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View Poll Results: Are the Western states more "transplant-friendly" than the Southern states?
Yes 95 61.69%
No 59 38.31%
Voters: 154. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-27-2013, 09:40 AM
 
21,193 posts, read 30,379,606 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
I am a Midwestern transplant to the PNW and I have heard people say "Oh so-and-so is from "Back East" in the same derogatory manner as you have heard Southerners use the term Yankee when they didn't like someone from east of the Rockies.

I think it's all relative. Some people from one place sometimes just don't take to people from another.
Exactly. A nice spin by the OP in terms of their experience but the reality is the "Back East"/"Up North" conversation doesn't change with geography.
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Old 07-27-2013, 06:07 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,668,169 times
Reputation: 35449
Quote:
Originally Posted by Upstate Nancy View Post
I think the Western attitude isn't so much about "appearances" (except parts of Cali). It's just they don't want to waste time on anyone unless they want to. Just live their lives and let things be. I like that to an extent, but it can be taken too far--no sense of helping each other/community with that vibe.
I don't think that is necessarily true. The Western attitude I have found does care about appearances only in a different way. It's not always about material things but about conforming to nonconformity. It's kind of difficult to explain but one example would be if you are not as "laid back" which in translation is usually apathetic or are not into the current fad which could be anything from atheism to veganism You can be persona non gratis to those around you.

These are extreme examples but what I am trying to get at is that there are standards people are expected to follow in order to feel they belong just like any other place.

I agree with the lack of sense of community when things get carried too far. Sometimes doing your own thing can be detrimental to others but people are seem to feel that's the standard.
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Old 07-27-2013, 08:25 PM
Status: "could've~would've~should've used 'have', not 'of'" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
10,487 posts, read 14,325,180 times
Reputation: 23286
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZonaZoo View Post
I just don't enjoy being called or referred to as a "Yankee," and I don't like hearing that word thrown around in casual conversation. It's just not cool. Have some respect, bro.
Yankee, someone who lives above the mason dixon line, doesn't have a southern accent and doesn't refer to all carbonated drinks as coke. Seriously it's all in the context and the majority of the time it's not a derogatory term nor meant to be disrespectful. It kills me when people get all twisted up over being called a yankee. Call me a yankee all day long, it's fine because that's what I am. I might even correct you and tell you I'm a damn yankee because I don't ever plan on living up north again.

Bless your heart is not always an insult, in spite of what a lot of people believe. Again it depends on the context. If someone is so bad at reading other people that they can't tell the difference, then perhaps the south isn't the best place for them.

The Southern Hospitality myth- it's when other people get the hare brain idea that it means everybody in the south is going to welcome you into their hearts and homes and invite you to be their BFF as soon as they meet you.
Southern hospitality is mostly about manners and being polite (even to those you don't like).
How it got turned into some crazy notion that people in the south apparently aren't allowed to ever dislike other people is beyond me. As long as you aren't rude to someone's face it perfectly acceptable to dislike them. I guess some people want to call that backstabbing. To me that's just another instance of not being able to read people, if you can't tell whether or not they genuinely like you or are just being polite to you.
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Old 07-27-2013, 09:36 PM
 
Location: In the realm of possiblities
2,713 posts, read 2,281,857 times
Reputation: 3239
We were born and raised in Texas, and moved to Utah for a bit. We were never talked bad about because we were transplants. Matter of fact, at first, people were fascinated with our accent, and the stories of our life in Texas. We lived amongst folks from Washington state, San Diego, Nevada, and a lot of native Utahans, and never felt any animosity. There were cultural differences, for sure, but that was the extent of it. Our neighbors were the greatest bunch of folks we have ever known, and are still in contact with them. Now we are in Tennessee, and have interacted with people from Illinois, Indiana, and Florida, and geographic differences never mattered in any instance. Again there are cultural differences that folks bring with them, wherever they go. I am certain we brought those things with us, as well. Most folks I have dealt with are more interested in what took us to Utah, then here to Tennessee, rather than trying to judge us. Maybe it's the live, and let live attitude we have that steers us away from conflict that this thread has mentioned. A lot of the folks we grew up in Texas with have a code they live by. I will mind my business, and you mind yours. It seems to work for a lot of folks down there. If you don't tell me how to live, then we will get along fine. I honestly feel that what matters most is the character of the individual, be they North, South, East, or West. Good people are good, and bad people are bad, no matter what area of this country they are from. So, to sum it up, for us, no, we haven't ever been discriminated against because we talk with a slow, Texas drawl, and say bob war, fixin to go, and other gems from our native dialect. Viva difference!
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Old 07-28-2013, 03:21 AM
 
Location: Hell, Arizona
97 posts, read 127,315 times
Reputation: 54
I'd say Arizona is pretty nice to transplants, since that's a good majority of our citizens. A lot of people have been moving here from the New England/Midwest area recently and it's never been a problem. Arizona is "underdeveloped" compared to the majority of other states in the sense that we're newer and most people haven't had more than four generations of family living here. A lot of us can easily point to an older relative and say "they came here from blah blah blah" or it's usually them who moved here. This counts for a lot of the west, actually. The parts where it doesn't count would be where the Gold Rush really kicked in and there is older settlements.

