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Old 03-16-2016, 02:33 PM
 
2,825 posts, read 3,267,707 times
Reputation: 1650

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When it comes to stereotypes, I feel like tons of southerners associate New York/New Jersey with The Godfather or Goodfellas. Being rude is another big one, which isn't the case at all. I went up to Boston with this stereotype in my head and everyone I ran into was very polite.

I associate the North with grittiness. Like the rough and industrial areas of Baltimore or Philly, you don't really encounter that in the South with the exception of Richmond. Many rural towns across the South are very rundown and economically depressed, but many small towns across the North just look super gritty and tough. You also wouldn't find a street like this in the South, this looks extremely northern:

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.0489...2!8i6656?hl=en

Also, there's a difference between "the North" and the Midwest. A state like Iowa isn't Yankee, it's Midwestern. Massachusetts, on the contrary, is Yankee.
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Old 03-16-2016, 03:54 PM
 
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The first two things most of them think is:

1) Cold
2) Rude

After that it's a case by case basis.

It's a bit of a shame. I've lived in Florida and honestly the 2 groups of people causing the most problems are these pieces of **** around the big trashy city areas of the NE and some of the illegals, but they blame all snow birds and northern people for the decline of civilization there.
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Old 03-16-2016, 04:27 PM
 
3,500 posts, read 4,957,688 times
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100 years, or even 75 years ago, many southerners moved to the industrial north for opportunity in factories or business. Many southern professionals attended Princeton Univ. or Columbia Univ. Teachers College (NYC) because southern education was deemed inferior.

But today it's virtually unheard of for any southerner (especially White) to move to the northeast, unless they are assigned a job transfer there. The north-south economic gap has shrunken. Black southerners on the other hand, sometimes are more amenable to moving north (and are ot as afraid of big cities). Many parts (but not all of) the south today have a good, progressive economy, good universities, much lower taxes, much lower COL, and newer housing and infrastructure than the north.
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Old 03-16-2016, 04:34 PM
 
29,908 posts, read 27,355,630 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
Also, there's a difference between "the North" and the Midwest. A state like Iowa isn't Yankee, it's Midwestern. Massachusetts, on the contrary, is Yankee.
The North = the Northeast plus the Midwest. It's a holdover from the era of slavery and stands in distinction from the South, which includes the subregions of the Southeast and South Central. So yes, Iowa would be Yankee.
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Old 03-16-2016, 06:45 PM
 
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North Carolinian here. Generally, I have no problem with anyone from any part of the country....... As long as anyone moving here doesn't go into the, "In ____, we do it THIS way" spill. I would never go somewhere else and act like an know-it-all. Very disrespectful. But I've only experienced this a few times. I have a ton for friends from the North and they're great. My wife's from the Boston area and everyone I've experience there has been great. My wife loves it here in the Charlotte area and the Carolina's in general. Good post!
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Old 03-16-2016, 07:29 PM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,135 posts, read 21,881,518 times
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We don't have to go anywhere in order to meet people from all over. Our water exercise class has had people from Canada to South America. I think there are general traits from each section of the country but all kinds of people from everywhere. When we first moved here our neighbor across the street was from Bangor, Maine. We have one of the most irritating people I have ever met in our water class from Colorado and I have always loved people from Colorado. I am not a morning person and I have to get up too early to go to that class so I can imagine some of those people may say a few words about me.

I have lived in this county for 40 years now so I have many friends and acquaintances.

We are going to RI in a couple of months. In living around people from many places, my biggest fear is driving. Some states have really strange rules and sometimes the police spends time checking out cars from far away like we will be. I think it was in NH that I was last followed for a few miles while the police traveled close behind us. I have also been followed in Mississippi, Arkansas, Texas, and right now I cannot remember anywhere else. It always makes me nervous though. I feel like stopping and saying, "What do you want to know? I will be glad to tell you." That really isn't a very friendly thing to do.

I now get amused when people start bragging about the place they came from. I had a teacher years ago tell us she had been to every state in the union and she said she had never seen a better place to live than Wilkes County, North Carolina. Union County, North Carolina is like a warmer sister to Wilkes. That teacher was right. I would still like to spend about a month in every state and then start on the English speaking countries in Europe.
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Old 03-16-2016, 08:49 PM
 
Location: Prescott Valley, AZ
2,694 posts, read 2,346,176 times
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Coming from Colorado (western state), when I think of the northeast.

1. Elitist
2. Yuppie
3. Aloof
4. Rude
5. Cold

What I think of the south:

1. Friendly
2. Warm
3. Cheaper cost of living
4. Slower lifestyle
5. Down to earth
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Old 03-16-2016, 09:04 PM
 
2,601 posts, read 4,071,101 times
Reputation: 2275
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hschlick84 View Post
Coming from Colorado (western state), when I think of the northeast.

1. Elitist
2. Yuppie
3. Aloof
4. Rude
5. Cold

What I think of the south:

1. Friendly
2. Warm
3. Cheaper cost of living
4. Slower lifestyle
5. Down to earth
Wow. It's really terrible to stereotype a whole region of people that way. Since Colorado is a part of the Great Plains and the Intermountain West, how should we stereotype it?
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Old 03-16-2016, 09:06 PM
 
599 posts, read 309,435 times
Reputation: 604
I am from North Carolina and have travelled throughout the United States though the furthest north I have been is Pennsylvania. I don't really have that much of an interest to travel up north with the exception of maybe New Hampshire and New York. I couldn't live up north due to two things the weather and politics.
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Old 03-16-2016, 09:23 PM
 
900 posts, read 765,387 times
Reputation: 1195
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
When it comes to stereotypes, I feel like tons of southerners associate New York/New Jersey with The Godfather or Goodfellas. Being rude is another big one, which isn't the case at all. I went up to Boston with this stereotype in my head and everyone I ran into was very polite.

I associate the North with grittiness. Like the rough and industrial areas of Baltimore or Philly, you don't really encounter that in the South with the exception of Richmond. Many rural towns across the South are very rundown and economically depressed, but many small towns across the North just look super gritty and tough. You also wouldn't find a street like this in the South, this looks extremely northern:

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.0489...2!8i6656?hl=en

Also, there's a difference between "the North" and the Midwest. A state like Iowa isn't Yankee, it's Midwestern. Massachusetts, on the contrary, is Yankee.
This street could be Byrd Park in Richmond

https://www.google.com/maps/place/22...b7bdcc8d?hl=en

Last edited by spencer114; 03-16-2016 at 09:30 PM.. Reason: Provided link
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