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Old 07-14-2013, 12:33 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,138 posts, read 9,915,669 times
Reputation: 6424

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Quote:
Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
California has 12 ecoregions, Texas has 11, Oklahoma has 11. That is the most of the lower 48. Oregon has 9. Washington has 8.

Alaska being so huge has 20.

Ecoregions are defined by the EPA where terrestrial make up, climate, flora and fauna are distinct compared to surrounding areas.
Looking at from a natural standpoint is a good one way to look at diversity. But it is not the way and its not necessarily the best. In some cases it could be diversity as just a checklist. We have mountains -check. We have forests -check. We have swamps - check.

For instance, we have at least 5 different types of forests here in Suffolk County (and there are probably more) like Pine Barrens, Oak Brush Plains and Atlantic White Cedar Swamps. But to most people passing by in their cars, its just different types of woods.

So to me, in order to look at real diversity you have to look at how much one area changes into a very different type of area over a relatively short distance.

Here are two states. One has what I call real diversity and the other has more of the checklist type of diversity. Both states have diversity but one is really more diverse than the other. I will not mention any names so no one gets offended.

State A (real diversity) - in State A you can surf or fish in the ocean and in a few hours you can be hiking (or even skiing) in the mountains or be on ATV in the desert.
State B (checklist diversity) - in State B you have mountains in the far left hand corner of the state while on the other side of the state you have piney woods and swamps.
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Old 07-14-2013, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
6,878 posts, read 6,202,349 times
Reputation: 6178
Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
Looking at from a natural standpoint is a good one way to look at diversity. But it is not the way and its not necessarily the best. In some cases it could be diversity as just a checklist. We have mountains -check. We have forests -check. We have swamps - check.

For instance, we have at least 5 different types of forests here in Suffolk County (and there are probably more) like Pine Barrens, Oak Brush Plains and Atlantic White Cedar Swamps. But to most people passing by in their cars, its just different types of woods.

So to me, in order to look at real diversity you have to look at how much one area changes into a very different type of area over a relatively short distance.

Here are two states. One has what I call real diversity and the other has more of the checklist type of diversity. Both states have diversity but one is really more diverse than the other. I will not mention any names so no one gets offended.

State A (real diversity) - in State A you can surf or fish in the ocean and in a few hours you can be hiking (or even skiing) in the mountains or be on ATV in the desert.
State B (checklist diversity) - in State B you have mountains in the far left hand corner of the state while on the other side of the state you have piney woods and swamps.
I won't argue with you in that what you are saying is rather obvious. However, the scientists have indicated that in that "diversity" means ecosystems. The ones I stated are at what they call level 3. There are level 4 ecosystems as well. Maybe what you are describing in your area are level 4 ecosystems.
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Old 07-14-2013, 04:14 PM
 
Location: Twin Cities (StP)
3,017 posts, read 1,873,358 times
Reputation: 2342
Quote:
Originally Posted by caphillsea77 View Post
New Mexico has mountains that resemble Colorado, red rocks and canyons than appear like Arizona or Utah, and high plains that could be in Oklahoma or Texas. New Mexico is pretty much the meeting point of the desert, mesas and plateaus, Rocky mountains, and high plains. Heading out of ABQ in any direction traverses some very different topography.



I'm certainly not a Texas booster but this statement couldn't be more untrue. I'll name off five cities -

El Paso - High Desert and mountains
Austin - Green hill country
Dallas - Plains
Corpus Christi - shores of the Gulf
Houston - Bayous and piney woods to the north

I'd say that certainly defines variation.
You forgot Amarillo...... the ugliest and flattest city in the world
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Old 07-14-2013, 04:25 PM
 
981 posts, read 2,357,373 times
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Has anyone ever driven along I17 in Arizona from Phoenix to Flagstaff. Within 2 hours and some change you gain 6,000 ft elevation and you go from hot dry desert to beautiful forest mountain country. It's one of the most scenic drives I have ever experienced.
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Old 07-14-2013, 10:43 PM
 
Location: Morgantown, WV
23 posts, read 39,947 times
Reputation: 13
Washington! We went there a few months ago. In the same day, we saw the bay, mountains, high desert and wetland. Very beautiful state!
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Old 07-15-2013, 04:07 AM
 
Location: Pacific NW
6,413 posts, read 10,395,867 times
Reputation: 5806
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metro Matt View Post
Eat your words
I'm sorry, but your pretty little map proves nothing.

Look, I'm not saying that there's not a variety of terrains in Texas. There just aren't as wide of a variety as there are in the western states.
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Old 07-15-2013, 06:02 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,127 posts, read 35,070,436 times
Reputation: 15328
Quote:
Originally Posted by caphillsea77 View Post
New Mexico has mountains that resemble Colorado, red rocks and canyons than appear like Arizona or Utah, and high plains that could be in Oklahoma or Texas. New Mexico is pretty much the meeting point of the desert, mesas and plateaus, Rocky mountains, and high plains. Heading out of ABQ in any direction traverses some very different topography.



I'm certainly not a Texas booster but this statement couldn't be more untrue. I'll name off five cities -

El Paso - High Desert and mountains
Austin - Green hill country
Dallas - Plains
Corpus Christi - shores of the Gulf
Houston - Bayous and piney woods to the north

I'd say that certainly defines variation.
I would, too. Some people have watched too many western movies.
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Old 07-15-2013, 06:21 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,127 posts, read 35,070,436 times
Reputation: 15328
Some of the northeastern states have remarkable variety for their size. Look at MD, NJ and MA; you can go from mountain to sea in a short amount of time. There aren't too many states on the east coast that can claim that.
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Old 07-15-2013, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma
6,878 posts, read 6,202,349 times
Reputation: 6178
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnricoV View Post
I'm sorry, but your pretty little map proves nothing.

Look, I'm not saying that there's not a variety of terrains in Texas. There just aren't as wide of a variety as there are in the western states.
If you would use the word "drastic" instead of "wide" variety I would agree with you. Texas truly does have a "wide" variety of terrains. They just aren't as spectacular in their abruptness as the west coast states. The different areas of that Texas map are truly different and distinct.
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Old 07-15-2013, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Sunbelt
801 posts, read 860,004 times
Reputation: 691
I think the difference between Texas and California is the natural beauty of the variety of landscapes. Let's face it, the Plains area in the panhandle is just ugly. Dry yellow grass and the terrain hardly changes elevation. Then you have the Dallas prairie area. Still not very attractive. Midland and Odessa are in dried out western Texas. Not really nice to look at. El Paso is located in a desert area between some unattractive brown mountains. The change between all of these varying landscapes is also very gradual. If you drove from Dallas to Midland, you don't notice the difference until you actually think about it. But there is NO WAY that Oregon and Washington are more varied than Texas. It's just more appealing to look at forests, cliffs, and snow-capped mountains than brownish mountains and flat plains. California wins no doubt, but Texas, Oregon, and Washington are probably all tied for 2nd. Western movies only show the Arizona-like parts of Texas. You never see Amarillo, Tyler, Waco, Nacogdoches, Port Arthur, etc.
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