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Old 06-03-2013, 01:29 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Pittsburgh, another very hilly city, is #11 for carless cities. Denver, no surprise, didn't even make the top 50. It's probably about 2%. However, Denver is #13 for public transit ridership, ahead of Pittsburgh (#16). Go figure.
12.4% of households in Denver lack a car. 26.0% for Pittsburgh [city proper]. Transit ridership is 19% of workers in Pittsburgh, 7.5% of workers in Denver. I suspect those numbers are for metro? Probably far more suburbanites in Denver use transit than in Pittsburgh.

btw to get these numbers, go to Census QuickFacts then click browse more data sets

American FactFinder - Results *

And yea, sometimes transit usage and car ownership doesn't correlate. I've looked through the numbers a while ago and found some interesting patterns. Car ownership goes up with wealth much more than transit usage decreases with wealth (Seattle vs Pittsburgh is a good contrast).

Last edited by nei; 06-03-2013 at 02:46 PM..
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Old 06-03-2013, 01:34 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
That's one downside about not having a car in some western cities; you're close to the mountains but it's tough to really get up to explore them without your own transportation. Denver actually has that train to Winter Park which is pretty cool. It would be awesome if Portland had a train one could take to the Columbia Gorge(outside of an Amtrak stop on the other side of Hood River in Washington) or Government Camp on the edge of Mount Hood--or a train to the coast. In the Northeast it seems like there still are some trains that take you out to the smaller towns in the countryside or out into the mountains.
There's Amtrak + coach bus to Yosemite National Park from San Francisco (took it once, was nice since there's little need for a car within the more visited parts of the parks and my mom was scared of mountain driving — I hadn't gotten my license yet). There's some local transit to the parks surrounding the Bay Area. Outside the US but western, for Vancouver there's local bus service to the parks and mountains above North Vancouver and coach bus service to the Squamish / Whistler area.

Train might be unlikely for Portland to the Columbia River Gorge, but weekend bus [a few times a day] service might be reasonable. With stops at popular hiking trails, maybe leaving from downtown with a stop at the Gresham light rail.
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Old 06-03-2013, 01:38 PM
 
Location: Howard County, MD
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Definitely Boston, Chicago and SF. Most likely Philly and DC. Everywhere else it gets kinda dicey.
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Old 06-03-2013, 01:38 PM
 
Location: Oak Park, IL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
And yea, sometimes transit usage and car ownership doesn't correlate. I've looked through the numbers a while ago and found some interesting patterns. Car ownership goes up with wealth much more than transit usage decreases with wealth (Seattle vs Pittsburgh is a good contrast).
That makes sense. Using Chicago as an example, the vast majority of transit riders on the CTA own automobiles. Taking the train or bus to work in the Loop is a lot easier/cheaper than driving.
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Old 06-03-2013, 02:10 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oakparkdude View Post
That makes sense. Using Chicago as an example, the vast majority of transit riders on the CTA own automobiles. Taking the train or bus to work in the Loop is a lot easier/cheaper than driving.
I'd guess at least many in families have one car rather than two car families. 26% of Chicago households don't own a car [29% of have two or more cars] so they must be a sizeable fraction of CTA commuters.

For NYC suburbs, with a few exceptions, the transit commute share mainly returns % of workers working in Manhattan rather than any characteristic about the community (though often correlated with wealth and distance from Manhattan). For New York City itself, there are some mismatches of car ownership and commute use:

New Yorkers and Cars | NYCEDC

New Census Data: For Commutes, Car Use Up, Transit Down, NYC Shows Opposite Trend - WNYC

Outside of Manhattan, some wealthy areas have a similar transit commute share to poor areas but a much higher car ownership rate (though other factors such as density might play a role).
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Old 06-03-2013, 02:35 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caphillsea77 View Post
I would imagine the Highland, LoDo, and Capital Hill neighborhoods in Denver which are all very walkbale and close to downtown would be condusive to car free living.
When I/we lived in the Highlands (before it was hip), we had two cars and didn't really go downtown much. We shopped in the Highlands or in the near western suburbs, e.g. Wheat Ridge.

According to this:
Moderator cut: link removed, linking to competitor sites is not allowed
12% of households in Denver do not have cars.

Last edited by Yac; 06-07-2013 at 05:44 AM..
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Old 06-03-2013, 02:45 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
When I/we lived in the Highlands (before it was hip), we had two cars and didn't really go downtown much. We shopped in the Highlands or in the near western suburbs, e.g. Wheat Ridge.

According to this:
Moderator cut: link removed, linking to competitor sites is not allowed
12% of households in Denver do not have cars.
Whoops! Yea, the numbers I posted above were for Colorado rather than Denver [see link]. Made the same mistake for Pittsburgh. Census shows 12.4% for Denver, matching your link. Fixed it above.

Last edited by Yac; 06-07-2013 at 05:44 AM..
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Old 06-03-2013, 02:50 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Well, my 2% comment was a bit tongue in cheek. However, most people of average means or above have cars here. It's not "hip" to be carless in Denver.
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Old 06-03-2013, 09:01 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
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I lived in Philadelphia from 1990 - 2012 without owning a car. I always lived in or close to Center City and my jobs were always in the city. The combination of walking, transit, occasional taxis and car sharing make it easy. I finally broke down and bought a car only to be able to take a job requiring more regional travel.
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Old 06-03-2013, 10:08 PM
 
Location: Ypsilanti
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Well, my 2% comment was a bit tongue in cheek. However, most people of average means or above have cars here. It's not "hip" to be carless in Denver.
I met people my age, 21, in NYC that didn't have licenses and didnt look at you like you were some bum lol. It was the same to a lesser extent in Chicago, many normal people using the transit and some I met that didn't appear to have/need a car.

I'm not against cars either, I'd just use them minimally but don't want to get tied down to the cost of a car for how little I would use it, I'd use it to haul music equipment.
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