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Old 12-31-2013, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,258,197 times
Reputation: 11726

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Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
I don't think so based on my experiences visiting Metro Atlanta and the Research Triangle (and based on the people I know from those areas). Though I'd agree that the Virginia suburbs is much closer to those areas (particularly North Carolina) than the Maryland side is. I'd say it's a cross between the Research Triangle and the Maryland suburbia.
Sooo...what is the difference between an Ohioan that moves to Atlanta and one that moves to DC? Both regions are transient as hell.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
I think I need to figure out where the Italians who hang outside the Italian store in Arlington go to church. They're as authentic as any Italians in Jersey, though only 10% of Fairfax County's population and 4.5% of Arlington's is Italian-American. The majority White population is Irish, but they're not the same as Philly or Boston's Irish population (nor Havertown, for that matter).
Now you're really reaching. The DC region has no Italian identity at all. There's no DC area equivalent of South Philly or Bensonhurst. The Italian "community" in DC is about as non-existent as white kids in DC speaking with Baltimore accents.

Italian American - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

There's not even a single town in Maryland that makes the Top 25 in terms of percentage of Italian ancestry. Maryland is only 4.5% Italian, which is well below the national average of 5.9%. The DC Metro area is 4.2% Italian. To put things in context, South Carolina is 2.7% Italian (the Charleston, SC MSA is about 3.4% Italian). I'm not seeing that big of a difference here.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
That's not how I define East Coast attitude. I think I have an East Coast attitude and that's not me (The NY Post is a garbage rag and the Philadelphia Daily News isn't much better). I could see the Washington City Paper running something like the middle one, though.
Just because you don't have it doesn't mean that the attitude is not present in these regions overall. Those papers evince a certain type of sensibility that's wholly lacking in the DC region. The point is not that everybody in the area shares it. It's the same way Italians, Irish, Jews and Puerto Ricans can form the backbone of a region's ethnic composition without every single person sharing those same identities.

So what is the "East Coast attitude" in your view? It's not cosmopolitanism because much of the Northeast is provincial. It's not liberalism because many people in the Northeast are bigots. It's not really a "Type A" mentality because that would eliminate Philly from your definition of "Northeastern." I mean, when I think of Washington, DC, I don't exactly think of aggressiveness and "street smarts" or any of that non-sense. When I think of "DC," I think of Chocolate City, and when I think of the suburbs, I think of WASPy neighborhoods and cookie cutter townhouses and McMansions.

Last edited by BajanYankee; 12-31-2013 at 02:36 PM..
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Old 12-31-2013, 02:45 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,102 posts, read 4,740,688 times
Reputation: 5374
I dislike people constantly saying Florida is mostly transplants.

It's like saying New York is all urban.

The major cities of south Florida have a lot of transplanted residents. But did you know *gasp* that Florida is more than Miami, Orlando and tourist traps!? GEE WHIZ!

There's a whole lotta country side and small townage in that there "Florduh". And I dare say Tallahassee and Pensacola do not feel like the north, no sir.

What's that? You say you only exclude southern Florida? Well while we're at it why don't we go ahead and wipe, New Orleans, Baton Rouge, Nashville, Charlotte, Atlanta, Savannah, Houston, Dallas, North Virginia, and the Ohio river valley of Kentucky out of the south? They have a lot of transplants! Must not be the south anymore.

And hey! Since transplants are your exclusive definition, let's go ahead and make southern/central Ohio, Detroit, Indiana, southern Illinois, Pittsburgh, and the southern tier of New York part of the south? They have a lot of transplanted southerners in them. Must be Dixie!
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Old 12-31-2013, 02:57 PM
 
Location: Tampa - St. Louis
1,090 posts, read 1,628,723 times
Reputation: 1513
Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
I dislike people constantly saying Florida is mostly transplants.

It's like saying New York is all urban.

The major cities of south Florida have a lot of transplanted residents. But did you know *gasp* that Florida is more than Miami, Orlando and tourist traps!? GEE WHIZ!


There's a whole lotta country side and small townage in that there "Florduh". And I dare say Tallahassee and Pensacola do not feel like the north, no sir.

What's that? You say you only exclude southern Florida? Well while we're at it why don't we go ahead and wipe, New Orleans, Baton Rouge, Nashville, Charlotte, Atlanta, Savannah, Houston, Dallas, North Virginia, and the Ohio river valley of Kentucky out of the south? They have a lot of transplants! Must not be the south anymore.

