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Old 06-04-2013, 06:10 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
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...and I still don't see Miami as being so utterly un-southern. That's me, though.
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Old 07-08-2013, 11:35 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
...and I still don't see Miami as being so utterly un-southern. That's me, though.
I agree, there's still people with southern accents or some southern slang, not so much in downtown or in heavily immigrant centric areas, but definitely some in the suburban areas and in the outskirts. I had teachers in high school with southern accents. Not a rural twang or drawl but just a subtle hint.

Black Americans in Miami tend to be more southern in culture than most whites though.
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Old 07-08-2013, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Florida
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Southern FL, west TX and Northern VA. Northern VA is the worst, it's turned into a whitebread place.

However, other regions of these states are southern, especially rural areas.
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Old 07-08-2013, 03:01 PM
 
Location: Sunbelt
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People need to clarify when they say "Florida" or "Texas" (maybe Virginia too, I've never been there). It's the urban areas that aren't typically Southern anymore because of the influx of transplants and immigrants. If we are talking about typical Southern attributes, then you could argue that Atlanta isn't Southern like Birmingham is. But the rural areas which have been unaffected by new residents have retained their traditional values. People say "South Florida", but realize that only the Miami area is not "Southern". Areas near Lake Okeechobee are very Southern and even some of the smaller towns on the Gulf Coast are more Southern (Ft. Myers). Same with Tampa and Orlando: the more you drive out into the more rural areas the more Southern it gets.

But with respect to the OP, I will answer the question presented:

Florida, Texas, Virginia all tied for least Southern.
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Old 07-08-2013, 03:06 PM
 
10,167 posts, read 17,108,570 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CountryFisher View Post
Southern FL, west TX and Northern VA. Northern VA is the worst, it's turned into a whitebread place.

However, other regions of these states are southern, especially rural areas.
I can't speak for the other areas mentioned as being "least Southern of Southern", but I do have to quibble just a bit with "west Texas."

I hasten to add I definitely see the point and agree on many levels. BUT...I think most of west Texas has gotten the short end of the stick over the years when it comes to its Southern credentials, if such terms can be used.

That is to say, if the general cultural, religious, linguistic, political, attitudes and mannerisms of most of west Texas could be magically transported into even parts of the "Deep South" -- and certainly not into the Upper South areas (Arkansas, Tennessee, etc)...then not much difference would probably be noticed. What gets this area is that its topography and frontier western heritage is extremely and obviously contrasting to the classic notion of what the South should look like, in the popular mindset.

Just to note in closing, the above does not apply to the "trans-pecos" area of Texas. This part of the state is obviously part of the interior/desert "Southwest" -- southern West -- of New Mexico and Arizona. Not the Southwest of the "western South".
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Old 07-09-2013, 12:52 PM
 
10,167 posts, read 17,108,570 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
I can't speak for the other areas mentioned as being "least Southern of Southern", but I do have to quibble just a bit with "west Texas."

I hasten to add I definitely see the point and agree on many levels. BUT...I think most of west Texas has gotten the short end of the stick over the years when it comes to its Southern credentials, if such terms can be used.

That is to say, if the general cultural, religious, linguistic, political, attitudes and mannerisms of most of west Texas could be magically transported into even parts of the "Deep South" -- and certainly not into the Upper South areas (Arkansas, Tennessee, etc)...then not much difference would probably be noticed. What gets this area is that its topography and frontier western heritage is extremely and obviously contrasting to the classic notion of what the South should look like, in the popular mindset.

Just to note in closing, the above does not apply to the "trans-pecos" area of Texas. This part of the state is obviously part of the interior/desert "Southwest" -- southern West -- of New Mexico and Arizona. Not the Southwest of the "western South".
I don't like to quote myself...because it usually (as is this case) means I made a mistake in wording! LOL

Anyway, as per bolded parts above, what I meant to say was:

1. That is to say, if the general cultural, religious, linguistic, political, attitudes and mannerisms of most of west Texas could be magically transported into even parts of the "Deep South" -- and no question into the Upper South areas (Arkansas, Tennessee, etc) -- then not much difference would probably be noticed.

2. This part of the state is obviously part of the interior/desert "Southwest" -- the southern West -- of New Mexico and Arizona. Not the Southwest of the "western South" which characterizes most of the rest of western Texas. QUOTE]
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Old 07-09-2013, 12:55 PM
 
16,720 posts, read 14,684,567 times
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Talking Hands down, it's Florida

:d
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Old 07-09-2013, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,509 posts, read 7,454,824 times
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Having been to south Florida recently I say Florida. I heard more Neeew Joissey accents there than anything else. Well they were northeast accents, I cant tell one of those states accents from another in all honesty. I heard no one discuss southern heritage, no streets named for confederate generals, not much southern food, sweet tea was not on the menus at all the restaurants. People are aggressive on the roads, just like a trip up to New York. It may be most southern geographically but not southern at all culturally. Now the northern part of Florida is much more southern culturally.
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Old 07-09-2013, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Tampa
444 posts, read 455,376 times
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Only in Florida do you have to drive north to reach the south.
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Old 07-09-2013, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
6,843 posts, read 6,181,041 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasReb View Post
I don't like to quote myself...because it usually (as is this case) means I made a mistake in wording! LOL

Anyway, as per bolded parts above, what I meant to say was:

1. That is to say, if the general cultural, religious, linguistic, political, attitudes and mannerisms of most of west Texas could be magically transported into even parts of the "Deep South" -- and no question into the Upper South areas (Arkansas, Tennessee, etc) -- then not much difference would probably be noticed.

2. This part of the state is obviously part of the interior/desert "Southwest" -- the southern West -- of New Mexico and Arizona. Not the Southwest of the "western South" which characterizes most of the rest of western Texas. QUOTE]
Interesting in that I just got back from Alpine, Tx. And drove through a lot of the Texas panhandle and permian basin to get there. I think that the entire area is a mix of southern and southwestern culture with some high plains thrown in there as well in the upper part of the panhandle.

For instance, the architecture at TTU in Lubbock is very southwestern but some of the people in Lubbock are very southern, while others aren't. Obviously, terrain wise the trans-pecos area looks a lot like New Mexico but it still didn't seem overwhelmingly different in terms of the people than say eastern New Mexico.
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