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View Poll Results: Will spanish be our second language in 100 years
Yes 17 56.67%
No 13 43.33%
Voters: 30. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-17-2013, 10:08 PM
 
181 posts, read 249,041 times
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Canada has english and french. And the United States has english and spanish. And people are always like "oh spanish speakers will assimilate". Will the United States be bilingual always?

http://mumford.albany.edu/children/r...tion_brief.pdf
German was once our second language.


Data Center Language Snapshot
We have 8 million spanish speakers under 18 in 2010, and 247,366. So can this population of spanish speakers sustain itself without immigration?

Report: Immigration From Mexico Won't Go Back to Peak Levels of 1990s - ABC News

"Thus, while a high degree of uncertainty still prevails concerning the size of flows that may be observed in the near term," the authors write, "the main conclusion we draw from our analysis is that net migration flows of Mexicans to the United States over the coming years are likely to increase as compared to what was observed during the recent global crisis, but that such flows are very unlikely to reach the levels registered in the 1990s."

So what do you think? Will spanish stick around? I always feel jealous that Canada has a second language, but the Usa doesn't.
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Old 08-17-2013, 11:10 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,527 posts, read 7,483,594 times
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I think there will always be a fair amount of Spanish speakers in the USA. In fact there always has been, the southwest has always had them. Also the addition of the state of Puerto Rico will guarantee the presence of the Spanish language in the USA.
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Old 08-17-2013, 11:57 PM
 
Location: Queens, NY
199 posts, read 355,791 times
Reputation: 393
New Mexico was incorporated as a state with Spanish as an official language. Puerto Rico should become a state (sooner rather than later, they've held referendums and if Republicans weren't so concerned about how it would affect their National poll results, we'd have a 51st and 52nd state by now (Puerto Rico, DC, perhaps even Guam, the Virgin Islands and American Samoa but there is less push there).

The US will have a large number of Spanish speakers for the foreseeable future - as long as there is a massive income disparity between Latin America and the United States, we'll see a positive immigration wave into the US from the south. We've had large numbers of French Canadians as well for more than a century, plus Haitians and West Africans, so our number of French and Creole speakers is not insignificant.

Just based on sheer numbers, we'll likely have sizable Chinese, Hindi, Bengali, Swahili, Arabic and Indonesian language influx in the next century. The populations there are too large and opportunities too few for too many not to see immigration patterns more heavily shift to these countries.

However unlike Canada, which was the home country of French Quebecois for centuries who had their own cities, homeland and civil society, the US will likely not have a large multilingual state, just a large number of minorities who use other languages among First Generation, less frequently among Second Generation, and have an almost unanimous switch to English by the Third and Fourth Generations of immigrants. In that way perhaps it will be less "linguistically diverse", though by sheer numbers in the many US cities, I think the immigrant experience throughout the US will be more diverse than in all but the largest dozen or two Canadian cities.
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Old 08-18-2013, 11:59 AM
 
Location: USA (dying to live in Canada)
1,034 posts, read 1,563,736 times
Reputation: 389
Spanish will not become an official language in the U.S., indeed only 12% of the U.S. population speak Spanish which means that most Americans don't.

Spanish language will either be steady or decline in the United States because second or third generation Hispanics speak only English with only few speaking Spanish. Spanish will decline just like the German did long time ago. Even if Puerto Rico becomes a state (virtually very small chance), it will not increase or promote Spanish language in mainland USA.

Canada has French as official language because of Quebec, and also because of history and culture.
I wish America had French as official language as well, but not Spanish.
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Old 08-18-2013, 03:27 PM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
13,403 posts, read 21,234,352 times
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Yes. Per capita, Canada is much more a nation of immigrants than the US. The reason seems to be that it's easier to get a visa there.
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Old 08-19-2013, 12:49 AM
 
Location: Go West young man...
409 posts, read 774,851 times
Reputation: 319
Quote:
Originally Posted by Citykid55 View Post
Canada has english and french. And the United States has english and spanish. And people are always like "oh spanish speakers will assimilate". Will the United States be bilingual always?

http://mumford.albany.edu/children/r...tion_brief.pdf
German was once our second language.


Data Center Language Snapshot
We have 8 million spanish speakers under 18 in 2010, and 247,366. So can this population of spanish speakers sustain itself without immigration?

Report: Immigration From Mexico Won't Go Back to Peak Levels of 1990s - ABC News

"Thus, while a high degree of uncertainty still prevails concerning the size of flows that may be observed in the near term," the authors write, "the main conclusion we draw from our analysis is that net migration flows of Mexicans to the United States over the coming years are likely to increase as compared to what was observed during the recent global crisis, but that such flows are very unlikely to reach the levels registered in the 1990s."

So what do you think? Will spanish stick around? I always feel jealous that Canada has a second language, but the Usa doesn't.
Spanish will always be around in the names of places...San Francisco, San Diego, Colorado, Las Vegas, Toledo etc...but outside of that if immigration flows from Spanish speaking countries were to abruptly stop... Spanish would eventually die out just like the language of every other immigrant group that has arrived in the US.
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Old 08-20-2013, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
8,483 posts, read 10,486,078 times
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If Spanish ever became the official or co-official language of this country than all Americans would become Hispanic/Latino.
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Old 08-20-2013, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...a traveling man.
39,592 posts, read 47,849,351 times
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The Asian population is the fastest growing in the US with the Hispanic's being the dominate ethnic group in CA within 1 year and TX with other states soon to follow.

Hispanics Set To Outnumber Texas’ White Population In One Decade, Calif. In One Year CBS Houston

Asians Fastest-Growing Race or Ethnic Group in 2012, Census Bureau Reports - Population - Newsroom - U.S. Census Bureau
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Old 08-20-2013, 05:21 PM
 
Location: Colorado
434 posts, read 1,013,864 times
Reputation: 271
Hopefully everyone already knows this, but the United States has NO official language.
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Old 08-20-2013, 11:19 PM
 
Location: SGV, CA
816 posts, read 1,558,787 times
Reputation: 1243
The influx of Spanish speaking immigrants will be more than offset by the loss of Spanish fluency among 3rd and 4th generation Hispanic Americans.
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