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Old 07-02-2015, 01:46 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
25,029 posts, read 23,924,861 times
Reputation: 30917

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Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
When does the air quality get bad and how long does it last? i hear it can get really bad there at times.

Salt Lake City seems like such a beautiful city to me and i really wanna move their in the future.
I've been there (their) a few times because my Aunt, Uncle and cousins lived in Ogden. It was a nice looking city, but I never wanted to live there. Not sure why, but it seemed really sterile to me.
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Old 07-02-2015, 01:53 AM
 
563 posts, read 384,648 times
Reputation: 1158
Being from California, I don't consider if a place is North or South. I just go anywhere I want to go to. I find people all over America fairly friendly. I like the way the people talk in the south. I think everyone does, even if they would never admit it. Northern people seem like winners on game shows. Very quick with answers and typically correct in answering whatever the question may be. Mid-West people make me think of farms and dairy products. Love the Wisconsin State Fair, I like the farming aspect of the region. The West. Amazing forrest, deserts and coastline. Gambling is best done in Vegas. San Diego, LA, SF, Seattle and Portland. All amazingly beautiful cities on the water.

There are many more great features of all of these regions, but that would take forever to write. So to answer your question, it is all the same but with nice subtle differences.
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Old 07-02-2015, 02:32 AM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,099 posts, read 4,737,517 times
Reputation: 5374
There are bigots in every state of all walks of life towards every possible target.

I say we ignore those people.

Truth is Americans are not very different from one another regardless of regional distinctions. Rural people from New England are the same as rural people from Alabama they just pronounce things differently. Sometimes I think people in this country put too much emphasis on the piddly differences rather than bonding over the myriad similarities.

We really do see our nation as a world unto itself sometimes.
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Old 07-02-2015, 10:07 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,512 posts, read 17,740,343 times
Reputation: 30801
Quote:
Originally Posted by JGMotorsport64 View Post
As a native Southwesterner I view the Northeast as an elitist Mecca of "well on the East Coast we..."
I have been working in Ohio and got called out for saying, "Well, in New Mexico we..."

Whoops.
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Old 03-14-2016, 12:26 PM
 
1 posts, read 759 times
Reputation: 17
As a Southerner who has lived in New England for fifteen years, some thoughts:

When did "settling for less" become a bad thing? Are southerners being criticized for being less consumeristic, less materialistic? In those comments I find a a bias that blames Southerners for a fundamental value. The South has also, since the Civil War (no blame) been less economically affluent, and generations may have learned to "be happy with less," a value that is now often touted in popular media.

I had no negative biases on moving to New England. In fact, I had bought into the idea they were more liberal, more educated, etc.

What I found: actually more narrow minded and more underlying racism, crass materialism, exploitive business mentality and dishonest business practices, very antiquated and oppressive gender expectations for women, an underlying, seething sense of anger that erupts at any moment in passive aggressive - this in both institutions and organizations. I also found people less well-travelled, less worldly than my hometown in the deep, DEEP South.

I want to be clear, this is what I found in the same socio-economic classes and people of similar educations.

After fifteen years, I decided that generations of economic hardship and the civil rights movement may have transformed the deep south, and the culture and my generation benefited greatly, whereas people in New England weren't forced to advance their culture or their mentality by such experiences. I'd bet that someone from N.E. today is no different from someone of the same age fifty or sixty years ago.

What's interesting is that migration patterns show people leaving N.E. for ... (wait for it) the Deep South of all places. I'm curious as to the cultural changes in N.E. that will take place when this drain of human potential starts to create problems.
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Old 03-14-2016, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
8,729 posts, read 7,686,254 times
Reputation: 7650
Quote:
Originally Posted by e.p.b. View Post
As a Southerner who has lived in New England for fifteen years, some thoughts:

When did "settling for less" become a bad thing? Are southerners being criticized for being less consumeristic, less materialistic? In those comments I find a a bias that blames Southerners for a fundamental value. The South has also, since the Civil War (no blame) been less economically affluent, and generations may have learned to "be happy with less," a value that is now often touted in popular media.

I had no negative biases on moving to New England. In fact, I had bought into the idea they were more liberal, more educated, etc.

