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Old 06-05-2013, 08:14 PM
 
Location: Michigan
139 posts, read 447,540 times
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Sorry if this has already been posted somewhere, I didn't search around. Very interesting though, I think I matched my home state on all but one.

22 Maps That Show The Deepest Linguistic Conflicts In America - Business Insider
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Old 06-05-2013, 09:59 PM
 
12,660 posts, read 10,505,128 times
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Very interesting, thanks for sharing! I think that every single word/phrase was correct for me and my area so very cool.

Call me a nerd but I like maps like those.
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Old 06-06-2013, 10:43 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
1,314 posts, read 1,738,027 times
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There are some options not available, for instance - in much of Wisconsin and regions around the area, people say some variation of "youse" (yoos) for "you all" or "y'all."

I honestly didn't know "roundabout" was regional, or that some easterners also said "bubbler."
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Old 06-06-2013, 11:23 AM
 
12,660 posts, read 10,505,128 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CowsAndBeer View Post
There are some options not available, for instance - in much of Wisconsin and regions around the area, people say some variation of "youse" (yoos) for "you all" or "y'all."

I honestly didn't know "roundabout" was regional, or that some easterners also said "bubbler."
I've always known bubbler is kind of a New England thing. My grandmother was born and raised in MA until she was 13 when they moved to Newark, NJ and when I was growing up, she often said 'bubbler' instead of water fountain. It's pretty contained to parts of New England, until she would say that word I'd never known it.

There are New Yorkers/New Jerseyans who also say a variation or "youse". It doesn't sound like "yoos" but more like "yas", like if you were to add an 's' to 'ya'. I guess it's a lazy way of making 'ya' (the way we often wind up pronouncing 'you') plural and I hear kind of hear it a lot around here. "How are yas doing?" for example.
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Old 06-06-2013, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Limbo
6,475 posts, read 6,186,053 times
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This is awesome stuff! Thanks for sharing.
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Old 06-06-2013, 11:52 AM
 
9,029 posts, read 16,430,940 times
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really fun read ..... the soda/pop is always a huge debate and it was interesting seeing the hard line in new york state .... i grew up right on that line and am firmly in the soda camp, but did hear both depending on where in the area I would travel
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Old 06-06-2013, 12:22 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
1,314 posts, read 1,738,027 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
I've always known bubbler is kind of a New England thing. My grandmother was born and raised in MA until she was 13 when they moved to Newark, NJ and when I was growing up, she often said 'bubbler' instead of water fountain. It's pretty contained to parts of New England, until she would say that word I'd never known it.

There are New Yorkers/New Jerseyans who also say a variation or "youse". It doesn't sound like "yoos" but more like "yas", like if you were to add an 's' to 'ya'. I guess it's a lazy way of making 'ya' (the way we often wind up pronouncing 'you') plural and I hear kind of hear it a lot around here. "How are yas doing?" for example.
Just about everyone I've ever met in Wisconsin says "bubbler." I thought it was purely a Wisconsin thing. I didn't even know there was another word for it until I was well into my teens.

Yep, I've heard easterners say "yas/yuz" as well. Since there's no proper word in the English language for it, it makes sense that there are many regional variations to cover it. Just wanted to point out that there are at least a few significant regional options left off this map.
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Old 06-06-2013, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Chicago
1,466 posts, read 1,040,398 times
Reputation: 516
I never realized I was in the minority for pronouncing crayon as "cran." Everyone around here says it that way, based on my observation. Also, I say pecan multiple ways, so I guess that makes me odd.

I don't know if it's a coincidence or not, but the pronunciation of soda seems to follow the Illinois River in Illinois. I wonder why.
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Old 06-06-2013, 01:34 PM
 
12,660 posts, read 10,505,128 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CowsAndBeer View Post
Just about everyone I've ever met in Wisconsin says "bubbler." I thought it was purely a Wisconsin thing. I didn't even know there was another word for it until I was well into my teens.

Yep, I've heard easterners say "yas/yuz" as well. Since there's no proper word in the English language for it, it makes sense that there are many regional variations to cover it. Just wanted to point out that there are at least a few significant regional options left off this map.
Definitely, but at the same time it covers it pretty accurately.
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Old 06-06-2013, 01:38 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
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Well, not in every case (see: "youse" / "yas"). Overall it's a really cool thing, for sure.
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