U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
 
Old 11-04-2007, 05:08 PM
 
2,502 posts, read 5,721,567 times
Reputation: 811
Default Best Cities for 25-30 year olds?

We all know the "youngest" cities (college towns), but what about the age demographic 5 to 10 years older?

I know there are plenty here in Vegas, but aside from that, which cities have the most 25-30 year olds? (Doesn't have to be statistical. Personal perception is fine as well.)
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-04-2007, 05:53 PM
 
231 posts, read 839,596 times
Reputation: 65
I've lived in Austin, and I would say that would be at or near the top of anyone's list. The students stay, and age in place, per the large number of 25-30 year olds. Add the tech influence, and Austin is tops
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-04-2007, 06:02 PM
 
5,181 posts, read 8,577,909 times
Reputation: 3524
Default Try college towns for the older young adult crowd.

I'm thinking that along with the late teens and early 20's crowd, you'll also find a lot of older young adults in college towns, as well as larger cities with plenty of colleges. I live near Boston, and there seem to be a lot of young professionals. Part of the reason seems to be that people who go to college there stay in the area after they graduate. Two other qualities that I would guess draw young adults to Boston are the general perception that it's a fun and vibrant city, and the local economy's emphasis on professional-sector industries. The first of these two characteristics draws people throughout the younger age range, including older younger people, while the second attracts a lot of young professionals.

If you think of cities with a vibe, this would fit most large cities to a degree, but I'd guess you'd find an especially large representation of people in their 20's and 30's in NYC, D.C., San Fran, Chicago, DFW, L.A., Atlanta, and Seattle.

I don't know the demographics, but one city many people might not think of right away which I'm guessing might have a surprising number of people in this age range is Columbus. It has several colleges, including a major university, and the kind of healthy white-collar economy that will keep a lot of those students in the area after they graduate.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-08-2007, 01:45 AM
 
Location: Columbus, central city
1,225 posts, read 2,880,248 times
Reputation: 614
Columbus has one of the youngest average populations in the US (31), this is not counting college students who do not live in the city year around. So if you factor that in, having the largest university in the US and 11 other schools, Columbus has a VERY large number of young people in its city limits and metro.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top