And hey! Since transplants are your exclusive definition, let's go ahead and make southern/central Ohio, Detroit, Indiana, southern Illinois, Pittsburgh, and the southern tier of New York part of the south? They have a lot of transplanted southerners in them. Must be Dixie!
I lived in Florida for 10 years and in all honesty Florida is still very much a Southern state. People act as if Florida didn't exist before New Yorkers and Latinos started to move to the state in large numbers. I would say a majority of the people in any given part of the state still recognize themselves as Southerners, especially among the native born Black and White populations. Even Miami with its large Latino population still has Southern nuances and Southern culture can be easily found throughout the state, including MIAMI-DADE, TAMPA, ORLANDO ETC. There is also a large number of people of Latino descent that were born in Florida and speak with a Southern accent, something that is frequently found with Latinos in Texas. Florida is definitely a unique place with its own distinct culture, but Florida is definitely still culturally Southern. People also ignore the fact that many people move to Florida from other Southern states like Mississippi, Georgia, South Carolina, Alabama bringing a very similar coastal Southern culture.
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Old 12-31-2013, 03:37 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,639 posts, read 27,073,493 times
Reputation: 9580
Quote:
Originally Posted by goat314 View Post
I lived in Florida for 10 years and in all honesty Florida is still very much a Southern state. People act as if Florida didn't exist before New Yorkers and Latinos started to move to the state in large numbers. I would say a majority of the people in any given part of the state still recognize themselves as Southerners, especially among the native born Black and White populations. Even Miami with its large Latino population still has Southern nuances and Southern culture can be easily found throughout the state, including MIAMI-DADE, TAMPA, ORLANDO ETC. There is also a large number of people of Latino descent that were born in Florida and speak with a Southern accent, something that is frequently found with Latinos in Texas. Florida is definitely a unique place with its own distinct culture, but Florida is definitely still culturally Southern. People also ignore the fact that many people move to Florida from other Southern states like Mississippi, Georgia, South Carolina, Alabama bringing a very similar coastal Southern culture.
Thank You. Thank You. Thank You. Florida, all of it, is still very much the South.
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Old 12-31-2013, 04:11 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,258,197 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
Thank You. Thank You. Thank You. Florida, all of it, is still very much the South.
But how could South Florida possibly be the South??? It's more like New York than anywhere outside of the Tri-State area.
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Old 12-31-2013, 05:18 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,931 posts, read 11,809,128 times
Reputation: 4853
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
But how could South Florida possibly be the South??? It's more like New York than anywhere outside of the Tri-State area.
So what region would South Florida be in? The Mid-Atlantic/Northeast? That makes no sense.

I don't remember seeing queen palm trees and pastel everywhere in NYC. South Florida is a unique entity within Florida, and Florida is in the South.
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Old 12-31-2013, 05:30 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,258,197 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
So what region would South Florida be in? The Mid-Atlantic/Northeast? That makes no sense.
Mid-Atlantic, possibly. 312,000 New Yorkers moved to Florida between 2000 and 2008. That's approximately the number that moved to New Jersey, Pennsylvania and North Carolina combined. All of that Yankee culture has now removed Florida from the South. If anything, it is now culturally aligned with the fast-paced Northeast.
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Old 12-31-2013, 05:37 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,931 posts, read 11,809,128 times
Reputation: 4853
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Mid-Atlantic, possibly. 312,000 New Yorkers moved to Florida between 2000 and 2008. That's approximately the number that moved to New Jersey, Pennsylvania and North Carolina combined. All of that Yankee culture has now removed Florida from the South. If anything, it is now culturally aligned with the fast-paced Northeast.
South Florida can't be the Mid-Atlantic because it's not in the Mid-Atlantic.

Plenty of areas of America were at one time settled by a large group of people from elsewhere, that doesn't automatically make these places of settlement directly tied to the other place. The "Yankee culture" is only PART of South Florida. It does not permeate every part of the culture.
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Old 12-31-2013, 05:44 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,258,197 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
South Florida can't be the Mid-Atlantic because it's not in the Mid-Atlantic.
It is culturally northeastern. It's full of Yankee culture. South Florida is way too rich, educated and liberal to be the South.
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Old 12-31-2013, 06:14 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
8,931 posts, read 11,809,128 times
Reputation: 4853
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
It is culturally northeastern. It's full of Yankee culture. South Florida is way too rich, educated and liberal to be the South.
Nonsense.
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