U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-08-2013, 10:53 AM
 
Location: SW France
14,259 posts, read 14,147,026 times
Reputation: 27916

Advertisements

If I could wave a magic wand I'd like to be able to visit every State Capital of the US and explore the various places.

I am certain that I would generally find them to be fascinating places. Although I have travelled a bit round the US, and lived there for a while, I would love to hear your insights into the various Capitals that you are familiar with.

Thanks in advance for any replies.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-08-2013, 10:59 AM
 
7,279 posts, read 13,532,516 times
Reputation: 3610
It would be a neat trip... in theory. State capitals are rarely the most interesting cities in the state, and that's often by design. State lawmakers, guided by physiocratic notions, generally sited capitals in a way where they would be free from the influence of (or at least geographically separated from) the most populous and most powerful cities in the state. I don't know many people who would recommend visiting Albany instead of NYC or Springfield instead of Chicago. And so forth.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2013, 11:00 AM
 
Location: San Francisco
9,033 posts, read 8,753,461 times
Reputation: 5666
Actually, one feature of many US state capitals is that they are, by design, NOT very interesting places. In many cases they were deliberately placed at a distance from their states' centers of population and industry, which means they're mostly one-industry (government) towns. It's the same line of thinking that placed the capital of the former West Germany in Bonn; the capital of Switzerland in Bern; and the capital of the EU in Brussels. None of these is a particularly exciting place, at least compared to other cities in their respective countries.

There are a few state capitals that could be described as "fascinating," but their interest lies mainly in their historical/cultural/scenic value, not in the fact that they're state capitals. Annapolis, Boston, Austin, Santa Fe, and Honolulu come to mind.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2013, 02:10 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,014 posts, read 102,634,943 times
Reputation: 33082
Colorado has a lovely Capitol Building, with several steps marked as exactly one mile above sea level: the 15th step of the west entrance (1894), the 18th step, measured in 1969, and the 13th step measured in 2003. The building has a beautiful gold dome.
Colorado State Capitol - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2013, 09:21 PM
 
Location: Cbus
1,721 posts, read 1,404,423 times
Reputation: 2089
My home state of New Jersey has Trenton as our capital.

It's a pretty down and out city with not much to do. I live in Columbus which is Ohio's capital city. I think it's a great town to live in, do business, or party but it's not a vacation destination at all.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2013, 09:52 PM
 
Location: Juneau
601 posts, read 712,189 times
Reputation: 2272
Juneau is definitely an interesting capital. It has an ice field in the city limits, whales, bears, wolves...only reached by boat or plane, unless you plane to ski over from British Columbia. It stretches along a narrow strip of land at the base of the coast mountains and is surrounded by ice, water and vertical landscapes. The city is also one of the worlds largest at over 3,000 sq. miles.



Image of the channel and valleys where it's located and the ice field that looms behind it. Its also the only capital that borders a foreign nation.

Last edited by takuriver; 08-08-2013 at 09:58 PM.. Reason: Misspelled word
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2013, 10:24 PM
 
6,419 posts, read 10,869,759 times
Reputation: 6696
Quote:
Originally Posted by pch1013 View Post
Actually, one feature of many US state capitals is that they are, by design, NOT very interesting places. In many cases they were deliberately placed at a distance from their states' centers of population and industry, which means they're mostly one-industry (government) towns. It's the same line of thinking that placed the capital of the former West Germany in Bonn; the capital of Switzerland in Bern; and the capital of the EU in Brussels. None of these is a particularly exciting place, at least compared to other cities in their respective countries.

There are a few state capitals that could be described as "fascinating," but their interest lies mainly in their historical/cultural/scenic value, not in the fact that they're state capitals. Annapolis, Boston, Austin, Santa Fe, and Honolulu come to mind.
Phoenix
Little Rock
Denver
Hartford
Atlanta
Honolulu
Boise
Indianapolis
Des Moines
Boston
St. Paul
Jackson
Columbus
Oklahoma City
Providence
Columbia
Nashville
Salt Lake City
Charleston
Cheyenne

That is a list of the state capitals that are either the state's largest city, largest metro, or both. 40%. Then you have others like Sacramento, Raleigh, Austin, and Richmond that are in 1 million+ metros, and several others that are the state's second largest city or metro and a very important commercial, industrial, or cultural center.

I think it's true that some capitals are, by design, the way you say it...but that is a large generalization of state capitals. States distribute their resources in different ways. Some put their major colleges and universities in small or smaller towns and cities where they become "college towns" that are separate from the major economic centers. Others put them in major metropolitan areas.

So really, state capitals run the gamut from small to large, boring to interesting, quaint to bustling.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2013, 10:47 PM
 
3,510 posts, read 4,964,318 times
Reputation: 3499
Montpelier Vermont is the only state capital that has no McDonald's !

Cheyenne Wy ,and Juneau Ak, are not at all centrally located in their states.

Tallahassee FL, in the 1800s was centrally located to the state's population, which at that time only lived in the northern part of FL. The capital no longer seems central, now that southern FL's population has grown extremely. One could kind of say the same thing about Sacramento, CA.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2013, 01:14 AM
 
Location: SW France
14,259 posts, read 14,147,026 times
Reputation: 27916
Thanks for the posts so far.

I am keen to hear your personal views of the various Capitals, and the comments so far have been most interesting.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2013, 07:04 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis
1,704 posts, read 2,764,942 times
Reputation: 2336
I have lived in three state capitals - Pierre, St. Paul, and Des Moines.

Pierre is where I was born. It's a fairly lifeless government town, but the people are nice and the state capitol complex is gorgeous, just really really underrated.

I didn't live in St. Paul proper, but I wasn't very far from the city limits. MSP is obviously one of the nicest metros in the country. Downtown St. Paul is much less happening than downtown Minneapolis, but it's still well kept and fun to explore. There's a huge Asian population in St. Paul. The neighborhoods in western St. Paul are my favorite in the whole MSP area (Grand Ave, Summit-University, Mac-Groveland).

I also haven't lived in Des Moines proper, but again, not far from the city limits. I've lived in West Des Moines and Urbandale. The cities it's most like are Omaha, Madison, MSP, and Kansas City. The capitol building is my favorite in the country, and well worth a tour if you're visiting. Des Moines is one of those midsized cities experiencing major progress and growth right now, along with the likes of Omaha and Grand Rapids. It's a lot of fun to watch it explode culturally, economically, and demographically.

Others I've visited:
Denver
Lincoln
Topeka
Madison
Indianapolis
Columbus
Richmond
(Washington)
Harrisburg

And others I've only driven through:
Bismarck
Oklahoma City
Lansing
Nashville
Jackson
Atlanta
Columbia
Raleigh
Charleston
Boston (just the airport)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top