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Old 06-04-2013, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,258,197 times
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You don't need a car in any city that has a public transit system of any kind.
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Old 06-04-2013, 09:56 AM
 
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Just depends on your situation. If I quickly think of my closest friends I see all the time, 5 of the 15 of them own a car, with the other 2/3 of my friends choosing not to own one. We all make between around $55K and $120K. It's certainly not all financial, it's about WHERE YOU LIVE. I use to own a car, as well as virtually all my friends. We all just ditched them because they're much more expensive/pain in the butt than they are useful on the north side of Chicago. I always rent a car when I go back to visit my family a few times a year, and normally I get back on a Sunday and have to keep the car an extra day before I return it on Monday. I always assumed I'd use that Sunday to go shopping and do "car things" in Chicago while I actually had one. So far 100% of the time I get back to the city, park the car right away and just go visit friends or carry on like normal without the car. It's always a relief when I finally return the thing on Monday morning and have one less thing to worry about.
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Old 06-04-2013, 10:14 AM
 
Location: Ypsilanti
389 posts, read 400,799 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
You don't need a car in any city that has a public transit system of any kind.
Obviously public transit differs from city to city.
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Old 06-04-2013, 11:49 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,258,197 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Almont1 View Post
NYC is the only U.S. city where a huge number of non-poor are car free, so I would say only NYC is truly where you do not need a car (if you are middle class and higher, and not just out of college, so no obligations).

Places where once could conceivably could live fine without a car (but again, not many middle/upper class) would be, probably in order, DC, SF, Boston, Chicago and Philly.

You can always do it, but do you want to do it? Would it impact your dating life, your grocery shopping, your weekend plans? Probably yes, unless you're in NYC (where car free is so common that it's actually the exception to own a car - people assume you don't have one unless you say otherwise).
I tend to agree with this. And even with NYC, I think it's important to understand the difference between Manhattan and Brooklyn when it comes to car-free living. A lot of people in Brooklyn own cars and I'm sure the ones who don't certainly think a car could possibly be worth having in a lot of situations. But I don't think that's true of Manhattanites at all. Manhattan is the one place where a car really provides you nothing in the way of convenience whatsoever. If anything, it would probably make your life substantially less convenient unless you work in Jersey or something.

So I think it's important to put that daylight between Manhattan and Brooklyn. After Brooklyn, I would probably go with DC based on size, transit coverage and overall walkability. I would rank Chicago after DC and then you can put Boston, SF, and Philly in any order you'd like (with an edge towards Boston, imo). Then Baltimore, Seattle and Portland (never been, but people make it seem like it's a breeze to live there car-free). Then Los Angeles. Then Pittsburgh, perhaps. Then Atlanta. And on and on and on.
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Old 06-04-2013, 12:36 PM
 
725 posts, read 1,003,437 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
You don't need a car in any city that has a public transit system of any kind.
Not true...
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Old 06-04-2013, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,258,197 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toure View Post
Not true...
It is true. You don't need a car in any city with public transit.
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Old 06-04-2013, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,436 posts, read 11,937,287 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I tend to agree with this. And even with NYC, I think it's important to understand the difference between Manhattan and Brooklyn when it comes to car-free living. A lot of people in Brooklyn own cars and I'm sure the ones who don't certainly think a car could possibly be worth having in a lot of situations. But I don't think that's true of Manhattanites at all. Manhattan is the one place where a car really provides you nothing in the way of convenience whatsoever. If anything, it would probably make your life substantially less convenient unless you work in Jersey or something.
Even saying "Brooklyn" is painting with a broad brush. Someone in Williamsburg or DUMBO would have almost as little reason to have a car as someone in Manhattan. On the other hand, someone in Carnesie or Bergen Beach would almost certainly want one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
So I think it's important to put that daylight between Manhattan and Brooklyn. After Brooklyn, I would probably go with DC based on size, transit coverage and overall walkability. I would rank Chicago after DC and then you can put Boston, SF, and Philly in any order you'd like (with an edge towards Boston, imo). Then Baltimore, Seattle and Portland (never been, but people make it seem like it's a breeze to live there car-free). Then Los Angeles. Then Pittsburgh, perhaps. Then Atlanta. And on and on and on.
Pittsburgh isn't a great place to live without a car. The main issue is the bus/rail service mostly serves to get people to downtown and Oakland (the university hub). If you have a job in either place, you can easily pick a neighborhood on a good transit line, and never need a car for a commute. But there's still socializing and shopping trips to consider, and it's likely you won't have all of these needs served in your neighborhood. Pittsburgh's transit system fails here, because for the most part there isn't inter-neighborhood transit - you must go to downtown or Oakland and transfer, which is expensive and time-consuming.
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Old 06-04-2013, 01:00 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,014 posts, read 102,634,943 times
Reputation: 33082
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
So I think it's important to put that daylight between Manhattan and Brooklyn. After Brooklyn, I would probably go with DC based on size, transit coverage and overall walkability. I would rank Chicago after DC and then you can put Boston, SF, and Philly in any order you'd like (with an edge towards Boston, imo). Then Baltimore, Seattle and Portland (never been, but people make it seem like it's a breeze to live there car-free). Then Los Angeles. Then Pittsburgh, perhaps. Then Atlanta. And on and on and on.
I agree with eschaton (!). Pittsburgh isn't a great place to live w/o a car. Between Pittsburgh and Denver, I'd rather live in Denver w/o one, though more people do so in Pgh. Denver has better public transit, and way better weather for walking most of the year.

Denver's system is far better than the PAT in Pittsburgh.
RTD
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Old 06-04-2013, 01:16 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,258,197 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Even saying "Brooklyn" is painting with a broad brush. Someone in Williamsburg or DUMBO would have almost as little reason to have a car as someone in Manhattan. On the other hand, someone in Carnesie or Bergen Beach would almost certainly want one.
This is true. But my point was that there's even a big difference between living in Williamsburg and living in Manhattan. Manhattan is just so much more convenient than Brooklyn. The layout of Brooklyn is more similar to Northwest DC whereas Manhattan is, well, Manhattan.

Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Pittsburgh isn't a great place to live without a car. The main issue is the bus/rail service mostly serves to get people to downtown and Oakland (the university hub). If you have a job in either place, you can easily pick a neighborhood on a good transit line, and never need a car for a commute. But there's still socializing and shopping trips to consider, and it's likely you won't have all of these needs served in your neighborhood. Pittsburgh's transit system fails here, because for the most part there isn't inter-neighborhood transit - you must go to downtown or Oakland and transfer, which is expensive and time-consuming.
I'm sure it's not. But it's probably better than Atlanta, Houston, Dallas, Columbus, etc. That's the tier we begin to move into once you get the other big cities out of the way.

Last edited by BajanYankee; 06-04-2013 at 01:36 PM..
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Old 06-04-2013, 01:59 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,014 posts, read 102,634,943 times
Reputation: 33082
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post

I'm sure it's not. But it's probably better than Atlanta, Houston, Dallas, Columbus, etc. That's the tier we begin to move into once you get the other big cities out of the way.
But Denver is better than Pittsburgh for transit.
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