U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-17-2013, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Lincoln, NE (via SW Virginia)
1,644 posts, read 1,794,252 times
Reputation: 1053

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sound of Reason View Post
Metro Atlanta born and Raised native Georgian

The following is what is common to the Atlanta region.

Carbonated Beverage: Coke only for colas. If someone asks specifics, then you can tell them COKE, PEPSI, or RC. Every other non-cola soft drink goes by title.

Shopping Cart: Buggy (Always BUGGY)

To address a group of two or more people: Most say y'all, even the transplants to the area. You guys is so unbelievably stupid and reeks with northeastern and west coast language.

Crayfish, Crawfish, Crawdad: Crawfish is near unanimous.

Splinter or Sliver (A piece of wood that gets caught in your finger): Splinter (a sliver, really)

Pecan Pie: Puh-cahn for city and suburb dwellers (rural Georgians say Pee-CAN)

Fuzzy little worms: Caterpillar

Spider with 8 very long legs and a very small body: Granddaddy Long Leg

Term for an Attorney: Lawyer slightly more used than loy-yer. Both are common.

Caramel: Carr-a-mel (I can't stand when people say car-mel. For crying out loud, people, there's an "A" in there, pronounce it, and don't look like a dufus who can't read.)
Really? I didn't know Buggy was common in ATL. I've always heard in where I grew up (SW Virginia) and some other areas around central Appalachia (East TN and Western NC) but I never used to hear it when I would go visit family in ATL as a kid...lol, I actually used to get mocked for it
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-17-2013, 01:30 PM
 
811 posts, read 823,325 times
Reputation: 461
Quote:
Originally Posted by wnewberry22 View Post
Really? I didn't know Buggy was common in ATL. I've always heard in where I grew up (SW Virginia) and some other areas around central Appalachia (East TN and Western NC) but I never used to hear it when I would go visit family in ATL as a kid...lol, I actually used to get mocked for it
Everyone I know and grew up around said "buggy". TV commercials and advertisements always said buggy. It is only recently with the proliferation of companies based outside the region that you hear advertisements say "cart". I'd argue that a lot of transplants say cart, but the vast majority of natives say "buggy". A majority of the population says buggy. Perhaps your family was different than most of the population around here.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-17-2013, 04:49 PM
 
9,519 posts, read 13,433,244 times
Reputation: 5692
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawn10am View Post
I wasn't even aware that people actually pronounced lawyer like "loy-er" or that that was an acceptable pronunciation. Why do people say that? Do they also say "break the loy?"
Hahahaaa I say "loy-er"... Love my accent though- so unique
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-17-2013, 04:52 PM
 
9,519 posts, read 13,433,244 times
Reputation: 5692
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
Of course they're correct!

I've always thought "wooder" was a South Jersey thing, to be honest no one I know except my family from Monmouth and Ocean Counties say it like that.
The correct pronunciation is WAW-Ter
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-17-2013, 06:09 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,003 posts, read 54,493,040 times
Reputation: 66349
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sound of Reason View Post
Oh, get off your high horse. EVERYONE, and I mean, EVERY ONE in the South pronounces pen, as in ink pen, as PIN.

Yet, you probably say car-mel, when there's clearly an extra syllable.
I know they do--that's exactly what I'm complaining about. And I like it up here on my high horse just fine, thanks. The view is great.

I already addressed the caramel/car-mel issue earlier in this thread. I learned to say it properly as an adult. Maybe someday you can learn to say a short "e"!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-17-2013, 06:20 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,651 posts, read 36,106,549 times
Reputation: 63187
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
Nope, my parents said cruller. And my mom worked in a bakery in the 1940s!
I've lived in the south most of my life and we've always said "crueller" (or however you spell it) and that's how they are labeled in doughnut stores as well, throughout the South.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-17-2013, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,651 posts, read 36,106,549 times
Reputation: 63187
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
I know they do--that's exactly what I'm complaining about. And I like it up here on my high horse just fine, thanks. The view is great.

I already addressed the caramel/car-mel issue earlier in this thread. I learned to say it properly as an adult. Maybe someday you can learn to say a short "e"!
I would bet the farm that you have some pronunciation idiosyncracies - everyone does.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-17-2013, 06:39 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,648,620 times
Reputation: 35449
Co-worker from Boston called them "elastics" the rest of us called them "rubber bands."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-17-2013, 06:49 PM
 
Location: Lincoln, NE (via SW Virginia)
1,644 posts, read 1,794,252 times
Reputation: 1053
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sound of Reason View Post
Everyone I know and grew up around said "buggy". TV commercials and advertisements always said buggy. It is only recently with the proliferation of companies based outside the region that you hear advertisements say "cart". I'd argue that a lot of transplants say cart, but the vast majority of natives say "buggy". A majority of the population says buggy. Perhaps your family was different than most of the population around here.
Maybe...they're Valdostans by birth.

TITLETOWN!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-17-2013, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Keizer, OR
1,376 posts, read 2,513,325 times
Reputation: 1148
Coming from someone who grew up in Oregon with Texan parents...


Carbonated Beverage: I used to say Pop back home, but here calling "soda" pop is unheard of.

Shopping Cart: Cart

To address a group of two or more people: I say y'all or you guys

Crayfish, Crawfish, Crawdad: Crawfish or crawdad, NEVER crayfish

Splinter or Sliver (A piece of wood that gets caught in your finger): Splinter

Pecan Pie: Usually Puh-KAHN

Fuzzy little worms: Potato bug or rolly polly

Spider with 8 very long legs and a very small body: Daddy longlegs

Term for an Attorney: Loi-yer

Caramel: Car-muhl
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top