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Old 06-14-2013, 03:07 PM
 
9,382 posts, read 9,539,690 times
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Shopping cart is Carriage
carbonated drink is soda or Tonic
crawfish/Crayfish it's crayfish
Aunt has a u for a reason, it's not ant but aahnt
lawyer is Loy-er
route is pronounced root
Cellar and Basement are interchangable
never ever heard anyone say tennis shoes
water dispenser is a bubbler
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Old 06-15-2013, 05:51 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,754 posts, read 36,160,327 times
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I am a military brat who has lived mostly in the southern states, but I've lived in northeast Texas for over twenty years. Here's how I pronounce these:


Carbonated Beverage: Soda

Shopping Cart: Cart

To address a group of two or more people: Y'all. Occasionally I will say "you guys."

Crayfish, Crawfish, Crawdad: Most people say crawfish but I hear crawdad quite a bit too. No one says crayfish around here.

Splinter or Sliver (A piece of wood that gets caught in your finger): Splinter - I have literally never heard anyone call a splinter a "sliver." I mean, I know people do say that, but not around me I guess!

Pecan Pie: pa -KAHN pie

Fuzzy little worms: rolly polly

Spider with 8 very long legs and a very small body: Granddaddy Long Legs

Term for an Attorney: LAW-yer..........not LOY-er.

Caramel: CARRA-mel but I do hear people around here say "CARE- mel." Two syllables.

One thing I noticed immediately about northeast Texas accents is that people say words like "light, night, right," etc with an "ah" sound rather than an "i" sound. For instance, "Turn off the lahhht," and "That's rahhhht," and "Good nahhhhhht."

We say "tennis shoes" and not "sneakers."
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Old 06-15-2013, 06:01 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,754 posts, read 36,160,327 times
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But wait - there's more!

aunt: [ænt] as in "ant" - actually it's almost two syllables - AY-unt.
been: bin
cauliflower: CALL uh flower
coupon: CUE - pahn
lawyer: LAW-yur
Mary/merry/marry: all the same
mischievous: ['mɪs-t͡ʃə-vəs] (3 syllables) though I do hear people say "mis CHEE vee us"
pajamas: pah JAH mas
realtor: REAL ter
roof: [ruf] as in "food"
root: as in "food"
syrup: SIR rup
cot/caught: very slightly different (cot has more [æ] in it)
garage: gur RODGE
grocery: GRO-sry
insurance: stress on the first syllable
One person - you. Two or three people - y'all. A group of people - all y'all!
"Are you coming with" as a full sentence: HATE IT AND NEVER HEAR IT AROUND HERE.
sale of unwanted items: garage sale
firefly vs. lightning bug: firefly
sneakers vs. tennis shoes: tennis shoes (pronounced ['tɛn-ɪ-ʃuz])
highway vs. freeway: never hear the term "freeway" around here - it's either highway, road or interstate, depending on which it actually is. A highway is a larger road, a road is a small road (two lane) and an interstate is an interstate.
roundabout vs. traffic circle vs. rotary: roundabout - except we DO NOT HAVE THEM AROUND HERE and I'm happy about that! I hate roundabouts!
frosting vs. icing: frosting or icing - usually icing though
water fountain vs. drinking fountain vs. bubbler: water fountain (but NOT bubbler or drinking fountain)
soda vs. pop vs. coke: soda
bag: as in "fad"
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Old 06-15-2013, 07:53 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,056 posts, read 54,552,165 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
I'm from Union County, NJ.



In my area, most people also say tawk for talk, awl for all, waw-ter for water, lawng for long, wawk for walk, dawg for dog, etc.
So? They are the CORRECT pronounciations, aren't they? Although, I would say "wooder" for water. Bergen County here (originally, now in Monmouth. Can't afford Bergen).
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Old 06-15-2013, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,056 posts, read 54,552,165 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Shopping cart is Carriage
carbonated drink is soda or Tonic
crawfish/Crayfish it's crayfish
Aunt has a u for a reason, it's not ant but aahnt
lawyer is Loy-er
route is pronounced root
Cellar and Basement are interchangable
never ever heard anyone say tennis shoes
water dispenser is a bubbler
Yes. I grew up saying "carriage" for a shopping cart also (northern NJ) but most people call it a cart, so I adjusted to conform.

Years ago when I worked in a large DIY store (out of business now, predated Home Depot) a British woman came up to me and asked where she could get a truck. I thought she wanted to rent a truck, maybe to haul home some building supplies. I started to give her directions to the U-Haul place up the street when she said, "Oh, there's one!" and ran over to where the shopping carts/carriages were lined up.
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Old 06-15-2013, 08:40 AM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,488 posts, read 16,154,995 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steel03 View Post
This is so interesting. I always see this brought up in discussions about American accents, but it's always just described as "pronouncing these three words the same/differently" rather than actually spelling out how they would be pronounced differently. It never even occurred to me until a few years ago that anyone would pronounce these words differently. They're all ['mɛər-i] (rhymes with "airy") for me, and that's all I've ever heard (or noticed) in person.

