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Old 09-22-2013, 01:09 PM
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
10,587 posts, read 14,379,099 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
What is so "communal" about a drive-in movie? You go in your private auto, stick a speaker in the window, watch the movie and drive home. Not much different than watching a movie in your living room.
Hmmm... drive-ins I grew up with all had playgrounds where kids and parent would kill time waiting for the movie to start. And back then they charged by the carload not by individuals, so people were a lot more prone to invite friends and neighbors and tailgate from the back of the truck or station wagon (dating myself, hehe).
Teens of course always went as a group or as part of a double date, so very social there, although kids still tend to go to theatres in groups. I think it tends to be a little less 'social' though because you don't have quite the same freedom to horse around or neck in a public theatre as you do in a car.
Same with ice cream shops and pizza parlors, they were often a place for younger teens to hang out after school or on weekends. My kids did a little of that kind of thing growing up but it sure isn't as popular as when I was growing up. Video arcades are a thing of the past too I think, another place where kids would go to just hang out and be around other people.
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Old 09-22-2013, 01:29 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,071 posts, read 102,800,958 times
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My family never, and I mean never, went to the drive-in. I went a few times w/friends in my teens. Yeah, went a few times with dates, too. There was also plenty of necking in the theater in my hometown, esp. in the balcony. Also there was plenty of time to horse around afterwards at a snack shop or wherever.

Since when have all the ice cream shops, pizza parlors, etc closed? That's not how it is in my town.

My kids did a lot of that, also went to the local roller rink, ice rink, HS football games, etc to fool around.
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Old 09-22-2013, 01:35 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,353 posts, read 19,620,797 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
Video arcades are a thing of the past too I think, another place where kids would go to just hang out and be around other people.
You got a Chuck e cheese or Dave & Busters in your area?

Looks like the DC region has a lot more community than some people give it credit for. lol
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Old 09-23-2013, 12:11 AM
 
Location: Deep in the Woods
2,570 posts, read 2,690,292 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
My family never, and I mean never, went to the drive-in. I went a few times w/friends in my teens. Yeah, went a few times with dates, too. There was also plenty of necking in the theater in my hometown, esp. in the balcony. Also there was plenty of time to horse around afterwards at a snack shop or wherever.

Since when have all the ice cream shops, pizza parlors, etc closed? That's not how it is in my town.

My kids did a lot of that, also went to the local roller rink, ice rink, HS football games, etc to fool around.
I think different regions have different pastimes. I was mostly speaking in general about my area, but I think people can relate to some aspects of what I've seen in my town, in their town. For example, we still have tons of pizza places here, locally owned. When I lived in the South, most of the pizza places were chains.

Another example of a regional difference are the number of drive-in theatres in PA and Upstate NY. Whereas in my state, there's only one left. As land is so expensive here, drive-in's don't make it here. They are not making it well even in cheaper areas.

But I'm glad to hear that these pastimes are not gone everywhere. Perhaps this area has been harder hit by this, again due to the pressure from housing and development and not much space.
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Old 09-23-2013, 12:24 AM
 
Location: Deep in the Woods
2,570 posts, read 2,690,292 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
This book was based on a 1995 essay by the same author. This is simply nostalgia.

Look at how Amazon hypes it:
**Drawing on vast new data that reveal Americans’ changing behavior, Putnam shows how we have become increasingly disconnected from one another and how social structures—whether they be PTA, church, or political parties—have disintegrated. Until the publication of this groundbreaking work, no one had so deftly diagnosed the harm that these broken bonds have wreaked on our physical and civic health, nor had anyone exalted their fundamental power in creating a society that is happy, healthy, and safe.

Like defining works from the past, such as The Lonely Crowd and The Affluent Society, and like the works of C. Wright Mills and Betty Friedan, Putnam’s Bowling Alone has identified a central crisis at the heart of our society and suggests what we can do.


Barf!

Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community: Robert D. Putnam: 9780743203043: Amazon.com: Books

What is so "communal" about a drive-in movie? You go in your private auto, stick a speaker in the window, watch the movie and drive home. Not much different than watching a movie in your living room.

I never was much of a bowler, but when we drove by the local bowling alley last night, it seemed plenty crowded.

Why should we always go to the ice cream shop for an ice cream? Ever since people have had freezers, they've had ice cream in them. Don't get it!

We have several popular flea markets here in the Denver area. Another "don't get it".

The kids in my neighborhood play outside. I don't know about the OP's.

We don't have a lot of lakes around here, and they're very cold.

Agree with the poster who talked about vegetable stands. There are a number of them here in Boulder County, CO. Also, every little town and big city has a farmer's market these days, so it seems.
I happen to think there is some merit to what this author has written. I don't think its simply one persons opinion, as the author has backed up some of his beliefs with researched data. Regardless, I haven't read the book, so I can't really comment on it, beyond what I was able to read on Amazon.

Clearly, in many parts of the country, clubs like The Elks, Knights of Columbus, gun clubs, etc are certainly dying off. I would say that here, where I am, bowling alleys, drive-ins, bookstores, local coffee shops, mini-golf, etc have mostly gone away, relplaced by Walmarts, housing, and strip malls (with the usual nail salon, dry cleaner, pizza place, and Chinese food restaurant).

If you believe that this is just simply nostalgia or sentimentality, that's your right. I'm arguing that by losing these pastimes, our social connection to others is being lost.
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Old 09-23-2013, 07:54 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,071 posts, read 102,800,958 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VintageSunlight View Post
I happen to think there is some merit to what this author has written. I don't think its simply one persons opinion, as the author has backed up some of his beliefs with researched data. Regardless, I haven't read the book, so I can't really comment on it, beyond what I was able to read on Amazon.

