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Old 06-03-2013, 11:22 AM
 
Location: SLC, UT
1,571 posts, read 2,293,428 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
Chicago and San Francisco are lower than I'd expect. Buffalo and Baltimore are higher. Interesting, though.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradjl2009 View Post
Those two cities have high poverty rates. Its definitely because of that more than hipsters.
I would think that SF would be lower because of all the hills. If you have any kind of physical disability, or you have a couple kids (or more), or if you live on a big hill and all the public transportation is at the bottom of it, then you may get a car to use occasionally, just so you're not carrying bags of groceries up the hill, pushing kids in strollers, trying to get your toddler to walk up the hill, or physically being in pain from walking up the hill.

On the flip side, going car-less in SF can really get you in shape.
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Old 06-03-2013, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Chicago (from pittsburgh)
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Chicago and DC are probably the only other cities in the US (aside from NYC) I would be perfectly happy not owning a car in.
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Old 06-03-2013, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Miami-Jax
6,325 posts, read 7,003,601 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
Chicago and San Francisco are lower than I'd expect. Buffalo and Baltimore are higher. Interesting, though.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradjl2009 View Post
Those two cities have high poverty rates. Its definitely because of that more than hipsters.
Just remember that the list I linked to as well as the list I referenced are both referring to city limits. So while Chicago is 227 sq mi, San Francisco, Baltimore and Buffalo are only 47, 80 and 52 sq miles respectively.

It skews the numbers in a few different ways making it hard to infer too much from the information, only a simple broad guide.
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Old 06-03-2013, 12:09 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,081 posts, read 102,815,223 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MisfitBanana View Post
I would think that SF would be lower because of all the hills. If you have any kind of physical disability, or you have a couple kids (or more), or if you live on a big hill and all the public transportation is at the bottom of it, then you may get a car to use occasionally, just so you're not carrying bags of groceries up the hill, pushing kids in strollers, trying to get your toddler to walk up the hill, or physically being in pain from walking up the hill.

On the flip side, going car-less in SF can really get you in shape.
Pittsburgh, another very hilly city, is #11 for carless cities. Denver, no surprise, didn't even make the top 50. It's probably about 2%. However, Denver is #13 for pubic transit ridership, ahead of Pittsburgh (#16). Go figure.
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Old 06-03-2013, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Pittsburgh, another very hilly city, is #11 for carless cities. Denver, no surprise, didn't even make the top 50. It's probably about 2%. However, Denver is #13 for pubic transit ridership, ahead of Pittsburgh (#16). Go figure.
A fairly large proportion of the carless in Pittsburgh are probably Pitt/CMU students. Many undergrads, particularly those who live on campus, don't really utilize the Port Authority buses (despite being free) and instead walk everywhere in Greater Oakland.
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Old 06-03-2013, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
A fairly large proportion of the carless in Pittsburgh are probably Pitt/CMU students. Many undergrads, particularly those who live on campus, don't really utilize the Port Authority buses (despite being free) and instead walk everywhere in Greater Oakland.
A fairly large portion of the carless in Denver are probably University of Denver students. The DU students probably walk everywhere in the University area. I'm not sure that's significant.

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 06-03-2013 at 01:00 PM..
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Old 06-03-2013, 12:58 PM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eskercurve View Post
You could live pretty comfortably in Seattle without owning a car. Lots more mom and pop shops, lots more small cores spread through the city, lots more walkable neighborhoods.
I lived in Seattle without a car for a year and it was pretty easy. I lived in Capital Hill and was able to walk to a countless variety of restaurants, bars, coffee shops, and it took me about 25 minutes to walk downtown. For essentials/groceries I had Trader Joes, Safeway, and QFC all within a 5 block radius. The only thing that bugged me about living there without a car is when I wanted to get out of the city, nonetheless Seattle is very easy to live in without a car in a lot of neighborhoods there.
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Old 06-03-2013, 01:01 PM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
9,467 posts, read 18,394,521 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
A fairly large portion of the carless in Denver are probably University of Denver students. The DU students probably walk everywhere in the University area. I'm not sure that's significant.
I would imagine the Highland, LoDo, and Capital Hill neighborhoods in Denver which are all very walkbale and close to downtown would be condusive to car free living.
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Old 06-03-2013, 01:19 PM
 
985 posts, read 1,090,121 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
I can assure you that there are many people living in these cities without a car. I did it for years.

Without the OP clarifying what they mean by "comfortably", no one should be able to give an answer.


Well everyone should be able to answer and thats exactly what I did. For ME; I would not be able to live comfortably in Houston, Dallas, or ATL without a car. The cities and amenities within each are too spread out and public transit isn't as efficient as in cities like DC or Chicago. I'm sure if given the choice of living with a car vs not living with a car in Houston, DFW or ATL, you'd take the car. When I lived in DC, it was more comfortable not having a car.
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Old 06-03-2013, 01:25 PM
 
9,967 posts, read 14,653,437 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caphillsea77 View Post
I lived in Seattle without a car for a year and it was pretty easy. I lived in Capital Hill and was able to walk to a countless variety of restaurants, bars, coffee shops, and it took me about 25 minutes to walk downtown. For essentials/groceries I had Trader Joes, Safeway, and QFC all within a 5 block radius. The only thing that bugged me about living there without a car is when I wanted to get out of the city, nonetheless Seattle is very easy to live in without a car in a lot of neighborhoods there.
Seattle is a very compact centralized city. If you live in Queen Anne or Capital Hill or anywhere adjacent to downtown, you can easily walk pretty much anywhere. I've had a lot of friends who lived in Queen Anne, and while you have to walk up and down those steep hills(good excercise) they pretty much walked everywhere. The neighborhoods to the north like Fremont or Ballard are only a short bus ride from downtown as well. There's a decent regional rail going to Everett or Tacoma alsol.

But if you need to get to the eastern suburbs for work(or the further out suburbs) it can be a little more difficult--you have to plan your bus trips just right.

I know there's some ski shuttles up to the ski areas, but I'm not sure about other public transportation that could get you into the mountains. Actually last January when I was skiing at Alpental I talked to a guy working for the Forest Service who was doing a survey about the possibility of having shuttle services/public transport from downtown Seattle to National Forest trail heads in the Cascades...

That's one downside about not having a car in some western cities; you're close to the mountains but it's tough to really get up to explore them without your own transportation. Denver actually has that train to Winter Park which is pretty cool. It would be awesome if Portland had a train one could take to the Columbia Gorge(outside of an Amtrak stop on the other side of Hood River in Washington) or Government Camp on the edge of Mount Hood--or a train to the coast. In the Northeast it seems like there still are some trains that take you out to the smaller towns in the countryside or out into the mountains.
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