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Old 09-27-2013, 06:00 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Anyway, I was trying to say that there is a stronger German presence in Upstate NY and in PA than people realize. They tend to be more assimilated, but for some, the ties are still pretty strong. We actually have German clubs/festivals up here. In my area, many moved to the Northern suburbs(especially the Liverpool area) from the North Side of Syracuse, as the Italian population grew on that side of town.
When I think of "Germans" in Pennsylvania, I think of Amish Country. Growing up in Philadelphia, I never knew anyone who really identified with their German ancestry. German, in my view, is no different from being any other type of "white." It wasn't like the Irish who had a very conspicuous presence in the Northeast, Grays Ferry, etc. Where would I go to find the "German" presence in Philadelphia? It's certainly not Germantown.
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Old 09-27-2013, 06:04 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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This was a good laugh.

Quote:
We visited Philadelphia last week and were eagerly looking forward to a nice German meal in Germantown. I was anticipating authentic German potato salad, freshly cooked spaetle (my favorite side dishes), and maybe a couple wursts, all washed down with some tasty German suds. So, we located it on the map and drove north from Center City.

Well obviously, we did not find any German restaurants. In fact, we did not see a single German person.

Apparently, it is an historic town, formerly occupied by German descendents, but no longer represented in the current residency. I guess we’ll forage for our German food elsewhere.
Germantown: Longtime Resident Talks About His Neighborhood

LOL.
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Old 09-27-2013, 06:08 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
When I think of "Germans" in Pennsylvania, I think of Amish Country. Growing up in Philadelphia, I never knew anyone who really identified with their German ancestry. German, in my view, is no different from being any other type of "white." It wasn't like the Irish who had a very conspicuous presence in the Northeast, Gray's Ferry, etc. Where would I go to find the "German" presence in Philadelphia? It's certainly not Germantown.
You don't have to go far out of Philly to get a higher German %: Lancaster, York and Adams Counties are 40% German. Nowhere else in the Northeast. I never found Irish all that distinctive, either. People identified with being Irish, but there wasn't that much distinctive about them, except maybe family history. Italians felt a bit more culturally distinct.

Some of the Germans I met from Pennsylvania did seem to identify with being German, more so than many Irish-Americans.
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Old 09-27-2013, 06:12 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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As for why Irish tended to stay in port cities more so than other immigrants of the era (German or British, for example). Most Irish were destitute, fleeing Ireland in desperation. They didn't have the money to go any further inland, nor to acquire farmland further west. The big northeastern cities generally had a glut of labor with all the immigration, so wages for unskilled workers were low compared to further inland. Which help give the association of the Irish with poverty.

I wouldn't be surprised if Irish-Americans are better off than average compared to white Americans, simply from living in wealthier regions of the country.
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Old 09-27-2013, 06:15 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
You don't have to go far out of Philly to get a higher German %: Lancaster, York and Adams Counties are 40% German. Nowhere else in the Northeast. I never found Irish all that distinctive, either. People identified with being Irish, but there wasn't that much distinctive about them, except maybe family history. Italians felt a bit more culturally distinct.
That's true. I'd say more distinctive than Germans, but less distinctive than Italians. The fact that I can name actual Irish neighborhoods in Philly (but not German ones) says it all. The Irish are a bit like Jamaicans in that they make their presence known (that is, if you've had much contact with Jamaicans...much more conspicuous than other West Indians).

In Boston, I thought the Irish feel was overwhelming.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Some of the Germans I met from Pennsylvania did seem to identify with being German, more so than many Irish-Americans.
I've never seen that before. Philadelphia has historically had an Irish voting bloc. We even had campaign stickers that said "O'Bama." Never saw anything for Germans in Philly.
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Old 09-27-2013, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Interesting video. He only mentions Italians, Irish, Blacks, Jews and Poles. But he grew up in South Philly.


Ethnic Neighborhoods in 1950s Philadelphia - YouTube

Anybody know where the Germans were? Other than in Germantown back in 1681. According to the Census, there are nearly as many Germans in Philly as there are Italians.
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Old 09-27-2013, 11:44 PM
 
Location: south central
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Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
Makes sense. Philly area is more Protestant than Boston I think due to loads more African Americans. It is noticeable how few blacks you see in downtown Boston compared to downtown Philadelphia. Another way Baltimore and Philly are very similar.
Oh great another "few blacks in downtown" Boston comment. Anyway, on to my actual point:

Generally, yes. Boston's black population is 25% and Philadelphia's is 45%. Plus, Philadelphia's proper population is 1.525 million while Boston's proper population is 640K. So this is all if we include NONE of the suburbs. Boston's black population is 160,000 while Philly's is about 650,000. That's more than the population of Boston.

All that being said, Boston also has a high black Catholic population because of it's prominent and growing Haitian population, which I'm only cements the city's Catholic status.
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Old 09-28-2013, 08:29 PM
 
56,645 posts, read 80,952,685 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
When I think of "Germans" in Pennsylvania, I think of Amish Country. Growing up in Philadelphia, I never knew anyone who really identified with their German ancestry. German, in my view, is no different from being any other type of "white." It wasn't like the Irish who had a very conspicuous presence in the Northeast, Grays Ferry, etc. Where would I go to find the "German" presence in Philadelphia? It's certainly not Germantown.
That is why I said that Germans tend to be more assimilated up here and in much of the Northeast. There are Amish and Mennonites up here too. Many of the more rural counties in Upstate NY can be in the 20-30% German range. Lewis County, which has quite a few Mennonites is around 30% German. So, you can find areas with pretty high German percentages in the region.
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Old 09-28-2013, 10:11 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
That's true. I'd say more distinctive than Germans, but less distinctive than Italians. The fact that I can name actual Irish neighborhoods in Philly (but not German ones) says it all. The Irish are a bit like Jamaicans in that they make their presence known (that is, if you've had much contact with Jamaicans...much more conspicuous than other West Indians).

In Boston, I thought the Irish feel was overwhelming.



I've never seen that before. Philadelphia has historically had an Irish voting bloc. We even had campaign stickers that said "O'Bama." Never saw anything for Germans in Philly.

I've known tons of white Philadelphians that have part German heritage. The Germans came to the US, for the most part, earlier than other European immigrants. Mid 1800's for a lot of them. They are more assimilated, but still many, many whites in Philly have part German ancestry. I know a fair number myself.

Olney was a heavily German community. The Catholics there went to Incarnation Parish and St. Helena. Fair number of German Lutherans in that hood as well. Another German Catholic parish was St. Boniface in Kensington. They had masses there in German into the 70's.
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Old 09-28-2013, 10:15 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
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Originally Posted by tahiti View Post
Nearly everyone in my hometown in northern NJ was either Irish or Italian (you had a few Jews, and Slovaks but they were the exception). I am Irish. The Irish went to one parish, the Italians went to another, same with the pediatrician, the Irish kids went to Dr. Cassidy, the Italian kids went to Dr. Alonzo. Everyone got along. It's changed dramatically since I was a kid and I laugh thinking back.

Do you think people in the South that claim Irish ancestry are "Irish" as we know it? I find it laughable to meet these Irish down South and they and their families have been Baptist fundamentalists their whole lives. Sorry, that just doesn't jive with just about every single Irish-American I've known in my life.
I am almost 99% sure they are Scotch-Irish. A completely different ethnicity.
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