But there is bad people and good people in every state. If you thoroughly believe a region of the country discriminates out of state people more than another, you obviously aren't branching out enough.
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Old 07-28-2013, 04:51 AM
Status: "Be yourself. What's the alternative?" (set 20 days ago)
 
8,696 posts, read 10,845,026 times
Reputation: 12754
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
I don't think that is necessarily true. The Western attitude I have found does care about appearances only in a different way. It's not always about material things but about conforming to nonconformity. It's kind of difficult to explain but one example would be if you are not as "laid back" which in translation is usually apathetic or are not into the current fad which could be anything from atheism to veganism You can be persona non gratis to those around you.

These are extreme examples but what I am trying to get at is that there are standards people are expected to follow in order to feel they belong just like any other place.

I agree with the lack of sense of community when things get carried too far. Sometimes doing your own thing can be detrimental to others but people are seem to feel that's the standard.
Conforming to nonconformity.Then it's just still conformity (disguised). Hehe. I can see that. Appearances important in S. California for sure and/or other parts of Cali, but not so much in other places.

Last edited by Nanny Goat; 07-28-2013 at 05:03 AM..
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Old 07-28-2013, 04:58 AM
Status: "Be yourself. What's the alternative?" (set 20 days ago)
 
8,696 posts, read 10,845,026 times
Reputation: 12754
Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
Yankee, someone who lives above the mason dixon line, doesn't have a southern accent and doesn't refer to all carbonated drinks as coke. Seriously it's all in the context and the majority of the time it's not a derogatory term nor meant to be disrespectful. It kills me when people get all twisted up over being called a yankee. Call me a yankee all day long, it's fine because that's what I am. I might even correct you and tell you I'm a damn yankee because I don't ever plan on living up north again.

Bless your heart is not always an insult, in spite of what a lot of people believe. Again it depends on the context. If someone is so bad at reading other people that they can't tell the difference, then perhaps the south isn't the best place for them.

The Southern Hospitality myth- it's when other people get the hare brain idea that it means everybody in the south is going to welcome you into their hearts and homes and invite you to be their BFF as soon as they meet you.
Southern hospitality is mostly about manners and being polite (even to those you don't like).
How it got turned into some crazy notion that people in the south apparently aren't allowed to ever dislike other people is beyond me. As long as you aren't rude to someone's face it perfectly acceptable to dislike them. I guess some people want to call that backstabbing. To me that's just another instance of not being able to read people, if you can't tell whether or not they genuinely like you or are just being polite to you.
Good post on the subject. Some people just can't get into the idea that politeness is their "norm" in social situations. It's just that simple. Nothing more to read into it!
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Old 07-28-2013, 08:08 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,668,169 times
Reputation: 35449
Quote:
Originally Posted by Upstate Nancy View Post
Conforming to nonconformity.Then it's just still conformity (disguised). Hehe. I can see that. Appearances important in S. California for sure and/or other parts of Cali, but not so much in other places.
Exactly. Like in some circles in Portland, if a person doesn't drive a Prius or a certain model of Subaru, they are an outcast. And heaven help them if they choose to drive a shiny new SUV. There is a lot of snobbery here but it isn't always about material things. Many people are surprised at that and have a difficult time adjusting when they first move here believe everything here is laid back and anything goes. That is not always true for everyone but it applies to many transplants.

I imagine that's pretty much like anywhere else. I have never lived in the South but I don't imagine it would be any different there. Anyone moving from one place to another is going to experience some culture shock. I certainly did when I moved from the Midwest to the PNW but I learned to fit in. You just have to find your niche in the new place and remember that you have to embrace the new place because it isn't going to change for you.
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Old 07-29-2013, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
1,314 posts, read 1,738,027 times
Reputation: 946
I don't consider myself a "Yankee," so don't call me one. It's that simple. And yes, it's offensive when you're called something derisively, which is how "Yankees" are referred to by some Southerners.
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Old 07-29-2013, 10:18 AM
Status: "could've~would've~should've used 'have', not 'of'" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
10,487 posts, read 14,325,180 times
Reputation: 23286
Quote:
Originally Posted by CowsAndBeer View Post
I don't consider myself a "Yankee," so don't call me one. It's that simple. And yes, it's offensive when you're called something derisively, which is how "Yankees" are referred to by some Southerners.
key word is "some". Just like "some" people could call you 'dear' and make it sound like a vile curse. Use of the word yankee doesn't automatically mean someone is out to offend you.
Besides if you are east of the Mississippi River and live in the northern part of the country why aren't you a yankee? Don't you consider people east of the Mississippi River living in the southern part of the country to be southerners?
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