What I found: actually more narrow minded and more underlying racism, crass materialism, exploitive business mentality and dishonest business practices, very antiquated and oppressive gender expectations for women, an underlying, seething sense of anger that erupts at any moment in passive aggressive - this in both institutions and organizations. I also found people less well-travelled, less worldly than my hometown in the deep, DEEP South.

I want to be clear, this is what I found in the same socio-economic classes and people of similar educations.

After fifteen years, I decided that generations of economic hardship and the civil rights movement may have transformed the deep south, and the culture and my generation benefited greatly, whereas people in New England weren't forced to advance their culture or their mentality by such experiences. I'd bet that someone from N.E. today is no different from someone of the same age fifty or sixty years ago.

What's interesting is that migration patterns show people leaving N.E. for ... (wait for it) the Deep South of all places. I'm curious as to the cultural changes in N.E. that will take place when this drain of human potential starts to create problems.
I have no response other than that description doesn't sound anything like the New England I live in.
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Old 03-14-2016, 04:38 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,137 posts, read 9,909,375 times
Reputation: 6424
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjimmy24 View Post
I have no response other than that description doesn't sound anything like the New England I live in.
Actually it does not sound like the New England that anyone actually lives in. Notice that someone started an Alt to post it?
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Old 03-14-2016, 05:31 PM
 
1,830 posts, read 1,253,759 times
Reputation: 1822
Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
Actually it does not sound like the New England that anyone actually lives in. Notice that someone started an Alt to post it?
I'm not that posted, but I had a similar experience in terms of tolerance and attitudes. Although I was only in New England for a little under a year and I'm from Texas, which may not be part of the deep south.
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Old 03-14-2016, 07:06 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
25,029 posts, read 23,924,861 times
Reputation: 30917
Quote:
Originally Posted by e.p.b. View Post
As a Southerner who has lived in New England for fifteen years, some thoughts:....
where on earth did you go? i grew up in the mid-atlantic...not quite far enough north to be a true yankee, not far enough south to say y'all.
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Old 03-15-2016, 03:08 AM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,099 posts, read 4,737,517 times
Reputation: 5374
Quote:
Originally Posted by e.p.b. View Post
As a Southerner who has lived in New England for fifteen years, some thoughts:

When did "settling for less" become a bad thing? Are southerners being criticized for being less consumeristic, less materialistic? In those comments I find a a bias that blames Southerners for a fundamental value. The South has also, since the Civil War (no blame) been less economically affluent, and generations may have learned to "be happy with less," a value that is now often touted in popular media.

I had no negative biases on moving to New England. In fact, I had bought into the idea they were more liberal, more educated, etc.

What I found: actually more narrow minded and more underlying racism, crass materialism, exploitive business mentality and dishonest business practices, very antiquated and oppressive gender expectations for women, an underlying, seething sense of anger that erupts at any moment in passive aggressive - this in both institutions and organizations. I also found people less well-travelled, less worldly than my hometown in the deep, DEEP South.

I want to be clear, this is what I found in the same socio-economic classes and people of similar educations.

After fifteen years, I decided that generations of economic hardship and the civil rights movement may have transformed the deep south, and the culture and my generation benefited greatly, whereas people in New England weren't forced to advance their culture or their mentality by such experiences. I'd bet that someone from N.E. today is no different from someone of the same age fifty or sixty years ago.

What's interesting is that migration patterns show people leaving N.E. for ... (wait for it) the Deep South of all places. I'm curious as to the cultural changes in N.E. that will take place when this drain of human potential starts to create problems.
That's a shame that the people you encountered gave you that impression.

It really depends on who you have the fortune or misfortune of being around.

When I lived in Louisiana most people I met and interacted with daily in Baton Rouge and Denham Springs were materialistic, judgmental, rude, selfish and would on occasion treat me like garbage for being from the north (especially when I challenged their idea of what a "Yankee" is).

Then I moved to a rural place near Walker. The people I met out in the boonies were the nicest people one could want to meet. Not all of them, but most of them. The sort that would come help you if your car broke down or your roof caved in.

I suspect the same could be true in New England. I've personally known some very nice people from rural Mass and Vermont and one of my closest friends is from Rhode Island.

A lot of the people I grew up around in my home state of NY are decent enough. There are bad seeds as always but that's just life.

The "highly educated" group do tend to be snobbish and up their own colon. Maybe that's the real root of these personalities you've been surrounded by?
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