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Old 06-18-2016, 09:43 PM
 
Location: Richmond, Virginia
150 posts, read 151,933 times
Reputation: 119

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Quote:
Originally Posted by i'm not a cookie View Post
I don't think people realize how southern Virginia is. Once you leave NOVA it's like a completely different world. I used to live in NOVA when I was very young/used to spend all of my summers in DC due to my dad staying there for work and we would venture into VA quite often, it's definitely a southern state, having said that I think that even if we excluded the DC suburbs when speaking about VA it still might take the crown..either VA or possibly Kentucky.
Yes, its definitely Southern overall, but compared to the rest of the South its very "Southern-Lite".
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Old 06-18-2016, 10:31 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,102 posts, read 4,746,176 times
Reputation: 5379
Quote:
Originally Posted by U146 View Post
East Texas, Southeastern Oklahoma, the Southern half of Arkansas, all of Louisiana, all of Mississippi, all of Georgia, and all of South Carolina.
He asked what the defining characteristics are. I am also curious what they are in your eyes.

In my eyes the core definers of the deep south are:

Flat to gentle rolling landscape.

Abundant sub-tropical swampland.

Food centricity and heavy handed religion in its culture.

Commonly mild to non existent winters.

Very heavy and oppressive summer weather.

Major hurricanes.

Plentiful smaller cities that begin and end abruptly.

Dominant forests of southern (Loblolly/Shortleaf/Slash/etc.) pines.

A large rural black population.
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Old 06-18-2016, 10:57 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
45,077 posts, read 36,285,285 times
Reputation: 63806
Quote:
Originally Posted by U146 View Post
East Texas, Southeastern Oklahoma, the Southern half of Arkansas, all of Louisiana, all of Mississippi, all of Georgia, and all of South Carolina.
Any part of Texas? No way. And not OK, or AR either for that matter.

Deep south - Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia, and South Carolina.
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Old 06-18-2016, 11:27 PM
 
29,949 posts, read 27,441,480 times
Reputation: 18547
Quote:
Originally Posted by U146 View Post
East Texas, Southeastern Oklahoma, the Southern half of Arkansas, all of Louisiana, all of Mississippi, all of Georgia, and all of South Carolina.
I didn't ask which states you feel are included but your definition of the Deep South and the defining characteristics of the region.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Any part of Texas? No way. And not OK, or AR either for that matter.

Deep south - Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia, and South Carolina.
The Mississippi Delta region of Arkansas should certainly be included in the Deep South IMO.
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Old 06-19-2016, 05:45 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
45,077 posts, read 36,285,285 times
Reputation: 63806
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
The Mississippi Delta region of Arkansas should certainly be included in the Deep South IMO.
And you're entitled to that opinion. I can understand why some people would include that region in their definition of the Deep South.

However, I'm discussing states in their entirety, and my opinion is that the states I listed are all Deep South states. Portions of other states may be similar but overall, the truly Deep South states traditionally are Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina.

Sometimes Texas, Arkansas, Tennessee, and Florida are thrown into that description as well, but personally I think that those four states, being on the fringe of the "Deep South" have some similarities along their borders (since culture doesn't just automatically come to a screeching halt just because of a boundary drawn on a map), but overall, I don't think those states encompass the whole aura of the Deep South like the other states I mentioned. And apparently, a lot of people agree with that concept.

Quote:
The term "Deep South" is defined in a variety of ways:

Most definitions include the states Georgia, Alabama, South Carolina, Mississippi, and Louisiana.[4]
Arkansas is sometimes included[5][6] or else considered "in the Peripheral or Rim South rather than the Deep South."[7]
The seven states that seceded from the United States before the firing on Fort Sumter and the start of the American Civil War and originally formed the Confederate States of America. In order of secession they are: South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, and Texas. The first six states were those that held the largest number of slaves.
A large part of the original "Cotton Belt", generally extending from eastern North Carolina to South Carolina and through the Gulf States as far west as East Texas, and including those parts of western Tennessee and eastern Arkansas in the Mississippi embayment.[3]
Origins[edit]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deep_South

So all of us can argue this all day long, but we probably won't reach any definitive conclusions simultaneously.
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Old 06-19-2016, 06:57 AM
 
29,949 posts, read 27,441,480 times
Reputation: 18547
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
And you're entitled to that opinion. I can understand why some people would include that region in their definition of the Deep South.

