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Old 09-30-2013, 09:01 PM
 
Location: IN
20,846 posts, read 35,937,611 times
Reputation: 13287

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Quote:
Originally Posted by s.davis View Post
Hard trolling. You confuse better with "I prefer", and it comes across as a biased juvenile hang-up...because it is. As is your ad nauseum repeating of your tired and misguided trope about the lower midwest not being a real part of the true midwest.

And if your hypothesis is that attracting coastal implants is a litmus test for "better", or having things "in common" with the "core midwest" you should revisit the in-migration stats for Kansas City...

And for the record, Maine is quite lovely, but lots of people do not want to live there. Or they would. In fact, the amount of people who do not want to live in Maine so grossly overwhelms the amount of people who do that its hardly worth mentioning, and if you weren't so willfully obtuse, I wouldn't bother.
I've done extensive research on many different possible places that I would "prefer" to move to before I even began looking for new positions. Madison is the best medium sized metro in the Midwest in the categories that matter to most people. Large cities= lower quality of life for things that I do enjoy. Others prefer the offerings of the largest metros and that is fine.

Maine has good potential down the road as it has good natural resources, plenty of fresh water, an increasingly vibrant city in Portland that does quite well for its size. The biggest issue with Maine is that it does lack good access to other areas of the country as the Portland Jetport has a more limited selection of flights, and one often ends up having to fly out of Logan. Cost of living and tax burden reduces growth of Maine, but New Hampshire offers a much lower tax burden to enjoy the nice things Maine has to offer nearb.
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Old 10-01-2013, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Washington, DC area
10,842 posts, read 19,416,924 times
Reputation: 5700
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nanox View Post
Is it actually possible for you to make a post on this forum about Kansas City, in which you do not alienate it from its own region? Every single post you make about Kansas City is how "different" it is from the "core midwest." No wonder people in KC are known to have an inferiority complex. You have people from outside the Midwest telling them how flat, dull, and boring their city is (even when they've never been there), and then YOU spewing this garbage all over the internet on how KC is a completely different world from the Midwest. Get a grip.

Oh, and go ahead and delete this post, like you did with my other one, if it hurts your feelings.
I would agree that KC is 100% Midwestern. It's not southern at all, it's not northern or western. The southwest suburbs have somewhat of a southwestern or even soCal feel to them in places. I can see them feeling more like the suburbs of LA or Phoenix or Denver than the suburbs of Cleveland or Indy for example, but that's about it. Urban KCMO especially is more eastern than west, even though its surrounded by suburbs that are could be more western and southwest type suburbs.

If that makes any sense at all haha.
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Old 10-01-2013, 11:14 AM
 
Location: IN
20,846 posts, read 35,937,611 times
Reputation: 13287
Quote:
Originally Posted by kcmo View Post
I would agree that KC is 100% Midwestern. It's not southern at all, it's not northern or western. The southwest suburbs have somewhat of a southwestern or even soCal feel to them in places. I can see them feeling more like the suburbs of LA or Phoenix or Denver than the suburbs of Cleveland or Indy for example, but that's about it. Urban KCMO especially is more eastern than west, even though its surrounded by suburbs that are could be more western and southwest type suburbs.

If that makes any sense at all haha.
I probably prefer Midwestern "northern" then. KC is lacking enough northern influences to be noticeable.
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Old 10-01-2013, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Center City
6,851 posts, read 7,797,618 times
Reputation: 9469
Quote:
Originally Posted by kcmo View Post
I would agree that KC is 100% Midwestern. It's not southern at all, it's not northern or western. The southwest suburbs have somewhat of a southwestern or even soCal feel to them in places. I can see them feeling more like the suburbs of LA or Phoenix or Denver than the suburbs of Cleveland or Indy for example, but that's about it. Urban KCMO especially is more eastern than west, even though its surrounded by suburbs that are could be more western and southwest type suburbs.

If that makes any sense at all haha.
I grew up on the east coast and KC was the first city I lived in away from the region. Though it's been many years, I felt KC was definitely midwestern when I moved there. I didn't pick up eastern sensibilities at all with its wide boulevards, lack of row houses, room to sprawl a bit, and some pretty deep country once you left the urban area. I remember my first trip to St Louis which felt very eastern in feel to me - parts of it made me feel I was almost like Philly. The midwestern cities of St Louis, Cincinnati, and Cleveland share similar eastern feel while retaining a solid midwestern sensibility. And of course, Chicago is its own thing.

My impressions - YMMV of course.

Last edited by Pine to Vine; 10-01-2013 at 01:44 PM..
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Old 10-01-2013, 06:16 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC area
10,842 posts, read 19,416,924 times
Reputation: 5700
Quote:
Originally Posted by jm02 View Post
I grew up on the east coast and KC was the first city I lived in away from the region. Though it's been many years, I felt KC was definitely midwestern when I moved there. I didn't pick up eastern sensibilities at all with its wide boulevards, lack of row houses, room to sprawl a bit, and some pretty deep country once you left the urban area. I remember my first trip to St Louis which felt very eastern in feel to me - parts of it made me feel I was almost like Philly. The midwestern cities of St Louis, Cincinnati, and Cleveland share similar eastern feel while retaining a solid midwestern sensibility. And of course, Chicago is its own thing.

My impressions - YMMV of course.
I understand what you are saying and I agree. I was comparing KC to places like Denver, OKC, Phoenix etc. You could probably go either way with KCMO, it really is the city where it turns from east to west, but it is neither.
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Old 11-08-2013, 09:51 PM
 
Location: Pacific NW
6,413 posts, read 10,385,558 times
Reputation: 5806
Quote:
Originally Posted by sadgirl80 View Post
It still surprises me how shockingly little many people on the coasts know about anything outside their own tiny worlds. They aren't only ignorant about the "flyover states", they are ignorant of the other coast too! So I don't expect such people to know about other countries and cultures. I wonder if they have all been collectively sleeping through grade school.

It's sad indeed, I agree with you. Most of the non coastal states I know have bigger and more vibrant cities than the states close to them. Who the hell wants to live in say, Maine? Lol
Climb on down off that high horse, and don' tmake such sweeping generalizations ...

As for Kansas City ... is it the one (mostly) in Jackson County, Missouri or in Wyandotte County, Kansas that is the one us old ignorant coasters don't know about?
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Old 11-09-2013, 07:28 AM
 
363 posts, read 617,253 times
Reputation: 281
Having been there, I'd say KC is very midwestern, but it's history is the only thing that is somewhat southern since Jesse James was from the region and there were a number of civil war skirmishes in the region. Other than that it feels more midwestern. In some ways it leans west (The American Royal, ties to Kansas and Nebraska, and the whole cattle drive and stockyard history), but it also leans east (Really strong Mafia influence in the 20th century, boss pendergast and the machine politics, extremely effected by the great migration), and also its barbecue while southern influence, is from what I hear hated by southerners, or at least not as well liked.
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