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Old 10-08-2013, 02:48 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
I think that's the difference in small town New England vs small towns in the deep south. In the south, unfortunately, most votes are along racial lines in small towns. The blacks will vote democrat, the whites will vote republican. In New England, where there are very few blacks to begin with, the small town people will often be more liberal and inclined to go 3rd party or democratic.

One thing that is constant in every region though is that big cities are usually democratic strongholds, even in the south. Houston, Dallas, San Antonio, Atlanta, New Orelans, etc.

The diff is the suburbs in the South are much more conservative and Republican than the Philly suburbs or any suburbs in the North. Politically we are two different countries.
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Old 10-08-2013, 03:41 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
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My brother lives in Ohio, in a rural area. This is pretty far north - as far north as Pennsylvania, anyway. The rural areas of Ohio seem very similar to the rural areas of the south, from interests and activities, to politics.
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Old 10-08-2013, 03:47 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,985 posts, read 41,937,844 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
My brother lives in Ohio, in a rural area. This is pretty far north - as far north as Pennsylvania, anyway. The rural areas of Ohio seem very similar to the rural areas of the south, from interests and activities, to politics.
Outside the heavily black areas of the south, the rural south looks are deeper red than much of the rural north, but of course there's variation in both.

http://www.outsidethebeltway.com/wp-...y-standard.jpg

Edit: first link doesn't work, use second.

http://freedomslighthouse.net/2012-p...oral-vote-map/

by white vote, the difference is far starker. There's no overlap between the north and south, excluding Florida and maybe Virginia, which has a lot of northern transplants:

http://blog.nola.com/news_impact/200...nov09-2008.gif

By, the way the difference in Democratic vote in upstate vs downstate NY nearly disappears if you just look at the white vote — at this point, the difference is mainly due to different demographics.

Last edited by nei; 10-08-2013 at 04:22 PM..
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Old 10-08-2013, 04:10 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Outside the heavily black areas of the south, the rural south looks are deeper red than much of the rural north, but of course there's variation in both.

http://www.outsidethebeltway.com/wp-...y-standard.jpg

by white vote, the difference is far starker. There's no overlap between the north and south, excluding Florida and maybe Virginia, which has a lot of northern transplants:

http://blog.nola.com/news_impact/200...nov09-2008.gif

By, the way the difference in Democratic vote in upstate vs downstate NY nearly disappears if you just look at the white vote — at this point, the difference is mainly due to different demographics.

I was talking specifically about Ohio. Here's the red vs blue counties in 2012:

http://toledobladedata.com/electionr..._breakdown.jpg

By golly, look here at Pennsylvania!

http://www.democratic-republicans.us...on-results.jpg

But here's the whole US. You can easily see that the rural areas of the South and the rural areas of much of the North vote pretty much the same.

http://cdn.theatlanticcities.com/img...p2012.main.jpg

Honestly, I thought this was pretty common knowledge.
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Old 10-08-2013, 04:20 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I was talking specifically about Ohio. Here's the red vs blue counties in 2012:

http://toledobladedata.com/electionr..._breakdown.jpg

By golly, look here at Pennsylvania!

http://www.democratic-republicans.us...on-results.jpg

But here's the whole US. You can easily see that the rural areas of the South and the rural areas of much of the North vote pretty much the same.

http://cdn.theatlanticcities.com/img...p2012.main.jpg

Honestly, I thought this was pretty common knowledge.
Did you look at my maps?

Except those maps doesn't distinguish between counties that went Republican by 51% or 71%, and for parts of the south, the black population makes the democratic vote % different than it'd be otherwise. The difference is more obvious if you compare rural northern whites with rural southern whites.