However, I'm discussing states in their entirety, and my opinion is that the states I listed are all Deep South states. Portions of other states may be similar but overall, the truly Deep South states traditionally are Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina.

Sometimes Texas, Arkansas, Tennessee, and Florida are thrown into that description as well, but personally I think that those four states, being on the fringe of the "Deep South" have some similarities along their borders (since culture doesn't just automatically come to a screeching halt just because of a boundary drawn on a map), but overall, I don't think those states encompass the whole aura of the Deep South like the other states I mentioned. And apparently, a lot of people agree with that concept.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deep_South

So all of us can argue this all day long, but we probably won't reach any definitive conclusions simultaneously.
I can understand grouping entire states as Deep South for the sake of simplicity and don't necessarily disagree, but I think the most accurate way to categorize the Deep South--or any other subregion of the South (Appalachia, Gulf Coast, mid-South, etc.)--is regionally. Only LA and MS are Deep South states in their entirety. Most of SC is Deep South but the populous northwestern portion of the state (the Upstate) really isn't, nor are the northern halves (roughly speaking) of Georgia and Alabama.
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Old 06-19-2016, 06:59 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
45,077 posts, read 36,285,285 times
Reputation: 63806
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I can understand grouping entire states as Deep South for the sake of simplicity and don't necessarily disagree, but I think the most accurate way to categorize the Deep South--or any other subregion of the South (Appalachia, Gulf Coast, mid-South, etc.)--is regionally. Only LA and MS are Deep South states in their entirety. Most of SC is Deep South but the populous northwestern portion of the state (the Upstate) really isn't, nor are the northern halves (roughly speaking) of Georgia and Alabama.
OK. You define it your way and I'll define it my way. The OP doesn't ask about regions though - the OP asks about states as a whole.
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Old 06-19-2016, 07:33 AM
 
29,949 posts, read 27,441,480 times
Reputation: 18547
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
OK. You define it your way and I'll define it my way. The OP doesn't ask about regions though - the OP asks about states as a whole.
This entire Deep South discussion is somewhat off-topic actually since the OP is talking about states that are most culturally Southern overall (not Deep Southern). There's another active thread out there that talks about the Deep South in particular.
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Old 06-19-2016, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Arch City
1,724 posts, read 1,230,482 times
Reputation: 846
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I can understand grouping entire states as Deep South for the sake of simplicity and don't necessarily disagree, but I think the most accurate way to categorize the Deep South--or any other subregion of the South (Appalachia, Gulf Coast, mid-South, etc.)--is regionally. Only LA and MS are Deep South states in their entirety. Most of SC is Deep South but the populous northwestern portion of the state (the Upstate) really isn't, nor are the northern halves (roughly speaking) of Georgia and Alabama.
Alabama and Georgia's northern halves are at minimum half Deep South and the only thing keeping them from being complete Deep South states which they in reality are is the topography. Aside from that, Georgia and Alabama and South Carolina are just as Deep South as Mississippi and Louisiana.
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Old 06-19-2016, 09:30 AM
 
Location: Arch City
1,724 posts, read 1,230,482 times
Reputation: 846
Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
He asked what the defining characteristics are. I am also curious what they are in your eyes.

In my eyes the core definers of the deep south are:

Flat to gentle rolling landscape.

Abundant sub-tropical swampland.

Food centricity and heavy handed religion in its culture.

Commonly mild to non existent winters.

Very heavy and oppressive summer weather.

Major hurricanes.

Plentiful smaller cities that begin and end abruptly.

Dominant forests of southern (Loblolly/Shortleaf/Slash/etc.) pines.

A large rural black population.
That's pretty much mine.
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