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Old 09-26-2013, 12:39 PM
 
Location: The City
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Old 09-26-2013, 12:41 PM
 
Location: The City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
True, but I'm sure some Irish had to have left the city too. From the stats, it's obvious that Italians have left at a higher rate, but why?
I think it has to do with the Northeast (NE Philly) where there are more Irish in the relative sense and less left. Some migration accross the board but S Jersey had a large influx of Italians wheras the other counties PA are more balanced

S Philly is becoming more gentrified, esp North of Washington and an influx of asians and hispanics South of Wash (most pronounced East of Broad) in what were very traditionally Italian neighborhoods

Just look at all the new Pho and Taquarias in the 9th street market and gastro pubs in Bella Vista and QV, even G-ho
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Old 09-26-2013, 12:46 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
I think it has to do with the Northeast (NE Philly) where there are more Irish in the relative sense and less left. Some migration accross the board but S Jersey had a large influx of Italians wheras the other counties PA are more balanced
I have no data to back this up (which means I'll have to search for it at some point), but anecdotally, I feel that Italians tend to leave the region altogether (at least more than the Irish do). When I look at my Facebook page, I'm like "Oh, such and such's mom lives in Florida now" and "Oh wow, I didn't know your parents moved to Arizona." It seems that Italians are a bit more anxious to get to warmer climates. But again, this is based on my own personal observation, not empirical evidence.
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Old 09-26-2013, 12:46 PM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
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Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
South Jersey, like the new South Philly

Places like Marlton, Deptford, Swedesboro etc.
Your definitely correct with that statement, especially towns like Washington Township and Hammonton.
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Old 09-26-2013, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
S Philly is becoming more gentrified, esp North of Washington and an influx of asians and hispanics South of Wash (most pronounced East of Broad) in what were very traditionally Italian neighborhoods

Just look at all the new Pho and Taquarias in the 9th street market and gastro pubs in Bella Vista and QV, even G-ho
So what you're saying is that the traditional Italian stronghold in Philly has undergone more dramatic demographic change than the traditional Irish stronghold in Philly. Yeah, I can buy that. Particularly since South Philly is so close to Center City (one reason). The influx of Asian and Hispanic immigrants is also another factor, as you mentioned. The Northeast is also growing more diverse, but I think it's taken a bit longer for that to happen.

Although South Philly was definitely the heart of the city's Italian community, I think many people don't even realize that Southwest, West and Northwest Philadelphia were home to sizeable Italian-American communities. Overbrook (west of 63rd) was still largely Italian until the 90s. And Vincent's is still serving kick ass pizza after all these years.
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Old 09-26-2013, 12:59 PM
 
Location: The City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
So what you're saying is that the traditional Italian stronghold in Philly has undergone more dramatic demographic change than the traditional Irish stronghold in Philly. Yeah, I can buy that. Particularly since South Philly is so close to Center City (one reason). The influx of Asian and Hispanic immigrants is also another factor, as you mentioned. The Northeast is also growing more diverse, but I think it's taken a bit longer for that to happen.
Yeah and the Far NE, say North of Frankford is still largely unchanged and highly Irish

S Philly while still a strong Italian element is slowly to moderately turning over to yuppies and immigrants
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Old 09-26-2013, 01:03 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
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Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
That's what many people on here say, but I rarely see the data to back it up.

I wouldn't dispute that Baltimore is more Catholic than Charleston. But Philadelphia is way more Catholic than Baltimore. Not only is the Archdiocese of Philadelphia larger, but the percentage of Catholics within its jurisdiction is much, much, much higher than Baltimore's (39 vs. 16-17 percent...still much larger even after excluding Hispanics and Filipinos). Maryland also has a historical peculiarity in that it has quite a number of English Catholics (who founded the state) as well as a number of African American Catholics (who account for nearly 20 percent of the state's Catholics).
The Archdiocese of Baltimore is the first (and oldest) Diocese in the US.
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Old 09-26-2013, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
Yeah and the Far NE, say North of Frankford is still largely unchanged and highly Irish

S Philly while still a strong Italian element is slowly to moderately turning over to yuppies and immigrants
I ate at Stogie Joe's last year (I get to S. Philly about once every two years) and was surprised to see Italians period. I knew there were yuppies, but I thought it would be 115% yuppified. But there were still some Italians left. More Asians. But enough Italians where it was noticeable to both me and the people I was showing around town. It wasn't like Mulberry Street where the only thing close to being authentically Italian are the Prada bags you see.
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Old 09-26-2013, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,248 posts, read 26,214,003 times
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Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
The Archdiocese of Baltimore is the first (and oldest) Diocese in the US.
And? What does that have to do with the data I posted?
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Old 09-26-2013, 01:15 PM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,138,839 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I ate at Stogie Joe's last year (I get to S. Philly about once every two years) and was surprised to see Italians period. I knew there were yuppies, but I thought it would be 115% yuppified. But there were still some Italians left. More Asians. But enough Italians where it was noticeable to both me and the people I was showing around town. It wasn't like Mulberry Street where the only thing close to being authentically Italian are the Prada bags you see.

Well if nothing else you should get back more often for the food. Still great Italian but now a ton new BYOs in Passyunk (all varieties) and some great mexican and asian food not to mention some really good beer, scotch, whickey, and gastro pub selections.

You can grab some really Pho and walk a block and get some dessert at Terminis or Ishgro for some of the best Canoli anywhere - quite the concentration of really good ethnic foods and quite a variety really. Not sure how many visitors (or even the Rittenhouse crowd) ever venture in but well worth the culninary visit - sadly no real good Irish food in the area, but just about anything else
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