Clearly, in many parts of the country, clubs like The Elks, Knights of Columbus, gun clubs, etc are certainly dying off. I would say that here, where I am, bowling alleys, drive-ins, bookstores, local coffee shops, mini-golf, etc have mostly gone away, relplaced by Walmarts, housing, and strip malls (with the usual nail salon, dry cleaner, pizza place, and Chinese food restaurant).

If you believe that this is just simply nostalgia or sentimentality, that's your right. I'm arguing that by losing these pastimes, our social connection to others is being lost.
I haven't read the book, either, although I had heard of it. I may take it out of the library. I read some of the reviews. The author blames the change on three things (according to the reviews): cars, TV, and the entry of women into the workforce. As someone pointed out, cars actually enabled people to be more social, and I will note, cars spawned the drive-ins. TV, yeah, people sat in their living rooms instead of going to the movies, to a certain extent. But having lived in the early years of my life w/o a TV, my family didn't go to movies in the pre-TV era either. Maybe people read more weekly magazines like "The Saturday Evening Post", etc. I don't know.

Women entering the workforce certainly changed society, but I'm not sure for the worse. According to one of the reviews, in the early days of the women's movement, when I was just a college student, the mantra was that women should quit volunteering. Indeed, I had a boss who felt that volunteer workers took work away from paid people. Granted, a lot of church and civic organizations ran with volunteer labor, mostly performed by women. Still, when my kids were in school, there were always plenty of parent volunteers, sometimes too many. My friends/neighbors that have kids in school now are still volunteering. Just this morning, my friend who works in the health room of an elementary school told me she put out a plea for volunteers for the hearing/vision screening, and got too many. Another neighbor volunteers at the local high school, where her daughter goes. Sports teams, Sunday Schools, and the like always need parent volunteers. One woman at my church who is retired is very active in the local Rotary club. I'm just not seeing it.
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Old 09-23-2013, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Terramaria
777 posts, read 847,907 times
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One of the problems in recent years is that some pastimes have outpaced inflation, especially Theme Park tickets, some sports events, club/class membership fees, music concerts (except for some Fine Art performances in which the younger generations seem less interested in), bowling, and to a lesser degree movie tickets and going out due to higher gas prices. Most of what's described is still around if you know where to look. But it seems that people want to get the most milage out of what they paid for the technology so they don't feel that it is a waste of money.
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Old 09-23-2013, 09:46 AM
 
Location: Pacific NW
6,413 posts, read 10,410,368 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VintageSunlight View Post
I think different regions have different pastimes. I was mostly speaking in general about my area, but I think people can relate to some aspects of what I've seen in my town, in their town. For example, we still have tons of pizza places here, locally owned. When I lived in the South, most of the pizza places were chains.

Another example of a regional difference are the number of drive-in theatres in PA and Upstate NY. Whereas in my state, there's only one left. As land is so expensive here, drive-in's don't make it here. They are not making it well even in cheaper areas.

But I'm glad to hear that these pastimes are not gone everywhere. Perhaps this area has been harder hit by this, again due to the pressure from housing and development and not much space.
Well, drive-ins are the only thing we're missing from your list, here in Portland. But they died a natural death pretty much by the 70s, more than being forced out. They weren't all that popular, given our rainy winters and our long summer days. During the summer, when the weather's great and dry, it doesn't get dark until about 10pm. So bottom line, ... they just weren't that popular.

Though one of my everlasting memories is of sitting in the back of a car with my grandmother and great-grandmother in the front, seeing Gone With the Wind for the first time at our local drive-in.
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Old 09-23-2013, 10:55 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee, WI
174 posts, read 201,725 times
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Kids don't even play outside anymore. When I was a kid we used to play games in the street, walk around the neighborhood, and hang out on the corner, at the local school, or down at the creek. Now you take a casual drive through most neighborhoods and you never even see anyone outside, even in summer. That goes for parents too.

The big, multi-lane bowling alleys are gone. Now smaller bar-type bowling alleys seem to be the thing.

Drive-ins are very seasonal, maybe that's why there's so few now, if any.
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Old 09-23-2013, 11:06 PM
 
6,127 posts, read 6,459,382 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ALR4929 View Post
Kids don't even play outside anymore. When I was a kid we used to play games in the street, walk around the neighborhood, and hang out on the corner, at the local school, or down at the creek. Now you take a casual drive through most neighborhoods and you never even see anyone outside, even in summer. That goes for parents too.

The big, multi-lane bowling alleys are gone. Now smaller bar-type bowling alleys seem to be the thing.

Drive-ins are very seasonal, maybe that's why there's so few now, if any.
There is a drive-in that opened in my area last summer. Obviously it's seasonal, but it seems to be doing pretty well. I've heard they even give out treat bags when you bring your dog.

I don't live in a neighborhood so I don't know how often, if at all, kids here play outside. However, just in the two and a half years I've lived here, the city has really been working to revitalize the downtown area. They built a town square that is pretty popular. They have festivals/events year round, interactive fountains that you can run through in the summer, an ice skating rink in the winter. Every Thursday night in the summer, they close off a couple downtown blocks and have a festival with two different bands, food and drink, activities for kids, etc. Every Monday night in the summer they show a free outdoor movie in the square. The events are always pretty popular, and even when there aren't events going on, you see a lot more people/families milling around and taking advantage of the free/low-cost activities.


I think a lot of kids are involved in organized sports here. A coworker's kids play softball, and apparently there are so many kids playing that new facilities really need to be built. People seem to get outside and do things here.
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