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Old 06-03-2013, 05:32 PM
 
9,967 posts, read 14,614,876 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
California because everyone knows E-40 makes the best wine in the country!

E-40 Launches Wine Collection | NBC Bay Area
And it's a moscato wine to boot... Oh man, that's even better. Are sweet desert wines the new thing in the East Bay Hyphy scene?

Just wait until Too Short releases his "Pimpinot Noir" next year...

Last edited by Deezus; 06-03-2013 at 05:57 PM..
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Old 06-03-2013, 05:56 PM
 
Location: LBC
4,155 posts, read 4,484,141 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RaymondChandlerLives View Post
It's pretty hard to pick against California in this category.

The state is the 4th largest producer of wine in the world (behind France, Italy, and Spain) and accounts for 90% of the total wine production in the United States. Many of the wines produced here give the French a run for their money.
But that doesn’t stop folks from doing just that. CA’s 3600+ wineries produce twenty-five bottles of every known style of wine to each one bottle from of WA’s 690 wineries. There are over 120 American Viticultural Areas in CA compared to WA’s 9. But judging from this thread, all those wines are over-rated, over-bearing, too buttery and, my personal favorite, “less elegant”.

Invoking “subjective opinion” is now the great American Eraser. Saying you prefer certain WA wines over certain CA wines isn’t good enough. Nope. Gotta say you prefer the whole state as wine-making entity.
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Old 06-03-2013, 06:20 PM
 
9,967 posts, read 14,614,876 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nslander View Post
But that doesn’t stop folks from doing just that. CA’s 3600+ wineries produce twenty-five bottles of every known style of wine to each one bottle from of WA’s 690 wineries. There are over 120 American Viticultural Areas in CA compared to WA’s 9. But judging from this thread, all those wines are over-rated, over-bearing, too buttery and, my personal favorite, “less elegant”.

Invoking “subjective opinion” is now the great American Eraser. Saying you prefer certain WA wines over certain CA wines isn’t good enough. Nope. Gotta say you prefer the whole state as wine-making entity.
The question though was "What is your favorite state for wine." It's all personal preference. It's all about "subjective opinion".

If you live in Oregon or Washington you'll end up drinking more local wines than California wines for the most part. Those are what's featured most often at local wine bars and shops and restaurants(along with occasionally Italian or French or Spanish or Argentine wines). You'll end up drinking California wines as well, but I don't think there's anything wrong with just preferring your local wines. There's plenty of wines in either state that can compare with the best of California.

California has tons of great wine areas, however the often quoted facts about the huge percentage of wines of US wines that come from California(90%) also includes the fact that 25% of all US wine sales are from E&J Gallo--most of which is cheaper mass-produced stuff and another 25% are big winemakers like the Franzia box wine or Charles Shaw two-buck chuck. That being said, there's more variety in regions in California(also owing to the fact that it's a huge state); Personally I like Russian River wines and a lot of stuff from Paso Robles or Monterrey County wines.

Last edited by Deezus; 06-03-2013 at 06:50 PM..
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Old 06-03-2013, 06:50 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
2,331 posts, read 3,054,646 times
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Elegant is wine jargon for fruit balanced with healthy acid and tannin. I work as a chef in a fine dining restaurant so those are the terms I think in. California makes a lot of good wine too, the problem is that most of the good stuff is really expensive for the quality level while the stuff in the $10 to $25 a bottle range is less likely to be good. California is on the southern edge of the northern hemisphere wine growing zone, this means bright sunshine and very ripe grapes. As a result when wines aren't great they are usually too sweet, too boozy or lack acid to contrast the fruitiness. Australian have a similar issue. It seems less common in wines from Europe and the Northwest. (When more northerly wines are out of whack they are usually harsh, thin or green).
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Old 06-03-2013, 06:56 PM
 
Location: LBC
4,155 posts, read 4,484,141 times
Reputation: 3543
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
The question though was "What is your favorite state for wine." It's all personal preference. It's all about "subjective opinion".

If you live in Oregon or Washington you'll end up drinking more local wines than California wines for the most part. Those are what's featured most often at local wine bars and shops and restaurants(along with occasionally Italian or French or Spanish or Argentine wines). You'll end up drinking California wines as well, but I don't think there's anything wrong with just preferring your local wines. There's plenty of wines in either state that can compare with the best of California.