What do people think is the most localized pronunciation quirk they have?

For me, other than "Duck Duck Grey Duck," it's probably the "come with" or "go with" construction. Like "I'm going to Target, do you want to go with?" rather than "do you want to go with me." I don't think I've ever heard anyone from outside the "Minnesota-sphere" use that.
Mary rhymes with airy, but merry rhymes with ferry and marry rhymes with carry. But then again, being from the Midwest, all of these probably sound the same to you!

I remember some friends of mine (originally from MI) wanted to take a ferry from NJ to Manhattan one day. They wanted to "ride the fairy." I think they were waiting for me (a gay) to sprout wings, grab their hands and float across the river Peter Pan style.

They also referred to a woman named Harriet as a "Hairy It" which is no nice thing to call a lady.

BTW, what is "duck duck grey duck"?
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Old 06-15-2013, 08:42 AM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,838 posts, read 18,851,047 times
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I'm from Massachusetts, but not Boston

Shopping cart is CART, although it used to be carriage
carbonated drink is SODA
crawfish/Crayfish CRAYFISH
Aunt is AUNT, not ant
lawyer is LOYER
route is ROOT
Cellar and Basement are interchangable but mostly
CELLAR
tennis shoes are SNEAKERS
water dispenser DRINKING FOUNTAIN
HIGHWAY, freeways are in California
ROTARY now being called roundabout too
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Old 06-15-2013, 09:01 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,999 posts, read 102,581,357 times
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Coloradan here, via western PA and Illinois:

Quote:
Originally Posted by wnewberry22 View Post
I'm from Southwester Virginia and here is how we/I say some random words that seem to alternate regionally.

Feel free to add more examples...This is sorta on the fly.
==============================
Carbonated Beverage: Usually you hear people ask for a Coke and then specify but it seems like proper nouns for the beverage is most common...I.e., Sprite, Mello Yello, Mr. Pibb, etc.

I usually say "soda". Many people here, as everywhere else I've lived, say "pop".

Shopping Cart: Buggy

Cart here and in Illinois. Sometimes buggy in PA.

To address a group of two or more people: Most people say y'all but some random people say "yun'z."

Western Pennsylvanians say yunz as well. I usually say guys, or you guys.

Crayfish, Crawfish, Crawdad: Most people say crawfish but I hear crawdad quite a bit too.

No one talks about them out here.

Splinter or Sliver (A piece of wood that gets caught in your finger): Splinter

Splinter

Pecan Pie: Usually Pee-Kahn

Pe cahn

Fuzzy little worms: Usually wooly worms or rolly polly

Usually rolly polly.

Spider with 8 very long legs and a very small body: Granddaddy Long Leg

Daddy Long Leg or Granddaddy Long Leg

Term for an Attorney: LAW-yer..........not LOY-er.

Loyer, in all three places.

Caramel: Carra-mel
Car mel usually

Quote:
Originally Posted by steel03 View Post
This is so interesting. I always see this brought up in discussions about American accents, but it's always just described as "pronouncing these three words the same/differently" rather than actually spelling out how they would be pronounced differently. It never even occurred to me until a few years ago that anyone would pronounce these words differently. They're all ['mɛər-i] (rhymes with "airy") for me, and that's all I've ever heard (or noticed) in person.

What do people think is the most localized pronunciation quirk they have?

For me, other than "Duck Duck Grey Duck," it's probably the "come with" or "go with" construction. Like "I'm going to Target, do you want to go with?" rather than "do you want to go with me." I don't think I've ever heard anyone from outside the "Minnesota-sphere" use that.
I've heard "go with", "come with", etc from Chicagoans as well.
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Old 06-15-2013, 09:20 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis
1,704 posts, read 2,762,908 times
Reputation: 2335
Quote:
Originally Posted by lammius View Post
Mary rhymes with airy, but merry rhymes with ferry and marry rhymes with carry. But then again, being from the Midwest, all of these probably sound the same to you!

I remember some friends of mine (originally from MI) wanted to take a ferry from NJ to Manhattan one day. They wanted to "ride the fairy." I think they were waiting for me (a gay) to sprout wings, grab their hands and float across the river Peter Pan style.

They also referred to a woman named Harriet as a "Hairy It" which is no nice thing to call a lady.
Yep all of those words sound exactly the same to me.

Quote:
BTW, what is "duck duck grey duck"?
Less intelligent life forms call it duck duck goose.
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Old 06-15-2013, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,754 posts, read 36,160,327 times
Reputation: 63395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post

I've heard "go with", "come with", etc from Chicagoans as well.
I hate to be ornery, but I despise that terminology!!!!!!
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