level are the same. Houston has just over 2M people, the county has over four million people. Double Austins population by taking in the burbs and the result will be the same. In fact a dallas poster did tgat calculation by combining Dallas county and Tarrant County where Fort Worth is from.

If you look at the core areas of Houston and ignore the burbs you will see the core is as blue as Austin.
I consider the core to be the inner loop plus parts of the SW where uptown is. People who live in Kingwood still say they live in kingwood. Doubt they even realize they are still within city limits
Allow me to throw down the stats Htown.

Presidential election results from 2012:

Dallas + Tarrant counties:

Obama: 655,959
Romney: 643,025

Harris county:

Obama: 585,451
Romney: 584,866

Someone suggested demographics play a role in voting patterns, so here are the demographics by the same:

Dallas + Tarrant counties:

Total population: 4,333,996

White: 40.1%
Hispanic: 34%
Black: 18.8%
Asian: 5.1%

Harris County:

Total population: 4,253,700

Hispanic: 41.4%
White: 32.7%
Black: 19.3%
Asian: 6.4%

In a previous thread I added, the presidential results for all the major metro areas in Texas (including all counties). DFW, Houston, and San Antonio were almost identical in voting patterns overall. If I recall correctly, DFW was 55 Romney 45 Obama, Houston was 54 Romney 46 Obama, and San Antonio was 52 Romney 48 Obama. The Austin metro area was over 60% Obama.

Are demographics playing a role in voting patterns? Ill let the data speak for itself.
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Old 06-03-2013, 10:49 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,692 posts, read 33,704,884 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MetalLord View Post

Your thoughts?
Texas should should put up a fence for migrating Californians.
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Old 06-03-2013, 02:40 PM
 
Location: SoCal
3,771 posts, read 2,563,165 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
Texas should should put up a fence for migrating Californians.
Then there would be no growth!
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Old 06-04-2013, 03:07 AM
 
567 posts, read 911,424 times
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So what does the rest of Texas think of Austin, Dallas, and the 'urban' part of Houston? What do they think of the rest of Texas?

And how does that play out at the Statehouse?
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Old 06-04-2013, 06:23 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,113 posts, read 35,061,639 times
Reputation: 15300
Quote:
Originally Posted by MetalLord View Post
I was mainly wondering what it's like in terms of statewide politics, how 'upstaters' view/treat the city in question, and vice versa.

Las Vegas was kinda in that situation. The rest of Nevada's deep red, but of the western libertarian type rather than the Bible Belt type. While there was plenty of animosity, it was mostly about fiscal issues and water/land/mineral rights as opposed to anyone carping about moral degeneracy or whatever. There's just as many drunks, gambling addicts, and godless atheists up in those little towns as there is down in Vegas. And they have the legal brothels, whereas Vegas doesn't.

There are also some weird state political dynamics at play. Most the population (70%+) as well as most the money are concentrated in Las Vegas, but most the state political power is "up north." The legislature is part time, and the capital's way the hell up in Carson City which is an 8 hour drive from Vegas, so if you're a state politician in Vegas who also has a day job, a family, or a business, there's a great deal going against you because of the distance. People quit earlier than they would, whereas up north it's not as much of a problem, so up north the state politicians accumulate more seniority. It ends up being a giant screw job and that's how they (up north) like it.
Don't forget that Las Vegas is heavily unionized, and therefore trends Democrat. Harry Reid?
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Old 06-04-2013, 10:17 AM
 
567 posts, read 911,424 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LovinDecatur View Post
Don't forget that Las Vegas is heavily unionized, and therefore trends Democrat. Harry Reid?
Much of the rest of the state is, too. The mines.
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