California has tons of great wine areas, however the often quoted facts about the huge percentage of wines of US wines that come from California(90%) also includes the fact that 25% of all US wine sales are from E&J Gallo--most of which is cheaper mass-produced stuff and another 25% are big winemakers like the Franzia box wine or Charles Shaw two-buck chuck. That being said, there's more variety in regions in California(also owing to the fact that it's a huge state); Personally I like Russian River wines and a lot of stuff from Paso Robles or Monterrey County wines.
Cool. I prefer a nice Oklahoma Cabernet to anything produced in Spain. It’s more elegant.

I guarantee somebody out there expresses that opinion. But how much weight would you give it?

Last edited by nslander; 06-03-2013 at 07:20 PM..
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Old 06-03-2013, 07:04 PM
 
Location: LBC
4,155 posts, read 4,484,141 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drewcifer View Post
Elegant is wine jargon for fruit balanced with healthy acid and tannin. I work as a chef in a fine dining restaurant so those are the terms I think in. California makes a lot of good wine too, the problem is that most of the good stuff is really expensive for the quality level while the stuff in the $10 to $25 a bottle range is less likely to be good. California is on the southern edge of the northern hemisphere wine growing zone, this means bright sunshine and very ripe grapes. As a result when wines aren't great they are usually too sweet, too boozy or lack acid to contrast the fruitiness. Australian have a similar issue. It seems less common in wines from Europe and the Northwest. (When more northerly wines are out of whack they are usually harsh, thin or green).
I apologize for going after the the use of the word. I'm guilty on throwing around jargon as well. Then again, I think most winos from anywhere are mostly full of it:


'You Are Not So Smart': Why We Can't Tell Good Wine From Bad - David McRaney - The Atlantic

The Wine Industry Is Mostly Bull**** | American in Spain
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Old 06-03-2013, 07:37 PM
 
9,967 posts, read 14,614,876 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nslander View Post
Cool. I prefer a nice Oklahoma Cabernet to anything produced in Spain. It’s more elegant.

I guarantee somebody out there expresses that opinion. But how much weight would you give it?
I doubt anyone in reality has that opinion. I think it'd be a fascinating argument, though I've never had a wine from Oklahoma...

Quote:
I apologize for going after the the use of the word. I'm guilty on throwing around jargon as well. Then again, I think most winos from anywhere are mostly full of it:


'You Are Not So Smart': Why We Can't Tell Good Wine From Bad - David McRaney - The Atlantic

The Wine Industry Is Mostly Bull**** | American in Spain
Most winos are full of it, but here you are arguing about wine.
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Old 06-03-2013, 09:28 PM
 
Location: US Empire, Pac NW
5,008 posts, read 10,792,865 times
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Yeah, while we're being snooty about wine and arguing that most folks don't know anything about wine (which I agree with) I will defend what I said before. The wines in CA probably evolved their grapes to have more malic acid and the wineries add enough bacteria to convert that acid to lactic acid, which is smoother than malic acid. And the reason why I enjoy the WA wines more is probably due to them having different composition in the soil, and not aging them as long in the barrels.

Different strokes for different folks. Not saying the wines in CA are strange or terrible tasting - no way no how, the sangioveses I had there are superb, just not a fan of many of the whites is all.
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Old 06-03-2013, 11:23 PM
 
Location: Battle Creek, MI
494 posts, read 673,357 times
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Evidently this state ( Michigan ) is really starting to get into this business.

Say yes to Michigan wine country - Chicago Tribune
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Old 06-04-2013, 08:13 AM
 
10,559 posts, read 13,116,292 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drewcifer View Post
Elegant is wine jargon for fruit balanced with healthy acid and tannin. I work as a chef in a fine dining restaurant so those are the terms I think in. California makes a lot of good wine too, the problem is that most of the good stuff is really expensive for the quality level while the stuff in the $10 to $25 a bottle range is less likely to be good. California is on the southern edge of the northern hemisphere wine growing zone, this means bright sunshine and very ripe grapes. As a result when wines aren't great they are usually too sweet, too boozy or lack acid to contrast the fruitiness. Australian have a similar issue. It seems less common in wines from Europe and the Northwest. (When more northerly wines are out of whack they are usually harsh, thin or green).
Great post. Most CA wine is plonk, and the wine that isn't is usually extremely over priced for the quality. Also, you have like drinking fruit juice with high alcohol many times.
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