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Old 12-30-2013, 06:41 PM
 
Location: Who Cares, USA
2,343 posts, read 2,749,490 times
Reputation: 2258

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Francis. View Post
lol East Texas in no way looks like the southeast.

Were any Civil war battles fought in Texas?
There was a civil war battle fought in Arizona:

The Battle of Picacho Peak Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org

I'm not sure why it's so difficult to think that a few may have been fought in Texas.
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Old 12-30-2013, 07:01 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,248 posts, read 26,220,119 times
Reputation: 11701
Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
Perhaps. It's fairly easy to distinguish the immigrant influx, though. DC is gaining a lot of Hispanics, but is the culture becoming more Hispanic? My LA friends will largely disagree with that statement.
The culture is absolutely becoming more Hispanic. I fail to see how that couldn't be the case. It's like on the one hand you believe that domestic migrants from the Northeast have greatly impacted the DC area's culture (even though migrants from the Northeast constitute a small minority of overall domestic migrants to the region). But then on the other hand you don't think that Hispanics have greatly impacted the area's culture. It's much easier to find an empanada in the DC area nowadays than italian ice, Taylor Ham, cannoli, etc.

Your friends from L.A. are not in a good position to evaluate the growing influence of the Hispanic population because they're just comparing DC to LA instead of looking at the growth of Hispanics in the DC area over time. Does DC have the millions and millions of Hispanics that LA has? Of course not. But that's not the same thing as saying that Hispanics are not having a larger impact on the culture. Do you have to be a liberal, white millennial to influence culture?

Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
In answer to your metro question from earlier, it seems DC (just the city) was averaging about 14,500 Americans moving there from 2005 to 2010. If that was close to accurate for 2010, then DC itself received somewhere between 25-30% of its American migrants from the Philadelphia, New York, and Boston MSAs (this does not count CSAs or other Northeastern cities close to these areas like Worcester or Lancaster). Data is from the link earlier, so if it doesn't jive with what you have, then blame Forbes.
You can make it easier on yourself by just going to the Census website and opening the spreadsheets for state to state migration flows. Since DC is a "state" for their purposes, you can simply look at the number of people moving into DC from different states. Then categorize the states by region and you've got the numbers you're looking for.

My guess is that the numbers between 2005 and 2010 would be fairly similar to the numbers for 2012. In 2012, 32% of domestic migrants to the District of Columbia came from the Northeast, 31.2% from the West, 22.8% from the South, and 13.9% from the Midwest. Northeasterners and Westerners are "over-represented" compared to their population flows to the region as a whole. Southerners are under-represented and Midwesterners have the same percentage of migrants moving to the city. That said, it's still the case that the overwhelming majority of DC transplants are not coming from the Northeast. And the 2012 numbers are more pertinent, imo, because: (1) the population flows were larger and (2) these people are likely still living in the city (as opposed to someone who moved to the District in 2005 only to move away two years later).

It's also important to note that the inflows into the city are miniscule compared to the inflows into the suburbs. So the few northeasterners moving to the District--who are a minority even within domestic migration flows to DC--are not going to have much of an impact in the region at large vis-a-vis non-Northeasterners. The DC area has really been more "southernized," "westernized" and "midwesternized" than it has been "northernized." I personally would use the term "homogenized." And the data seems to back that up.
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Old 12-30-2013, 07:13 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,931 posts, read 11,796,452 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Francis. View Post
I grew up in SC and Texas doesn't seem anything like the Carolinas to me. I think it has more in common with New Mexico and Arizona culturally. To me "southern" implies the state was part of the original southern colonies.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Francis. View Post
I lived in SugarLand TX for like two weeks in 2012 , took a job out there without ever going there and I decided it wasn't for me.

I don't have anything against TX, just seems a lot different to me than from the southeastern states.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Francis. View Post
lol East Texas in no way looks like the southeast.

Were any Civil war battles fought in Texas?
I swear it annoys me to hear people make stuff up about Texas, knowing they don't know what they're talking about.

Sugar Land for two weeks? Sit down.

No one can say this looks nothing like the southeast and be taken seriously

East Texas

East Texas

East Texas

East Texas
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Old 12-30-2013, 07:17 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,248 posts, read 26,220,119 times
Reputation: 11701
One more thing...

If we're to follow the logic that the District is now "northeastern" because a plurality (not a majority) of the migrants to the city come from the Northeast, can we also say that Chicago is now a "Black" city because African Americans are the plurality?
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Old 12-30-2013, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,651 posts, read 36,106,549 times
Reputation: 63187
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
I swear it annoys me to hear people make stuff up about Texas, knowing they don't know what they're talking about.

Sugar Land for two weeks? Sit down.

No one can say this looks nothing like the southeast and be taken seriously

East Texas

East Texas

East Texas

East Texas
You got dat right.
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Old 12-30-2013, 07:37 PM
 
183 posts, read 237,288 times
Reputation: 245
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I have lived in the southeast (for, oh, let's see, a total of about 15 years) from Virginia to Alabama and just about every state in between (including SC), and when my friends from those regions visit me in east Texas they INVARIABLY remark on how much like parts of GA, SC, and AL east Texas looks - rolling hills, pastures, fields, trees, lakes, rivers, you name it. The weather is even very similar. Similar plants and other vegetation too (minus the kudzu so far, thank goodness, though it has appeared here and there in our state). I think it looks very similar myself.

Here are a few shots from right around here in east Texas:





(Grandbabies picking blackberries)


View from my front porch:


Fun on the lake:


Summer storm:


View down the driveway at our old house a few miles from here:


View across the pasture ...early on a frosty mornin' (look away, look away, look away...Dixie Land! LOL)


Looks pretty darn southern to me.

