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Old 06-13-2013, 01:31 AM
 
Location: Denver
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Louisiana was a Spanish colony for 40 years and built most of what remains of the French Quarter along with other architectural styles.
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Old 06-13-2013, 02:14 AM
 
14,111 posts, read 22,786,445 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geography Freak View Post
Can we please stop using "Spaniard" as an adjective? American geographical ignorance is no excuse for dodgy semantics.

It's like calling Americans "English" and using the word "Englander" to refer to the actual English, as in "London is my favorite Englander city".
that was pretty much my excuse for using Spaniard as an adjective. there's no other region on earth with as many different countries and ethnic groups that speak the same language as Latin-america. so folks might have gotten confused if i hadn't used Spaniard.
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Old 06-13-2013, 11:41 AM
 
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The Texas constitution was based on Spanish law, not English. This is why they have very favorable homestead laws. It is very hard to kick someone out of their home, if they are up to date on their mortgage. it is drastically different than most Eastern states. The Spanish system was more about keeping the family intact, at all costs, which was not the case with the laws derived from England/Early Colonies.
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Old 06-14-2013, 12:51 PM
 
Location: 'Bout a mile off Old Mill Road
591 posts, read 640,340 times
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Generally speaking, I would rank the eight states most influenced by Spanish culture in this order:

1. New Mexico
2. Arizona
3. Texas
4. California
5. Florida
6. Colorado
7. Nevada
8. Oklahoma
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Old 06-14-2013, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Columbia, MD
1,431 posts, read 1,992,067 times
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In terms of cities, I would choose Albuquerque, Santa Fe, and Miami. I choose Miami because many Cuban americans are of pure Spanish decent and would certainly have no problem fitting in anywhere throughout Mediterranean Europe. Albuquerque/Santa Fe are the top choices for reasons others have stated. St. Augustine is a great pick as well! Here's a question, what about New Orleans? (or is that more french, than anything else)
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Old 06-14-2013, 02:15 PM
 
14,111 posts, read 22,786,445 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by H'ton View Post
The Texas constitution was based on Spanish law, not English. This is why they have very favorable homestead laws. It is very hard to kick someone out of their home, if they are up to date on their mortgage. it is drastically different than most Eastern states. The Spanish system was more about keeping the family intact, at all costs, which was not the case with the laws derived from England/Early Colonies.
interesting.
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Old 06-14-2013, 02:45 PM
 
9,967 posts, read 14,638,012 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by santafe400 View Post
Here's a question, what about New Orleans? (or is that more french, than anything else)
New Orleans has the purest Spanish colonial architecture(of a certain era) of any major US city in the "French" Quarter. I think amlost majority of the architecture that we think of being the Quarter(wrought-iron balconies) was built under Spanish rule. There's a number of French-influenced buildings as well and the result is sort of a mix, but it's very reminiscint of the Spanish Carribbean. I remember seeing parts of the Casco Viejo(old quarter) of Panama City that looked similar, same with pictures of San Juan or Havana. A lot of the other US cities that were under Spanish rule however brief, don't have much architecture left from that era. And Santa Fe and Albuqueque have their old districts, but it's the Spanish/Pueblo adobe mix of architectural styles rather than a pure Spanish colonial style. A lot of other US cities that were once ruled by the Spanish might have some old mission churches from that era, but not much else.

Though the culture of New Orleans was more influenced by French emigrees from Haiti and the mix of black Carribbean culture and Southern black culture. But in some ways in terms of attitude it's the most "Latin" feeling of US cities in regards to a more relaxed nature(late night culture, festive musical city)... But I don't know if it's neccesarily Spanish in feel--though there are elements from the Spanish in the area. There were immigrants from the Canary Islands to the south of New Orleans in Louisiana as well.
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Old 06-14-2013, 06:14 PM
 
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Texas, Florida, New Mexico and California
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Old 06-15-2013, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico
1,387 posts, read 1,697,241 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
New Orleans has the purest Spanish colonial architecture(of a certain era) of any major US city in the "French" Quarter. I think amlost majority of the architecture that we think of being the Quarter(wrought-iron balconies) was built under Spanish rule. There's a number of French-influenced buildings as well and the result is sort of a mix, but it's very reminiscint of the Spanish Carribbean. I remember seeing parts of the Casco Viejo(old quarter) of Panama City that looked similar, same with pictures of San Juan or Havana. A lot of the other US cities that were under Spanish rule however brief, don't have much architecture left from that era. And Santa Fe and Albuqueque have their old districts, but it's the Spanish/Pueblo adobe mix of architectural styles rather than a pure Spanish colonial style. A lot of other US cities that were once ruled by the Spanish might have some old mission churches from that era, but not much else.

Though the culture of New Orleans was more influenced by French emigrees from Haiti and the mix of black Carribbean culture and Southern black culture. But in some ways in terms of attitude it's the most "Latin" feeling of US cities in regards to a more relaxed nature(late night culture, festive musical city)... But I don't know if it's neccesarily Spanish in feel--though there are elements from the Spanish in the area. There were immigrants from the Canary Islands to the south of New Orleans in Louisiana as well.
Interesting observations and great information.

It is true that the physical aspects (the architecture) of Spanish influence in New Mexico are mostly a melding of traditional Pueblo Indian styles with a somewhat European flair introduced by the Spanish colonists/settlers. There really aren't many great examples of pure European or Colonial-styled buildings in New Mexico. The closest we come is the St. Francis Basilica in Santa Fe, which is actually modeled on French cathedrals and was built on the orders of Archbishop Lamy, a Frenchman. It was also actually built in the late 1800s while New Mexico was already under U.S. control.

However, there is much more than just the physical aspects which point to Spanish influence in New Mexico. Old Spanish land grants, which are still honored and still influence much in the state today, are an example. There are other things like that, such as the systems set up to manage the acequias (irrigation systems), which are holdovers from the days of Spanish rule. And, as was pointed out for Texas, much of the law and governmental structure in present-day New Mexico has its roots in Spanish traditions.

All that goes along with the more cultural things I've already mentioned.
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Old 06-15-2013, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Suburbs of Cleveland
193 posts, read 347,538 times
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Southern California, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Louisiana to an extent, and much of Florida.
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