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Old 10-10-2013, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,333 posts, read 10,303,665 times
Reputation: 5400

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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
By the way, Tom, I suspect that the reason you have so much trouble (to hear you talk) with Southerners probably has a lot to do with your (if we're LUCKY) thinly veiled disdain and prejudice toward the people and the region itself. You may think you're good at disguising it...but Archie Bunker thinks he's socially appropriate too.

Deep seated prejudices are often very hard to hide. I've lived in the South most of my life and I can't recall EVER bringing up the topic of the Civil War with someone from the North. I don't know where you're getting this idea that Southerners in general are obsessed with the topic of the Civil War -my gosh, talk about ancient history. I literally can't recall the last time I even had a real life conversation with anyone about the Civil War, though I did recently have a conversation with someone about the battle of Goliad in Texas.

That being said, it's probably discussed as much as, say, the Tudor miniseries, or the Revolutionary War, or Hurricane Katrina...but not as much as Roll Tide football or Drew Brees - not by a long shot! In other words, if the topic is history or ancestry or something pertinent, the topic may come up, but in general conversation...nyahhhhh...sorry, I'm just not buying it.

Now if YOU'RE bringing it up, via your own attitude or veiled remarks, or whatever...well, that's a whole other story, and in fact it's the scenario I suspect is going down.

So....to stay on topic (which is "What do Southerners think of the Northern United States?" - not "What does Tom77falcons think of Southerners?"), I'd say that most southerners I know feel patriotic toward the ENTIRE United States. Many have traveled extensively, including to the northern US and Canada, and especially enjoy traveling to New England for the fall colors, or to Amish country in PA. Do they want to LIVE there? Apparently not...typically due to weather, distance from family and community, and economic reasons (we typically really enjoy a lower cost of living "down here!"). But that doesn't mean there's animosity - certainly not the sort that YOU display consistently. Wow, pot - meet kettle.

I'm glad to know you do feel that way. I've noticed many times that you are very supportive of the US.
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Old 10-10-2013, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,713 posts, read 36,145,910 times
Reputation: 63310
Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
I'm glad to know you do feel that way. I've noticed many times that you are very supportive of the US.
Yes, I am - just as I am also supportive of the southern states and culture, and Texas, as well. Lots of misconceptions and prejudices abound about all of the above, and I enjoy dispelling them. I also enjoy learning about and visiting other regions and states and learning new things about them. I go with an open mind, and meet new people with an open mind, expecting the best from them, and usually having a marvelous time. And nearly every time I visit a new place, or meet someone from another region, I am pleasantly surprised, and am even more proud and grateful to be an American citizen.

And the more I travel, the more I appreciate the whole nation, and especially the region where I live. "There's no place like home."
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Old 10-10-2013, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,333 posts, read 10,303,665 times
Reputation: 5400
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Yes, I am - just as I am also supportive of the southern states and culture, and Texas, as well. Lots of misconceptions and prejudices abound about all of the above, and I enjoy dispelling them. I also enjoy learning about and visiting other regions and states and learning new things about them. I go with an open mind, and meet new people with an open mind, expecting the best from them, and usually having a marvelous time. And nearly every time I visit a new place, or meet someone from another region, I am pleasantly surprised, and am even more proud and grateful to be an American citizen.

And the more I travel, the more I appreciate the whole nation, and especially the region where I live. "There's no place like home."

You are lucky to be able to travel as much as you do. I love travel also, and am very glad to get back to the US and my home state as well. Especially when I went to Afghanistan courtesy of the US Govt. .
PA and my whole region, while trashed by many Americans, is beautiful to me. And that is all that matters.

btw, I find places down South to be very beautiful as well. I love those islands off the coast of MS. I also think Charleston and Savannah are amazing in beauty.
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Old 10-10-2013, 07:20 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,713 posts, read 36,145,910 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
You are lucky to be able to travel as much as you do. I love travel also, and am very glad to get back to the US and my home state as well. Especially when I went to Afghanistan courtesy of the US Govt. .
PA and my whole region, while trashed by many Americans, is beautiful to me. And that is all that matters.

btw, I find places down South to be very beautiful as well. I love those islands off the coast of MS. I also think Charleston and Savannah are amazing in beauty.
And I like Pennsylvania! So there we have it. And I appreciate your kind words about the Southern US. By the way, thanks for your service. My kids have traveled compliments of Uncle Sam as well, to some very weird places (so has my dad) where people tend to try to kill you. Like the old saying goes, "Join the military, travel the world, meet interesting people...and kill them." (Or be killed - that part gets left off a lot!) Anyway, you're right, it's a blessing to be able to travel...sometimes. Of course, when my husband was traveling back and forth to West Africa on business, he wouldn't have agreed with that statement!
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Old 10-10-2013, 10:45 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,333 posts, read 10,303,665 times
Reputation: 5400
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
And I like Pennsylvania! So there we have it. And I appreciate your kind words about the Southern US. By the way, thanks for your service. My kids have traveled compliments of Uncle Sam as well, to some very weird places (so has my dad) where people tend to try to kill you. Like the old saying goes, "Join the military, travel the world, meet interesting people...and kill them." (Or be killed - that part gets left off a lot!) Anyway, you're right, it's a blessing to be able to travel...sometimes. Of course, when my husband was traveling back and forth to West Africa on business, he wouldn't have agreed with that statement!

btw, I went to Afghanistan as a civilian. I appreciate your thoughts, but I don't want to take credit for being in the military in combat. Those guys deserve all the credit. They protect us civilians when we are there, and they do an amazing job at it. Our military, and the people in it, are incredible. I saw that first hand when I was over there. We are very lucky as a country to have the military we do.
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Old 10-11-2013, 12:39 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,713 posts, read 36,145,910 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
btw, I went to Afghanistan as a civilian. I appreciate your thoughts, but I don't want to take credit for being in the military in combat. Those guys deserve all the credit. They protect us civilians when we are there, and they do an amazing job at it. Our military, and the people in it, are incredible. I saw that first hand when I was over there. We are very lucky as a country to have the military we do.
Well, thanks for clearing that up, but still - that's a tough assignment no matter whether you're a civilian or military. When my husband was working in Nigeria during all those kidnappings, I was a nervous wreck.