As for Civil War battles in Texas, yes, there were a few. Here's info on one in particular:

Second Battle of Sabine Pass - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Union Army blockaded the port in Galveston for four years and occupied the port for several months till it was recaptured by Confederate forces in 1863. A few other cities also fell to Union troops at times during the war, including Port Lavaca, Indianola, and Brownsville. Federal attempts to seize control of Laredo, Corpus Christi, and Sabine Pass failed.
Texas in the American Civil War - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

There was a POW camp just down the road from me, in fact, housing Union prisoners:
Camp Ford - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

And here are a few notable Civil War personalities from Texas:
John Bell Hood gained fame as the commander of the Texas Brigade in the Army of Northern Virginia and played a prominent role as an army commander late in the war. "Sul" Ross was a significant leader in a number of Trans-Mississippi Confederate armies. Felix Huston Robertson was the only native Texan Confederate general. Capt. TJ Goree was one of Lt. General James Longstreet's most trusted aides. John H. Reagan was an influential member of Jefferson Davis's cabinet. Col. Santos Benavides was a Confederate colonel during the American Civil War. Benavides was the highest-ranking Tejano soldier to serve in the Confederate military.
Texas in the American Civil War - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

My gosh, my kids attended Robert E Lee High School in Tyler, Texas for pete's sake. Up till the 1980s or so, the school's team mascot was the Rebel - the REL Rebels (it was changed to the REL Raiders eventually). In the 1960s, when Lee's mascot was the Rebel, the school was famous for its working cannon and oversized Confederate flag. A group of seniors tended the cannon at games, firing it when the Rebel football team scored a touchdown. The football team entered Rose Stadium by running under the flag, reputed to be the second largest Confederate flag in the world (second only to one owned by the University of Mississippi). By 1972, the flag was retired and its whereabouts are unknown. The cannon, retired in 1986, is now the property of Brook Hill High School in Bullard, Texas.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_..._(Tyler,_Texas)

The other high school in Tyler is John Tyler High School. Does that name ring a bell? He was the 10th president of the USA, and he also served in the CONFEDERATE House of Representatives. Tyler, an advocate of Western expansionism, made the annexation of the Republic of Texas part of his platform soon after becoming President. Texas had declared independence from Mexico in the Texas Revolution of 1836, although Mexico still refused to acknowledge it as a sovereign state. The people of Texas actively pursued joining the Union, but Jackson and Van Buren had been reluctant to inflame tensions over slavery by annexing another Southern state. Tyler, on the other hand, intended annexation to be the focal point of his administration.
John Tyler High School - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Don't mind me asking but where exactly in Texas do you live those are some very nice pictures and honestly pertaining to this thread those pictures of the trees on the lake look just like where my grandma is from in Livingston, Alabama (minus the houses) lol
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Old 12-30-2013, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,248 posts, read 26,220,119 times
Reputation: 11701
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
I swear it annoys me to hear people make stuff up about Texas, knowing they don't know what they're talking about.

Sugar Land for two weeks? Sit down.

No one can say this looks nothing like the southeast and be taken seriously

East Texas

East Texas

East Texas

East Texas
The South ain't too popular round these parts here. I've seen people argue that Ohio was in the Northeast. And I've seen completely delusional garbage like this.

Quote:
South Carolina is 100% a southern state. North Carolina never was historically, and certainly is not today.
Like, how much LSD, coke, heroin and crystal meth do you have to inject directly into your capillaries to reach such a fantastical conclusion? I think someone upthread said that southern is a euphemism for "conservative." It's more like southern is a euphemism for conservative, racist, poor, incest, backwards, ugly, stupid, regressive, lazy and more. And so we see all of this resistance to be being called "southern" for that reason.
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Old 12-30-2013, 08:11 PM
 
Location: Who Cares, USA
2,343 posts, read 2,749,490 times
Reputation: 2258
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Like, how much LSD, coke, heroin and crystal meth do you have to inject directly into your capillaries to reach such a fantastical conclusion? I think someone upthread said that southern is a euphemism for "conservative." It's more like southern is a euphemism for conservative, racist, poor, incest, backwards, ugly, stupid, regressive, lazy and more. And so we see all of this resistance to be being called "southern" for that reason.
Which is really f***in' STUPID and just further testament to how hung up people on this site are with their precious, beloved stereotypes. As if "conservative, racist, poor, incest, backwards, ugly, stupid, regressive, lazy and more" is something that is limited to the South. You'll find every single one of those traits in every single region, state, and most likely county in this country.

What's funny, is the way people in America use "Southern" as a euphemism for these things, while the rest of the Western world just uses "America" as the exact same euphemism.
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Old 12-30-2013, 08:47 PM
 
467 posts, read 457,504 times
Reputation: 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobloblawslawblog View Post
There was a civil war battle fought in Arizona:

The Battle of Picacho Peak Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org

I'm not sure why it's so difficult to think that a few may have been fought in Texas.
nobody ever said it was difficult to believe.
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Old 12-30-2013, 08:49 PM
 
467 posts, read 457,504 times
Reputation: 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
I swear it annoys me to hear people make stuff up about Texas, knowing they don't know what they're talking about.

Sugar Land for two weeks? Sit down.

No one can say this looks nothing like the southeast and be taken seriously

East Texas

East Texas

East Texas

East Texas
Ok well I have my own opinion and I don't think Texas looks much like the Carolinas, Virginia/ Georgia at all.
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