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Old 12-30-2013, 04:02 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,258 posts, read 26,226,229 times
Reputation: 11711

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Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
Interesting question. Do you have a better source than the IRS data, because I can try to piece it together from that, but it might take a long time. (Btw, I'm sure he's including the Baltimore MSA when he says Maryland is not a part of the South (also, other government organizations define the South differently than the Census Bureau).

Anyway, I'll start compiling data, but please feel free to bail me out if you have the answer.
10.9% of the population inflows to the DC metro area between 1985 and 2010 came from the Boston, NYC and Philly MSAs. Given that 55% of the Northeast is contained in those three MSAs (that ratio has been consistent historically), it's safe, imo, to say that roughly 18-20 percent of the inflow into the DC area comes from the Northeast (as defined by the Census Bureau). My guess is that it would be closer to 18 than 20. This is for domestic migration.

There is really no other way to do it beyond looking at tax returns.

In 2012, the domestic population inflows into the state of Maryland looked like this.

South: 41,255* (36.4%)
Northeast: 40,466 (35.7%)
West: 17,269 (15.2%)
Midwest: 14,201 (12.5%)

*Excluding Delaware, the number for the South drops to 37,155 (32.8%) and the number for the Northeast increases to 44,566 (39.3%). Virginia and the District of Columbia are excluded from this calculation (since many of these people are just moving to a different part of the same metro area).
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Old 12-30-2013, 04:16 PM
 
Location: Shaw.
2,226 posts, read 3,142,569 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
10.9% of the population inflows to the DC metro area between 1985 and 2010 came from the Boston, NYC and Philly MSAs. Given that 55% of the Northeast is contained in those three MSAs (that ratio has been consistent historically), it's safe, imo, to say that roughly 18-20 percent of the inflow into the DC area comes from the Northeast (as defined by the Census Bureau). My guess is that it would be closer to 18 than 20. This is for domestic migration.

There is really no other way to do it beyond looking at tax returns.

In 2012, the domestic population inflows into the state of Maryland looked like this.

South: 41,255* (36.4%)
Northeast: 40,466 (35.7%)
West: 17,269 (15.2%)
Midwest: 14,201 (12.5%)

*Excluding Delaware, the number for the South drops to 37,155 (32.8%) and the number for the Northeast increases to 44,566 (39.3%). Virginia and the District of Columbia are excluded from this calculation (since many of these people are just moving to a different part of the same metro area).
So, a plurality.
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Old 12-30-2013, 04:19 PM
 
23 posts, read 15,892 times
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I say Florida is definitely the least southern.
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Old 12-30-2013, 04:22 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,258 posts, read 26,226,229 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
So, a plurality.
Not necessarily. I did the calculations according to the Census Bureau's definition (Delaware is in the South according to the CB). In an attempt to reflect political and cultural realities, I took those 4,100 people from the "South" column and added them to the "Northeast" (which is beyond fair since parts of Delaware are not "northeastern").

I excluded Virginia because, as I said, I wasn't able to disaggregate Virginians living in the DC metro area that moved to Maryland (e.g., someone relocating from Alexandria to Silver Spring) from Virginians living outside of the metro area that moved to Maryland. There are a lot of people from Blacksburg, Chesapeake, Hampton, Roanoke, etc. that move to the DC area too. But since there was no way of telling where in Virginia people are coming from, I just left it out altogether.

If anything, I'd say it's a wash. You have a roughly equal proportion of southerners and northerners moving to the area. And it's extremely far from "Yankee" dominance. And also keep in mind that this was only from one year (2012). During the previous three decades, Northeasteners only accounted for 18-20 percent of domestic migration to the region.
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Old 12-30-2013, 04:24 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,100 posts, read 4,732,092 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
Maryland and Jersey are 12 miles apart at their closest points.
That actually helps my argument.
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Old 12-30-2013, 04:29 PM
 
Location: Where the mountains touch the sky
4,911 posts, read 5,797,394 times
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South Dakota
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Old 12-30-2013, 04:30 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,702 posts, read 36,132,256 times
Reputation: 63275
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yn0hTnA View Post
Yes, its such an interesting juxtaposition, but it still doesn't change the fact that Texas is the West.
Texas is SOUTH. As far as east or west, it's pretty much exactly in the middle of the nation.

Heck, it wasn't even on the western border of the nation during the Civil War, since California and Oregon were already states by then!
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Old 12-30-2013, 04:32 PM
 
Location: Richmond/Philadelphia/Brooklyn
1,263 posts, read 1,272,687 times
Reputation: 741
Virginia east of Lynchburg, then its crazy bible belt world which puts the Virgin in Virginia.
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Old 12-30-2013, 04:33 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,702 posts, read 36,132,256 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Francis. View Post
I grew up in SC and Texas doesn't seem anything like the Carolinas to me. I think it has more in common with New Mexico and Arizona culturally. To me "southern" implies the state was part of the original southern colonies.
So I take it you wouldn't include Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee, Louisiana, Florida, or Arkansas in your definition of "the South" either then?

Have you ever lived in Texas, by the way?
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Old 12-30-2013, 04:45 PM
 
467 posts, read 457,590 times
Reputation: 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
So I take it you wouldn't include Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee, Louisiana, Florida, or Arkansas in your definition of "the South" either then?

Have you ever lived in Texas, by the way?
I lived in SugarLand TX for like two weeks in 2012 , took a job out there without ever going there and I decided it wasn't for me.

I don't have anything against TX, just seems a lot different to me than from the southeastern states.
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