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Old 10-06-2013, 06:33 PM
 
213 posts, read 207,838 times
Reputation: 402

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Southerner here, born,raised & currently still stuck here due to a job. I actually prefer the pace & attitude of Northern cities and enjoy spending time there.I am generally not a fan of small talk. Yes, everyone here will make conversation with you and sometimes I am totally annoyed by this. I do not believe that Northerners or especially New Yorkers are rude, I simply think in large, faced paced cities it is just a matter of efficiency.Can you imagine if every counter person in NYC took time to chit-chat with each customer? I also think that a certain amount of "southern hospitality" is phony.

While I don't like the honking the instant the light turns green, it also makes me furious when "farmer Bob" here in the south is in no hurry & I'm commuting to work.

The south is also slower to embrace change & progress even when it's for the best.

That being said-there are people in ALL regions that cannot be stereotyped. No region is BETTER than the other. It is just a matter of what works for each person. Sometimes I am shocked by my perception of a place vs. the reality. As a previous poster said-if someone mention the Midwest,ALL that came to mind was a cornfield. However, I was shocked to find some really cool cities there.
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Old 10-07-2013, 01:19 AM
 
Location: Bishkek
1,977 posts, read 1,815,881 times
Reputation: 1247
Cold!
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Old 10-07-2013, 04:27 AM
 
774 posts, read 1,695,734 times
Reputation: 681
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
Sounds like someone was offended by the question of what "southerners think about the north". I really can't contemplate how that is offensive, unless you're just looking for trouble.
Great post and rep points given! Nobody should be offended by this question. This question provokes discussion, which can lead to a breaking down of stereotypes of both regions that some people have.
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Old 10-07-2013, 05:48 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,672 posts, read 33,671,635 times
Reputation: 51862
Quote:
Originally Posted by SubieB4 View Post
Another thing is it's funny and I've been here in CT now for 16 years and this STILL bothers me.. say you and another person are walking on a sidewalk, the person walking towards you will look down at the ground as they pass or they will just stare straight ahead.. very few people will smile or say anything, OR I hold a door open some may say something or nothing at all.

Anyways that's enough for now as I can go on and on about this.
I am having physical problems with my left hip, left leg and foot for the past year. I look down now when I walk because I'm afraid of falling or tripping. It has occurred to me that people might think I'm avoiding eye contact.
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Old 10-07-2013, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,682 posts, read 36,118,702 times
Reputation: 63235
As a southerner who has lived and traveled to many places all over the world, including "the north," I can only speak for myself. I like visiting the northern states - I love history so I always enjoy visiting historical sites and experiencing a change of pace, and I also enjoy finding the similarities between regions and people as well.

The further north I go, the faster the pace of life in general seems. Not necessarily a bad thing but I personally prefer a more laid back vibe. Anyway, in my experience, people in smaller towns seem just as friendly overall as people in small towns in the south, but in the larger cities, it's a whole different ballgame - people do seem more rude and brusque or just less friendly than in Southern cities in general. I have no idea why but I really don't care either because I generally avoid huge cities anyway - I just don't care for all the traffic and urban sprawl in ANY region of the country.

Generally speaking, I think the northern states have lots to offer in the way of beauty, scenery, charm, and history, and I've never had a problem with anyone being rude outside of large cities. I always enjoy my visits north, except for in the winter time. I much prefer southern winters and have lived in the south for so long that the southern summers don't faze me one bit either.

My husband is currently working up in PA and I'm looking forward to visiting up there several times over the next year. I can't wait!

When northerners hear my southern accent, sometimes they make comments, but they're usually just conversational comments, like "Where are you from?" and then they proceed to tell me about their trip to Texas or ask me questions about Texas - never rude, though sometimes they are misinformed (for instance, it usually surprises people to hear that Texas isn't all desert and tumbleweeds and that in northeast Texas we actually have lots of fall foliage and green, rolling hills, and that we get snow several times a year).

I always enjoy the opportunity to dispel stereotypes from both their minds and mine.
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Old 10-07-2013, 09:50 AM
 
56,533 posts, read 80,824,285 times
Reputation: 12482
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
As a southerner who has lived and traveled to many places all over the world, including "the north," I can only speak for myself. I like visiting the northern states - I love history so I always enjoy visiting historical sites and experiencing a change of pace, and I also enjoy finding the similarities between regions and people as well.

The further north I go, the faster the pace of life in general seems. Not necessarily a bad thing but I personally prefer a more laid back vibe. Anyway, in my experience, people in smaller towns seem just as friendly overall as people in small towns in the south, but in the larger cities, it's a whole different ballgame - people do seem more rude and brusque or just less friendly than in Southern cities in general. I have no idea why but I really don't care either because I generally avoid huge cities anyway - I just don't care for all the traffic and urban sprawl in ANY region of the country.

Generally speaking, I think the northern states have lots to offer in the way of beauty, scenery, charm, and history, and I've never had a problem with anyone being rude outside of large cities. I always enjoy my visits north, except for in the winter time. I much prefer southern winters and have lived in the south for so long that the southern summers don't faze me one bit either.

