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Old 06-16-2013, 10:41 PM
 
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Metro Atlanta born and Raised native Georgian

The following is what is common to the Atlanta region.

Carbonated Beverage: Coke only for colas. If someone asks specifics, then you can tell them COKE, PEPSI, or RC. Every other non-cola soft drink goes by title.

Shopping Cart: Buggy (Always BUGGY)

To address a group of two or more people: Most say y'all, even the transplants to the area. You guys is so unbelievably stupid and reeks with northeastern and west coast language.

Crayfish, Crawfish, Crawdad: Crawfish is near unanimous.

Splinter or Sliver (A piece of wood that gets caught in your finger): Splinter (a sliver, really)

Pecan Pie: Puh-cahn for city and suburb dwellers (rural Georgians say Pee-CAN)

Fuzzy little worms: Caterpillar

Spider with 8 very long legs and a very small body: Granddaddy Long Leg

Term for an Attorney: Lawyer slightly more used than loy-yer. Both are common.

Caramel: Carr-a-mel (I can't stand when people say car-mel. For crying out loud, people, there's an "A" in there, pronounce it, and don't look like a dufus who can't read.)
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Old 06-16-2013, 11:07 PM
 
Location: Joplin, Missouri
26 posts, read 30,790 times
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I feel as if I gotta clarify something for some of y'all.

On the 'fuzzy little worms'...a 'fuzzy little worm' would be a bagworm or a woolyworm.

'Rolly Pollies' or however you spell it, are NOT worms!

A 'Rolly Polly' is a SOW BUG. - (That little bug that little kids like to poke with a stick and it curls up into a ball.)
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Old 06-16-2013, 11:14 PM
 
811 posts, read 824,205 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Shadowcat View Post
I feel as if I gotta clarify something for some of y'all.

On the 'fuzzy little worms'...a 'fuzzy little worm' would be a bagworm or a woolyworm.

'Rolly Pollies' or however you spell it, are NOT worms!

A 'Rolly Polly' is a SOW BUG. - (That little bug that little kids like to poke with a stick and it curls up into a ball.)
No kidding. I couldn't believe that so many people kept saying "roly polys" which are the arthropods that roll up into a ball when you pick them up. Pill bugs are their common scientific name.
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Old 06-17-2013, 06:59 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,840 posts, read 36,186,607 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sound of Reason View Post
No kidding. I couldn't believe that so many people kept saying "roly polys" which are the arthropods that roll up into a ball when you pick them up. Pill bugs are their common scientific name.
I can only speak for myself, but the original question wasn't clear. I call roly polys just that. I do not call other fuzzy wormy things roly polys! I call them caterpillars. But the OP didn't exactly specify what sort of fuzzy, wormy thing was in question.
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Old 06-17-2013, 07:02 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,979,923 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sound of Reason View Post

Term for an Attorney: Lawyer slightly more used than loy-yer. Both are common.
I can only think of one way to spell "lawyer", I can't figure out what both of those are supposed to sound like.


Quote:
Caramel: Carr-a-mel (I can't stand when people say car-mel. For crying out loud, people, there's an "A" in there, pronounce it, and don't look like a dufus who can't read.)
I thought it was spelled without an "A" in the middle!
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Old 06-17-2013, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,096 posts, read 54,581,442 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lammius View Post
Mary rhymes with airy, but merry rhymes with ferry and marry rhymes with carry. But then again, being from the Midwest, all of these probably sound the same to you!

I remember some friends of mine (originally from MI) wanted to take a ferry from NJ to Manhattan one day. They wanted to "ride the fairy." I think they were waiting for me (a gay) to sprout wings, grab their hands and float across the river Peter Pan style.

They also referred to a woman named Harriet as a "Hairy It" which is no nice thing to call a lady.

BTW, what is "duck duck grey duck"?
Really did laugh out loud at both bolded items.
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Old 06-17-2013, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
Of course they're correct!

I've always thought "wooder" was a South Jersey thing, to be honest no one I know except my family from Monmouth and Ocean Counties say it like that.
Probably because we are just one generation out of Bergen County hicks.
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Old 06-17-2013, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
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Originally Posted by CLees View Post
According to the maps cruller was an exclusive-to-new england term(item?) which is why I asked.I don't call pants "draws" either but when I'm joking it comes out "drawers".

Come visit CT and meet some fellow sarcasts and have a grinder or better yet a steamed cheeseburger
Nope, my parents said cruller. And my mom worked in a bakery in the 1940s!
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Old 06-17-2013, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,096 posts, read 54,581,442 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
All of these for me and I am originally from Chicago all my expressions and pronounciations still hail from there with one or two exceptions.

Adding to the list:

hammock: "ock" as in shock rather that "ick" as in hammick but I have learned to say "hammick" because everyone here laughs at me if I say it the other way. But it's spelled ock not ick so go figure.

the space between to apartment buildings: the gangway

what are they showing or what's playing at the movies: what's up Friday? (Friday is when the movies change)

People here in the West pronounce the words "pen" and "pin" the same way. After 35 years of living here, I still cannot distingush between the two.
I've complained about that on similar threads, not that anyone's going to change for ME. I can't stand that. It's also southerners. I can also hear it in radio announcers and anchor people on TV. They will say "Tin O'clock" news. Would it kill them to open their mouths a little more for the short "e" sound?

A woman at work asked me for a pin one day. I said, "A safety pin?" She said, "NO! An ink pin."

Even the computer voice on my work voicemail says "Inter your passcode". Help me. I mean, Hilp me.
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Old 06-17-2013, 10:41 AM
 
811 posts, read 824,205 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
I've complained about that on similar threads, not that anyone's going to change for ME. I can't stand that. It's also southerners. I can also hear it in radio announcers and anchor people on TV. They will say "Tin O'clock" news. Would it kill them to open their mouths a little more for the short "e" sound?

A woman at work asked me for a pin one day. I said, "A safety pin?" She said, "NO! An ink pin."

Even the computer voice on my work voicemail says "Inter your passcode". Help me. I mean, Hilp me.
Oh, get off your high horse. EVERYONE, and I mean, EVERY ONE in the South pronounces pen, as in ink pen, as PIN.

Yet, you probably say car-mel, when there's clearly an extra syllable.
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