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Old 06-16-2013, 11:22 PM
 
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Extreme poverty in Appalachia is mostly confined to eastern Kentucky, southern West Virginia, and a few locales of southwestern Virginia and extreme northeastern Tennessee.

Western North Carolina, north Georgia, the upstate of South Carolina, northeast Alabama, most of eastern Tennessee, and most of the northern Appalachians are not areas with extreme poverty.
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Old 06-17-2013, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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People living in the western small towns are much more likely to have finished high school than those in Appalachia. Look at the comparative school graduation rates in the states.
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Old 06-17-2013, 10:44 AM
 
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Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
People living in the western small towns are much more likely to have finished high school than those in Appalachia. Look at the comparative school graduation rates in the states.
You've also got to consider a few things.

Most rural areas in the west are uninhabited, so most people who live there do so as either retirees, or are of the rugged individualist, granola eating types. These people, furthermore, do not live in the vast expanses of nothingness. They generally live in the coastal states, or in the mountainous areas. These places aren't typical for raising children, since much of this area lacks jobs. On the other hand, those who live in the rural arid regions of the west are often very poor, considering that they don't attract the more educated, granola-eating type of "hippie". They, instead, are what the individualist who doesn't have as much education, nor as much disposable income can afford.

In the South, in CENTRAL Appalachia (KY, WV), these places have been settled for centuries, many of them originally around large industries, which allowed a significant population to settle there. When industries closed, the people didn't leave, which led to many leading a life of poverty on government subsistence.
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Old 06-20-2013, 04:26 PM
 
Location: Alabama!
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Originally Posted by Sound of Reason View Post
Western North Carolina...and most of the northern Appalachians are not areas with extreme poverty.
Tell that to the hundreds of people who lost their jobs when the furniture and textile factories moved overseas.
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Old 06-23-2013, 02:54 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Southlander View Post
Tell that to the hundreds of people who lost their jobs when the furniture and textile factories moved overseas.
I'm not saying that there aren't people in western North Carolina who aren't impoverished. There are. However, compared to eastern Kentucky and southern West Virginia, it's "a drop in the bucket".
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Old Today, 11:35 AM
 
Location: Chi > DC > Reno > SEA
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There is poverty in the Mountain West, you just need to know where to look. That would be Indian reservations and the towns that don't have historic or "resort" appeal - I don't know other Western states well, but in Nevada you could look around Dayton, Imlay, or Beowawe to see what white Western poverty looks like.
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Old Today, 12:16 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
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Originally Posted by fiddlestick View Post
Why are most of the small towns in Appalachia poor whereas most of the small towns in the western U.S. are not poor such as small towns in Utah, Colorado, Wyoming, South Dakota, Montana?
It's appearances - they are still poor. Things rust in Appalachia and fall down. The western towns don't rust but they still fall down.
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Old Today, 01:33 PM
 
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Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
It's appearances - they are still poor. Things rust in Appalachia and fall down. The western towns don't rust but they still fall down.
This is important. Humidity destroys things more than just time. Also, the poor Appalachian towns have just had a lot longer to decay. Also, there are more numerous small, secluded small towns in Appalachia. Also, generational poverty is a stronger dynamic in Appalachia since the West is just newer overall.
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Old Today, 03:03 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sound of Reason View Post
You've also got to consider a few things.

Most rural areas in the west are uninhabited, so most people who live there do so as either retirees, or are of the rugged individualist, granola eating types. These people, furthermore, do not live in the vast expanses of nothingness. They generally live in the coastal states, or in the mountainous areas. These places aren't typical for raising children, since much of this area lacks jobs. On the other hand, those who live in the rural arid regions of the west are often very poor, considering that they don't attract the more educated, granola-eating type of "hippie". They, instead, are what the individualist who doesn't have as much education, nor as much disposable income can afford.

In the South, in CENTRAL Appalachia (KY, WV), these places have been settled for centuries, many of them originally around large industries, which allowed a significant population to settle there. When industries closed, the people didn't leave, which led to many leading a life of poverty on government subsistence.
This is an excellent assessment. Too, there are many small towns in upstate SC, western NC, eastern TN, and in VA along the I-81 corridor that are very nice. In the South and West, there are pockets of poor and not poor. The post above went into more detail. But it is also important to not get into blanket assertions and stereotyping.
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