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Old 10-31-2013, 02:20 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,316,376 times
Reputation: 36087

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Octa View Post
I agree. For a lot of people it's important to step outside of their cultural comfort zones and interact with people who come from backgrounds different from their own. It's one of the best ways to combat prejudice in a country that's become increasingly afraid to discuss race and culture.
That's fine for you (and "a lot of people")to say, but a majority (possibly a very large majority) of people are ill-equipped to function positively in a city with high diversity, and see diversity a threat that needs to be overcome, which generates stress and anxiety. So diversity is not necessarily a good thing that serves or impacts a community positively.

It's fine to use diversity as a tool to improve the quality of your own life (in a sense, selfishly exploiting diversity), but not everyone "stepping outside their cultural comfort zones" can go in their house and close the door, shutting diversity out when it is not useful. Get up early some morning and stand lin line for a few hours at a food distribution center, and see what kinds of people are not being served well by diversity.

There, see? I'm not "afraid to discuss race and culture", even when my opinions are not sensitive enough for some people..
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Old 11-01-2013, 10:06 PM
 
Location: London, NYC, DC
1,118 posts, read 1,972,778 times
Reputation: 650
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I don't think anyone has mentioned it but for a lot of people the diversity of their cities is worn like a badge of moral virtue.

"Look at us! We've welcomed all of these people from all over the world to our city with open arms! Aren't we great!"
^ This. I feel like people brag about diversity to make themselves appear open-minded. In my experience living in three diverse cities (New York, DC and London), these same people rarely, if ever, actually interact on a more than sharing-the-same-subway-car or going-to-an-ethnic-restaurant level, which really makes me question their motives. These are probably also the same people who would claim that a city that's 50% black is inherently more diverse than a 100% white city full of every possible ethnicity (British, French, Russian, Australian, Serbian, Portuguese etc). If you have to talk about diversity, chances are you care too much about race.
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Old 11-02-2013, 11:17 AM
 
Location: Center City
6,865 posts, read 7,813,769 times
Reputation: 9492
Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
What is the deal with this obsession everyone has over race?

Why does it matter how diverse a city is? and why do people care so much about what race their neighbors are?
I am white. I am not obsessed with race, but I have always lived with, gone to school with and worked with people of different races. I like being exposed to people of different cultures. I would not enjoy going to some gated encase where everyone else is white.

If this means I am "obsessed" with race, so be it.
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Old 11-03-2013, 10:31 AM
 
1,356 posts, read 1,637,195 times
Reputation: 1035
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC;32031594[B
]My experience is people want to live with other people of the same income level and they don't care about your color, religion or sexual preference as long as you are in the same income bracket as they are.[/b]

People who pat themselves on their back for racial diversity usually, in my opinion, don't tolerate diversity of opinion.
Research in cognitive psychology shows us that people are very much color conscious even if they want to pretend like they're colorblind and espouse racial egalitarian beliefs and that applies to housing as well. There is ongoing implicit discrimination that goes in housing and real estate where minority groups are directed away from inclusive neighborhoods or they receive a loan with an higher interest rate despite their credit rating ceteris paribus. People do see color when they're choosing what neighborhood to live in or move out of. What's interesting is how much it applies to people in higher income brackets.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
That's fine for you (and "a lot of people")to say, but a majority (possibly a very large majority) of people are ill-equipped to function positively in a city with high diversity, and see diversity a threat that needs to be overcome, which generates stress and anxiety. So diversity is not necessarily a good thing that serves or impacts a community positively.

It's fine to use diversity as a tool to improve the quality of your own life (in a sense, selfishly exploiting diversity), but not everyone "stepping outside their cultural comfort zones" can go in their house and close the door, shutting diversity out when it is not useful. Get up early some morning and stand lin line for a few hours at a food distribution center, and see what kinds of people are not being served well by diversity.

There, see? I'm not "afraid to discuss race and culture", even when my opinions are not sensitive enough for some people..

I think people are ill equipped to handle ethnic and cultural diversity because the new lingo is the pretend like we don't notice these things and everyone is treated equally when that isn't the case. These are some of the most difficult things to really talk about since it often means coming to terms with our prejudices.

I don't really understand the line about the food distribution, but not choosing to ignore something like race which has become the norm, would go a long way in addressing the racial inequities that exist. Marginalized groups such as latinos, african americans, and indigenous peoples all face challenges that are specific to those groups and just trying to apply blanket colorblind policies to them all will not do much to reverse historic social engineering.
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Old 11-03-2013, 03:11 PM
 
Location: The Great Outdoors
442 posts, read 689,048 times
Reputation: 573
You'll notice, OP, that most of these race threads are started by the same guy on like 40 different accounts.
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Old 11-04-2013, 10:47 PM
 
1,324 posts, read 2,057,976 times
Reputation: 1037
Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
What is the deal with this obsession everyone has over race? you can visit the Toronto vs Houston forum and pretty much 70 percent of the post are people repeating how diverse each city is.

Why does it matter how diverse a city is? and why do people care so much about what race their neighbors are?
Diversity in race is a good thing, but on this board its used as a shallow barometer to define how "open-minded/liberal" people are, and gets downright silly when people list out stats on the 2 Foreign Born Hmong folks living in their metro area.
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Old 11-05-2013, 03:25 PM
 
Location: classified
1,680 posts, read 3,187,014 times
Reputation: 1530
Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
Diversity teaches you. It was a great thing to live in a diverse city like Houston coming from a majority black and white city like mine.
Diversity means more than just race.

If you have an entire city population that was racially diverse consisting of middle class families who have lived their entire lives in the US, I would argue it would be less diverse than say a place that was racially homogenous but had people from a wide variety of income backgrounds and/or sexual orientations.
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Old 11-05-2013, 05:55 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
5,656 posts, read 7,456,800 times
Reputation: 4327
Quote:
Originally Posted by Octa View Post
I agree. For a lot of people it's important to step outside of their cultural comfort zones and interact with people who come from backgrounds different from their own. It's one of the best ways to combat prejudice in a country that's become increasingly afraid to discuss race and culture.
When it comes to seeking equality, it seems as though people are more concerned about highlighting differences and injustices rather than similarities and strengths.
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Old 11-06-2013, 05:43 PM
 
1,356 posts, read 1,637,195 times
Reputation: 1035
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZLiam View Post
When it comes to seeking equality, it seems as though people are more concerned about highlighting differences and injustices rather than similarities and strengths.
It's important to highlight differences and injustices because they still persist and people are very adamant about ignoring injustices that still persist to this day. You can't have equity if no one is willing to confront them and use help alleviate inequities. A good example are the studies done about the discrimination against people with ethnic sounding names in employment especially with african american sounding names. It's a very subtle form of racism that's hard to single out on an individual basis, but when you look at it in the aggregate, you find that's there and it's real. The unintended consequence of colorblind universalism manifests itself today in how certain groups are thought to be morally and intellectually inferior. Universalism ends the public debate about race even though we live in a society that is still socialized to stereotype and prejudge certain groups. Racism didn't go away; it just became more covert.

I recommend checking out Project Implicit, a Harvard research project and non-profit that studies our implicit biases and prejudices. If you're interested in anything else involving race, racism, and how US society continues to structure itself around race, then please PM me.
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Old 11-10-2013, 10:35 PM
 
9 posts, read 6,008 times
Reputation: 15
It's discussed way too much on these boards in my view. Just throwing my opinion out there.
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