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Old 07-25-2013, 11:52 AM
 
Location: Sunbelt
801 posts, read 858,760 times
Reputation: 691

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ankhharu View Post
I lived on the north side of Chicago, Irving Park to start. I viewed many apartments that are bigger than my current one in Dallas in surrounding areas of the northside. They were $600-$700 a month and they were nicer and in better neighborhoods than the $600-$700 ones I lived in Dallas.

Hardly a gross exaggeration. I've lived here in Dallas for 15 years. It gets hot in May and it's hot into October. I think someone already posted the monthly averages. Sorry, but 90 degrees is hot to me.
I lived in Dallas for 17. So we've experienced the same things. Early May is around 85 F. October is not hot lol.

Quote:
Dallas does not have 4 seasons. "It's in Texas" would be a con too.
Not for me, and I'm not even a diehard conservative or anything close to it. Lot more people like Texas than you think. I may disagree with some of the choices made by the voting populace and the politicians in office, but overall I believe Texas is a great place to live.
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Old 07-25-2013, 02:02 PM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
13,403 posts, read 21,182,398 times
Reputation: 10279
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ankhharu View Post
I lived on the north side of Chicago, Irving Park to start. I viewed many apartments that are bigger than my current one in Dallas in surrounding areas of the northside. They were $600-$700 a month and they were nicer and in better neighborhoods than the $600-$700 ones I lived in Dallas.

Hardly a gross exaggeration. I've lived here in Dallas for 15 years. It gets hot in May and it's hot into October. I think someone already posted the monthly averages. Sorry, but 90 degrees is hot to me.
.
That would be great if the average temperatures were 90 degrees in May or October. The average high in May is 85 and the average high in October is 78.

And how long ago did you live in Chicago? I lived there in 2006-08 and there wasnt anything that wasnt garbage in Irving Park or anywhere in Chicago for $600-700. You can get a delapadated run down piece of garbage for that.
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Old 07-25-2013, 02:04 PM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
13,403 posts, read 21,182,398 times
Reputation: 10279
Quote:
Originally Posted by CowsAndBeer View Post
3.5 months plus 2 months with your underestimation = 5.5 months which is basically 6. The first time I went to Dallas, it was 104 and humid like mad in early May. Let's just say that half the year is very hot, and some of us don't like hot weather. A summer in Chicago is clearly nowhere near as hot as one in Dallas, especially if you live near the lake. In Milwaukee (for example), it's often 10-15 degrees cooler at my house near Lake Michigan than it is in the suburb I work in 20 miles inland. A comparison of average summer highs:
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Its topps 100 in May almost never. The record high is 103. So, either you came on the day it hit a record high, or your exaggerating.
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Old 07-25-2013, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,627 posts, read 27,037,620 times
Reputation: 9576
Yeah you don't really get over 100 anywhere in Texas until June. May? Most of the month is pleasant IMO. It doesn't get crazy until around Memorial day and even then, you can have temps in the lower 90s at the highest.
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Old 07-25-2013, 08:39 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,931 posts, read 11,794,667 times
Reputation: 4853
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaySwelly View Post
Not for me, and I'm not even a diehard conservative or anything close to it. Lot more people like Texas than you think. I may disagree with some of the choices made by the voting populace and the politicians in office, but overall I believe Texas is a great place to live.
I agree. Shorter summers, smarter state government, more urban cities, and some mountains in East Texas would make this place perfect, for me.
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Old 07-25-2013, 10:22 PM
 
1,340 posts, read 2,161,614 times
Reputation: 2840
For an international student: Chicago by a huge margin. You will need a car to study/live/work in the vicinity of UTD which is not even in the city of Dallas but in an adjacent suburb. A huge expense and hassle. Chicago is one of the few cities in the US with adequate public transportation for everyday needs. Many more free and cheap entertainment options in Chicago. Generally better food options. For my taste, the historic housing stock in Chicago is much more appealing than the cheap and nasty apartment complexes thrown up over the metroplex in the last 20 years. The very few places in Dallas where you can walk to a grocery store are expensive. Dallas would be okay, but winters notwithstanding and they are brutal, Chicago could be wonderful.
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Old 07-25-2013, 10:31 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,931 posts, read 11,794,667 times
Reputation: 4853
Quote:
Originally Posted by homeinatx View Post
For an international student: Chicago by a huge margin. You will need a car to study/live/work in the vicinity of UTD which is not even in the city of Dallas but in an adjacent suburb. A huge expense and hassle. Chicago is one of the few cities in the US with adequate public transportation for everyday needs. Many more free and cheap entertainment options in Chicago. Generally better food options. For my taste, the historic housing stock in Chicago is much more appealing than the cheap and nasty apartment complexes thrown up over the metroplex in the last 20 years. The very few places in Dallas where you can walk to a grocery store are expensive. Dallas would be okay, but winters notwithstanding and they are brutal, Chicago could be wonderful.
No offense, but this whole "you need a car to live in [insert Sunbelt city]" hyperbole has gotten out of hand here. No one needs a car, and there is adequate bus service in Dallas. This includes the UTD area, I believe. Tons of people do well enough, relying on the bus. I've done it myself in Houston.

Being able to walk to a grocery store is as simple as living close to a grocery store; even in the cheap, suburban neighborhoods.
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Old 07-26-2013, 12:12 AM
 
1,340 posts, read 2,161,614 times
Reputation: 2840
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
No offense, but this whole "you need a car to live in [insert Sunbelt city]" hyperbole has gotten out of hand here. No one needs a car, and there is adequate bus service in Dallas. This includes the UTD area, I believe. Tons of people do well enough, relying on the bus. I've done it myself in Houston.

Being able to walk to a grocery store is as simple as living close to a grocery store; even in the cheap, suburban neighborhoods.
Total BS. The Dallas suburbs have woeful public transportation, when they have it AT ALL. Arlington is the largest city in the U.S. entirely WITHOUT public transportation. Not a single bus or train. UTD is in Richardson, where, while there is, at least, some bus service, trust me, it is not great. Certainly not 24/7 like in Chicago
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Old 07-26-2013, 12:35 AM
 
5,368 posts, read 5,148,120 times
Reputation: 3308
Chicago - City in decline

Dallas - City that is booming

I would want to be part of a city that has a bright future. With everyday that passes Chicago is less than it was the day before.
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Old 07-26-2013, 07:49 AM
 
2,426 posts, read 3,619,375 times
Reputation: 1453
Quote:
Originally Posted by InsaneTraveler View Post
Chicago - City in decline

Dallas - City that is booming

I would want to be part of a city that has a bright future. With everyday that passes Chicago is less than it was the day before.
How is Chicago in decline?

Do some research:

Chicago Population growing:
http://www.chicagobusiness.com/artic...inally-growing

Chicago's downtown is booming:
http://www.chicagorealestatedaily.co...own-apartments

Chicago's tech industry is booming:
http://chicago.vistage.com/blog/2012...ng-tech-scene/

Several companies relocating to Chicago:
http://www.worldbusinesschicago.com/...ing-april-2013

$1.5 billion development approved, will have tallest building in U.S.:
http://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/20130...new-towers-okd

I dunno, but I think right now Chicago is more exciting and interesting than what is going on in Dallas. Unless you consider sprawl/suburbia expansion more exciting, well then, Dallas definitely wins that.

Last edited by Chicagoist123; 07-26-2013 at 08:07 AM..
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