Not only is it not common knowledge (I think), it's wrong.
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Old 10-08-2013, 09:57 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,333 posts, read 10,300,727 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I was talking specifically about Ohio. Here's the red vs blue counties in 2012:

http://toledobladedata.com/electionr..._breakdown.jpg

By golly, look here at Pennsylvania!

http://www.democratic-republicans.us...on-results.jpg

But here's the whole US. You can easily see that the rural areas of the South and the rural areas of much of the North vote pretty much the same.

http://cdn.theatlanticcities.com/img...p2012.main.jpg

Honestly, I thought this was pretty common knowledge.

You know nothing about my state, so quit while you are ahead. Unlike Texas, if we had a Ted Cruz he would be voted out. In fact, we did, his name was Santorum, and as an incumbent Senator he lost by one of the largest margins ever in PA. See the difference. Texas and the rest of the South is much, much redder than PA or other states up north. Obama won 44.3 of the white vote in PA in 2012. In GA he won 14.5%, SC 19.7%, AL 13.3% etc. etc. White support for Obama was much lower in the South (hence more Republican) than the White vote in the North (whites less Republican).
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Old 10-08-2013, 11:20 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,816 posts, read 12,321,925 times
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I really don't get why the South has a more "working class" image. Here's how I see it. Rural areas in general are working class, and in both the north and south the majority of folks actually live in cities and suburbs. Most of the Southern cities have a white collar reputation like Atlanta, Charlotte, Raleigh, Charleston, Savannah, Nashville, and Houston and Dallas if you consider Texas to be in the South completely. However many Northern cities have a blue collar reputation particularly Pittsburgh, Detroit, Cleveland, Newark and most of upstate New York. So wouldn't this make the South more educated and white collar in comparison??? I think the only truly sophisticated, white collar cities in the north are New York, Washington DC, Chicago, and Boston. In particular Southern cities are very graceful and classy while many northern cities are filled with crime and drugs, and many have very depressing architecture and landscapes and no charm. There is no place in the South as depressing as the Michigan Rust Belt for example.

The South has lower incomes but also a lower cost of living so the quality of life is actually quite comfortable. I live in West Virginia now which on paper is one of the poorest states but I do not see the level of abject poverty I've seen in Philadelphia. Southerners do see Northerners as liberal, and many areas in the South like Northern Virginia, parts of NC, and South Florida are seeing northerners change the culture. I find people from New York and New Jersey to be the rudest I have met anywhere in the nation. The only rural areas in the north I have been to is western Pennsylvania and people there were pretty nice and friendly.
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Old 10-09-2013, 08:29 AM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
9,522 posts, read 9,405,124 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
The diff is the suburbs in the South are much more conservative and Republican than the Philly suburbs or any suburbs in the North. Politically we are two different countries.
Maybe more than two. "The North" isn't monolithic.
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Old 10-09-2013, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,695 posts, read 36,132,256 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
You know nothing about my state, so quit while you are ahead. Unlike Texas, if we had a Ted Cruz he would be voted out. In fact, we did, his name was Santorum, and as an incumbent Senator he lost by one of the largest margins ever in PA. See the difference. Texas and the rest of the South is much, much redder than PA or other states up north. Obama won 44.3 of the white vote in PA in 2012. In GA he won 14.5%, SC 19.7%, AL 13.3% etc. etc. White support for Obama was much lower in the South (hence more Republican) than the White vote in the North (whites less Republican).
I know more than you think about "your" state. For starters, my husband works up there, in the Pittsburg area, and is in fact up there right now (I will be visiting him in a few weeks, so you may want to take cover! LOL!). I also lived in Maryland and in Ohio and have been to Pennsylvania often since I lived so close by. I think it's a lovely state overall, with lots of beautiful scenery, plenty of history, and SOME friendly people - especially in the rural areas.

People in the rural areas and smaller towns seem very similar to people in rural areas and smaller towns in the South. Where I experience the most pronounced differences are in the larger cities.
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Old 10-09-2013, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Brew City
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Mississippi is NOT the leader in timber exports. I'm not sure where you got that idea. They're not even close.
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