Makes me even more happy I live in the US, when I see or hear about some of the awful plights of so many people in this world. Most people just want to live and provide for their families and it's horrible what is happening in some countries.
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Old 10-17-2013, 01:14 PM
 
500 posts, read 680,116 times
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Iím from Texas and have traveled through the entire northeast and Midwest except the Dakotas and Nebraska. I have nothing negative to say about people from up north. My favorite scenery is the Berkshires in Massachusetts and the Poconos in Pennsylvania even the endless rows of cornfield in Illinois have a certain simplicity about them. I spent the most time in Illinois and some in upstate New York. Of the relatives in both states I have met some of their friends, coworkers and neighbors. Some of these people were friendly, funny or quite. I think a personís personality is shaped more by their family dynamics past and present as opposed being from the north or south. I can see there would big a difference in lifestyles between the big city dwellers and the county folks.
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Old 01-06-2014, 10:33 PM
 
2 posts, read 2,294 times
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I live in the upper south, Kentucky. I have been to NY once but not the city, way up in the mountains for a camp and I have been to Chicago for a class trip when I was younger. Those are the only two times I have been up north and my experiences in Chicago were not the best.
Before I had traveled to Chicago many people told me they are not as nice as we are down here. I also found it funny that northerners think its weird to have conversations with people you don't know. I didn't want to stereotype but I found what people had told me were true. I was made fun of twice because of my accent. Also the tour guide in Chicago talked down to us, like we were not smart enough to understand a big city like Chicago. Also the pace in the Chicago was much faster than here in Kentucky. And I agree with the user above about Atlanta. It might be south in terms of geographical location but it reminds me more of a urban area or city (sorry about any fragments or misspelling I don't have time to check)
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Old 01-06-2014, 10:50 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,513 posts, read 9,052,094 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anon123456 View Post
I live in the upper south, Kentucky. I have been to NY once but not the city, way up in the mountains for a camp and I have been to Chicago for a class trip when I was younger. Those are the only two times I have been up north and my experiences in Chicago were not the best.
Before I had traveled to Chicago many people told me they are not as nice as we are down here. I also found it funny that northerners think its weird to have conversations with people you don't know. I didn't want to stereotype but I found what people had told me were true. I was made fun of twice because of my accent. Also the tour guide in Chicago talked down to us, like we were not smart enough to understand a big city like Chicago. Also the pace in the Chicago was much faster than here in Kentucky. And I agree with the user above about Atlanta. It might be south in terms of geographical location but it reminds me more of a urban area or city (sorry about any fragments or misspelling I don't have time to check)
Really big cities aren't exactly known for their hospitality in the sense that you might receive from a small town situated in the south. The pace of life in a large city like Chicago HAS to be faster, there are more people that you have to pass through, the city is always teeming with activity, there's always a hustle and bustle of traffic.

I'm a little surprised that a tour guide would make fun of you. Perhaps you were just unaccustomed to the tone, or that was the tone he used in general. As a tour guide in a city like Chicago they probably find people from even more remote and distance locations than Kentucky, so it's not like you were anything rare to them, unless for some reason you are from an extremely country part of Kentucky and your accent is particularly thick.

In larger cities it isn't overly convenient to have and carry out conversations with complete strangers, there are always places to be and schedules are tight and don't allow for a lot of lingering, this is probably why most northerners aren't big on conversing with random people. I think you'll find the same is true in almost any large city. I'm sure Atlanta, Dallas, and other large southern cities will be quite similar.

I'm sorry you didn't have the best experience in Chicago, but there must have been some things about your visit that went well. Plenty of sights, cultures, and other interesting events and places there that you won't find just anywhere.
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Old 01-07-2014, 12:06 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,713 posts, read 36,145,910 times
Reputation: 63310
Most big cities have a faster pace and people tend to be in a bigger hurry and therefore may not seem as "friendly." That being said, there sure are some friendly Southern cities that are also big - Dallas, Atlanta, Austin, and New Orleans spring to mind immediately.

The only large city outside the south that I've visited that really felt outright unfriendly to me was, surprisingly, the city of brotherly love - Philly. I've been several times and left several times with the same impression. Other large cities outside the south that I've visited did not leave me with that same impression at all. Of course, I am sure there are some pleasant people in Philadelphia - unfortunately I haven't been blessed to run across them in my travels. Pity really, because that city has a lot of very interesting sights and history to it.

Big cities that I recall as particularly pleasant (outside the south) with pleasant people as well include Baltimore, DC, Minneapolis (especially so in fact!), Portland (OR), San Francisco, Las Vegas, and Salt Lake City (which also struck me as some sort of parallel universe!).
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