My husband is currently working up in PA and I'm looking forward to visiting up there several times over the next year. I can't wait!

When northerners hear my southern accent, sometimes they make comments, but they're usually just conversational comments, like "Where are you from?" and then they proceed to tell me about their trip to Texas or ask me questions about Texas - never rude, though sometimes they are misinformed (for instance, it usually surprises people to hear that Texas isn't all desert and tumbleweeds and that in northeast Texas we actually have lots of fall foliage and green, rolling hills, and that we get snow several times a year).

I always enjoy the opportunity to dispel stereotypes from both their minds and mine.
It depends on how large the city is up here too. It may also be a matter of how long you know someone or timing too.
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Old 10-07-2013, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,332 posts, read 10,298,159 times
Reputation: 5394
Quote:
Originally Posted by Al G View Post
Cold!

True for sure it is a lot colder up here. As I posted in the other thread though, your beaches in SC around Charleston leave a lot to be desired with all the brown murky water on the beaches.
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Old 10-07-2013, 04:46 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,511 posts, read 9,047,067 times
Reputation: 5008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wanderlove View Post
Southerner here, born,raised & currently still stuck here due to a job. I actually prefer the pace & attitude of Northern cities and enjoy spending time there.I am generally not a fan of small talk. Yes, everyone here will make conversation with you and sometimes I am totally annoyed by this. I do not believe that Northerners or especially New Yorkers are rude, I simply think in large, faced paced cities it is just a matter of efficiency.Can you imagine if every counter person in NYC took time to chit-chat with each customer? I also think that a certain amount of "southern hospitality" is phony.

While I don't like the honking the instant the light turns green, it also makes me furious when "farmer Bob" here in the south is in no hurry & I'm commuting to work.

The south is also slower to embrace change & progress even when it's for the best.

That being said-there are people in ALL regions that cannot be stereotyped. No region is BETTER than the other. It is just a matter of what works for each person. Sometimes I am shocked by my perception of a place vs. the reality. As a previous poster said-if someone mention the Midwest,ALL that came to mind was a cornfield. However, I was shocked to find some really cool cities there.
This is almost exactly as I have viewed it also. The slow doings and constant need for small talk with complete strangers is fine and dandy in small towns where there isn't much hustle and bustle, but in larger cities, which the north has a lot more of, this kind of slows down the gears of things.

What area of the south are you from if you don't mind me asking?
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Old 10-07-2013, 04:49 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,511 posts, read 9,047,067 times
Reputation: 5008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kemba View Post
Great post and rep points given! Nobody should be offended by this question. This question provokes discussion, which can lead to a breaking down of stereotypes of both regions that some people have.
Thank you! I enjoy reading people's opinions and personal accounts on this matter, they can be constructive to doing away with long held stereotypes.
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Old 10-07-2013, 04:56 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,084 posts, read 34,148,649 times
Reputation: 16839
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
As a southerner who has lived and traveled to many places all over the world, including "the north," I can only speak for myself. I like visiting the northern states - I love history so I always enjoy visiting historical sites and experiencing a change of pace, and I also enjoy finding the similarities between regions and people as well.

The further north I go, the faster the pace of life in general seems. Not necessarily a bad thing but I personally prefer a more laid back vibe. Anyway, in my experience, people in smaller towns seem just as friendly overall as people in small towns in the south, but in the larger cities, it's a whole different ballgame - people do seem more rude and brusque or just less friendly than in Southern cities in general. I have no idea why but I really don't care either because I generally avoid huge cities anyway - I just don't care for all the traffic and urban sprawl in ANY region of the country.

Generally speaking, I think the northern states have lots to offer in the way of beauty, scenery, charm, and history, and I've never had a problem with anyone being rude outside of large cities. I always enjoy my visits north, except for in the winter time. I much prefer southern winters and have lived in the south for so long that the southern summers don't faze me one bit either.

My husband is currently working up in PA and I'm looking forward to visiting up there several times over the next year. I can't wait!

When northerners hear my southern accent, sometimes they make comments, but they're usually just conversational comments, like "Where are you from?" and then they proceed to tell me about their trip to Texas or ask me questions about Texas - never rude, though sometimes they are misinformed (for instance, it usually surprises people to hear that Texas isn't all desert and tumbleweeds and that in northeast Texas we actually have lots of fall foliage and green, rolling hills, and that we get snow several times a year).

I always enjoy the opportunity to dispel stereotypes from both their minds and mine.
Keep going further Northeast and the hustle and bustle starts to slow back down and then the further you go, the slower the pace. Northern Maine is WAY slower paced than even Southern Maine and a World of difference than Boston. It is hard to imagine it is the same Country as NYC. Fire up the Ol' Passport and make a trip up into New Brunswick and Quebec to see a real difference a couple miles across the border makes (while in New Brunswick you have to find a "Greco Pizza" and get a Doniar... one of the things I truly miss from that area.)
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