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Old 06-19-2013, 10:12 AM
 
9,967 posts, read 14,628,835 times
Reputation: 9193

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrTesla35 View Post
I had ajob interview at a company located near Borbourn Street a few years ago. They had a taxi pick me up at the airport and take me straight to the hotel they put me in. I didn't realize it was near Bourbour street at the time, and I stumbled out fairly late to get someting to eat and ended up on Borbour street, and I stepped right on a hobo lying on the sidewalk who I did not see b/c it was dark and no street lighting.

I don't know if I'd call New Orleans quaint, at least borbourn street. pretty trash looking I think.
Bourbon Street is just one street that's for the lowest common denominator type of tourist intent solely on getting wasted... The whole city of New Orleans isn't Bourbon Street and to judge New Orleans just based on Bourbon Street is like judging New York simply on the tackiness surrounding Times Square or judging San Francisco based on Fisherman's Wharf....
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Old 06-19-2013, 10:55 AM
 
166 posts, read 146,587 times
Reputation: 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
Bourbon Street is just one street that's for the lowest common denominator type of tourist intent solely on getting wasted... The whole city of New Orleans isn't Bourbon Street and to judge New Orleans just based on Bourbon Street is like judging New York simply on the tackiness surrounding Times Square or judging San Francisco based on Fisherman's Wharf....
Ok, well I went there about 3 months after Katrina and I didn't have access to my own car so I didn't get to see much if it but it looked a bit on the ROUGH side. there was also a smell of stench in the air, the smell of human waste. I felt as if i was in 3rd world country in many ways.

I did get to see the North Shore areas last year when I interviewed at Stennis Space Center in southern Miss. It was ok but not really my cup of tea.
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Old 06-19-2013, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Augusta, GA ''The fastest rising city in the southeast''
7,285 posts, read 12,335,848 times
Reputation: 802
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrTesla35 View Post
I'd say Augusta has more personality than Athens if we just talking about the downtown area. Athens just an old mill town with a big state college. Never saw what the big deal is. Augusta riverwalk is fairly vibrant at night. I actually think most people would rank Augusta over Columbus and Macon.

I'd say Greenville SC has the most personality of any southern city. It has the best downtown by far I think. Charleston is runner up. Columbia might be underrated.
Dont worry, because this guy has a bias against Augusta. The same few people from Savannah and Columbus always gang up on Augusta in the Georgia forum. The people in Columbus get mad, because Richmond and Muscogee County have similar populations. Yet, the people in the GA forum rank Augusta higher due to GDP, metro population, urban population, etc. The guy from Savannah feels like Savannah is the 2nd city of Georgia(i guess because of their downtown and tourism)and doesn't like Augusta having more national retail, GDP, higher MSA population, or larger urban population.

Last edited by nortonguy; 06-19-2013 at 12:08 PM..
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Old 06-19-2013, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Outer Boroughs, NYC
1,666 posts, read 1,310,907 times
Reputation: 1076
@Norton. Augusta is a larger metro (575,000), and so it would have more national retail, GDP, etc. than Savannah or Columbus. That comes with a larger MSA. Savannah is Georgia's second city in every other way -- including media market, airport passengers, and of course visitors: all the guide books (Lonely Planet, Fodor's, Frommer, DK, Let's Go, Blue Moon) have 5 pages on Savannah but often none on Augusta except or a short paragraph on the Master's.

Greenville and even Columbia fall behind Charleston on any South Carolina cities list. There's no comparison, none at all. Charleston reigns supreme (and that's putting it mildly).
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Old 06-19-2013, 04:02 PM
 
166 posts, read 146,587 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by masonbauknight View Post
@Norton. Augusta is a larger metro (575,000), and so it would have more national retail, GDP, etc. than Savannah or Columbus. That comes with a larger MSA. Savannah is Georgia's second city in every other way -- including media market, airport passengers, and of course visitors: all the guide books (Lonely Planet, Fodor's, Frommer, DK, Let's Go, Blue Moon) have 5 pages on Savannah but often none on Augusta except or a short paragraph on the Master's.

Greenville and even Columbia fall behind Charleston on any South Carolina cities list. There's no comparison, none at all. Charleston reigns supreme (and that's putting it mildly).
lol, well northerners tend to like Charleston more. But Greenville's downtown is more attractive from landscaping aesthetic standpoint, it's less tourist based. Greenville has more engineering companies and Charleston has a more service /tourism based economoy. Charleston has the history but ouside of that it doesn't have much.
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Old 06-19-2013, 04:27 PM
 
42 posts, read 57,780 times
Reputation: 25
When I lived in the UK Brighton was filled with character which made a nice refreshing place to call home. Virginia Beach was a pretty dull city though. I've lived there twice and there really isn't a whole lot I'd recommend to someone visiting. I mean, even the beach there wasn't all that memorable.
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Old 06-19-2013, 04:48 PM
 
166 posts, read 146,587 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deanda View Post
When I lived in the UK Brighton was filled with character which made a nice refreshing place to call home. Virginia Beach was a pretty dull city though. I've lived there twice and there really isn't a whole lot I'd recommend to someone visiting. I mean, even the beach there wasn't all that memorable.
Hampton roads is pretty gritty. williamsburg seems like the nicest area there.
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Old 06-20-2013, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
183 posts, read 241,742 times
Reputation: 156
*Certain* parts of Hampton Roads would be gritty.VA Beach to me has absolutely no personality IMO and may be one of the most sterile cities in the nation. However, just over the border Norfolk has plenty of personality and plenty of grit too. Also, Savannah is definitely up high on the list. And those who say Atlanta has no personality must have only hung out in the suburbs or in Buckhead. Hang out in the eastside neighborhoods and you'll see PLENTY of character. Honestly, as much as I despise this place, even 5 points in downtown Atlanta has lots of character as well.
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Old 06-20-2013, 10:47 AM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 15,053,596 times
Reputation: 4482
Newer, more transient places have less of an identifiable personality than older cities. Today, there are only a few cities that I think you could be dropped off in blindfolded and immediately know where you were when you take off the blindfolds. Those cities are:

-Seattle
-Portland
-San Francisco
-Los Angeles
-Austin
-New Orleans
-Denver
-New York
-Boston
-DC
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Old 06-20-2013, 01:01 PM
 
Location: Carrboro, NC
1,462 posts, read 1,447,895 times
Reputation: 1878
Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
Newer, more transient places have less of an identifiable personality than older cities. Today, there are only a few cities that I think you could be dropped off in blindfolded and immediately know where you were when you take off the blindfolds. Those cities are:

-Seattle
-Portland
-San Francisco
-Los Angeles
-Austin
-New Orleans
-Denver
-New York
-Boston
-DC
I would know exactly where I was in pretty much any American city over 400,000 in population. Yet there are dozens of cities in Europe where I wouldn't be sure where I was, despite them having a lot more history and probably a lot more character. That just reflects my knowledge, not the city.
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