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Old 06-09-2013, 02:49 AM
 
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what states and cities are the most influenced by Spanish/Spaniard culture?
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Old 06-09-2013, 04:03 AM
 
Location: Charlotte
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Miami.
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Old 06-09-2013, 04:34 AM
 
Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico
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Most people in northern New Mexico love to distinguish and point out that they are of Spanish origin and not Mexican. It's often been said that they speak a kind of Spanish that was common in Spain centuries ago. The Spanish colony/outpost in New Mexico was quite isolated from the rest of Mexico and so it was always quite different from Mexico and thus was able to keep most of its Spanish heritage, language and customs intact.

New Mexico was home to some of the first and most influential Spanish settlements in the current United States and has tons of Spanish (as opposed to Mexican) heritage and history, beginning with the first Spanish expedition to the area by Coronado in 1540.

Santa Fe, being the Spanish seat of government in New Mexico the longest, obviously has the most actual Spanish history in the state. It also thus has the most physical history left of Spanish heritage in New Mexico, with buildings such as the Palace of the Governors, which was the seat of Spanish government in New Mexico since Santa Fe was founded circa 1609-10 and is one of the oldest European-built structures in the United States as well as the oldest government building.

There are also many small towns and other larger cities in New Mexico that have rich Spanish history.

Albuquerque, for example, was founded in 1706 by the Spanish governor of New Mexico at the time and was named for a Spanish duke, the Duke of Alburquerque. It was laid out as a town in the traditional Spanish way of having a central plaza that was surrounded by government and other semi-public buildings, such as the church of San Felipe de Neri (like Santa Fe's famous Plaza area). This is today's Old Town area of Albuquerque.

The flags of New Mexico and Albuquerque also feature the Spanish national colors of red and yellow, which just goes to show how Spanish culture and identity is more dominant in New Mexico than Mexican culture.

For those reasons I think New Mexico and cities such as Santa Fe can make claims to being most influenced by Spanish/Spaniard culture.

Last edited by ABQalex; 06-09-2013 at 04:45 AM..
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Old 06-09-2013, 08:26 AM
 
Location: East side - Metro ATL
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The states that border Mexico.
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Old 06-09-2013, 01:46 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQalex View Post
Most people in northern New Mexico love to distinguish and point out that they are of Spanish origin and not Mexican. It's often been said that they speak a kind of Spanish that was common in Spain centuries ago. The Spanish colony/outpost in New Mexico was quite isolated from the rest of Mexico and so it was always quite different from Mexico and thus was able to keep most of its Spanish heritage, language and customs intact.

New Mexico was home to some of the first and most influential Spanish settlements in the current United States and has tons of Spanish (as opposed to Mexican) heritage and history, beginning with the first Spanish expedition to the area by Coronado in 1540.

Santa Fe, being the Spanish seat of government in New Mexico the longest, obviously has the most actual Spanish history in the state. It also thus has the most physical history left of Spanish heritage in New Mexico, with buildings such as the Palace of the Governors, which was the seat of Spanish government in New Mexico since Santa Fe was founded circa 1609-10 and is one of the oldest European-built structures in the United States as well as the oldest government building.

There are also many small towns and other larger cities in New Mexico that have rich Spanish history.

Albuquerque, for example, was founded in 1706 by the Spanish governor of New Mexico at the time and was named for a Spanish duke, the Duke of Alburquerque. It was laid out as a town in the traditional Spanish way of having a central plaza that was surrounded by government and other semi-public buildings, such as the church of San Felipe de Neri (like Santa Fe's famous Plaza area). This is today's Old Town area of Albuquerque.

The flags of New Mexico and Albuquerque also feature the Spanish national colors of red and yellow, which just goes to show how Spanish culture and identity is more dominant in New Mexico than Mexican culture.

For those reasons I think New Mexico and cities such as Santa Fe can make claims to being most influenced by Spanish/Spaniard culture.
awesome history lesson. i knew Albuquerque was named for Albuquerque Spain, but i didn't know all of that. i didn't know that NM retained that much of its Spanish history.. I'm sure they speak Catalan in Northerner NM.
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Old 06-12-2013, 04:10 AM
 
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Can we please stop using "Spaniard" as an adjective? American geographical ignorance is no excuse for dodgy semantics.

It's like calling Americans "English" and using the word "Englander" to refer to the actual English, as in "London is my favorite Englander city".
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Old 06-12-2013, 07:08 AM
 
Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico
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Originally Posted by Geography Freak View Post
Can we please stop using "Spaniard" as an adjective? American geographical ignorance is no excuse for dodgy semantics.

It's like calling Americans "English" and using the word "Englander" to refer to the actual English, as in "London is my favorite Englander city".
Yeah, but inevitably you get people who cannot seem to separate "Spanish" from Mexican in this country, so I think it was necessary to be used in this thread to distinguish between Spanish as a language and Spanish as a national culture, and Spain as a colonial power, that influenced certain parts of the country such as New Mexico, Florida, California and Louisiana long before Mexico gained independence and before the United States as a whole, including the areas along the border, was influenced by Mexico's people and culture.
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Old 06-12-2013, 11:01 PM
 
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I myself have a hard time differentiating Spanish (Spaniard) and Hispanic/Latino culture. It's a fairly easy mistake since I live in Arizona and the first thing that pops in my head when I hear the term "Spanish" is Latin America and not Spain. But if we're specifically talking about states that are influenced by Spanish culture then yes Northern New Mexico and its larger cities fit the bill. Central/Southern Arizona, South/Southwest Texas, California, and Southern Mexico are largely influenced by the Mexican culture for obvious reasons but I'm sure a distinctive Spaniard culture is felt somewhere in those areas.
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Old 06-12-2013, 11:14 PM
 
Location: Upper West Side, Manhattan, NYC
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Places in California, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Florida for the most part. Perhaps some parts of Nevada, Oklahoma, and even South Carolina here and there IMO.
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Old 06-13-2013, 12:43 AM
 
Location: Miami-Jax
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St Augustine, FL...just outside Jacksonville. It's the oldest city in the US and settled by Spaniards. (As was most of Florida) St Augustine's downtown has a very European feel to it.
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