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Old 10-01-2013, 04:54 PM
 
149 posts, read 377,452 times
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That would be "diverse area" in the title.

I've been considering relocation for a while. I have been discussing suggestions. I have noticed that people only suggest cities and neighborhoods that are very diverse. A few times I have mentioned certain places, I have been told "oh, I don't think you would like it there, it isn't a lot of diversity.

Diversity is something I could take or leave. Now, I don't avoid diversity, but a lack of diversity isn't a dealbreaker. What is a dealbreaker is racial intolerance. But not every homogeneous neighborhood is racially intolerant.

Any minorities or LGBT people who doesn't find living in a diverse are a high priority?
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Old 10-01-2013, 06:15 PM
 
56,705 posts, read 81,017,273 times
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I think that even the word "diverse" is loaded term and can vary in terms of degree.
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Old 10-01-2013, 07:57 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
2,176 posts, read 973,964 times
Reputation: 1295
Quote:
Originally Posted by redbacchus View Post
That would be "diverse area" in the title.

I've been considering relocation for a while. I have been discussing suggestions. I have noticed that people only suggest cities and neighborhoods that are very diverse. A few times I have mentioned certain places, I have been told "oh, I don't think you would like it there, it isn't a lot of diversity.

Diversity is something I could take or leave. Now, I don't avoid diversity, but a lack of diversity isn't a dealbreaker. What is a dealbreaker is racial intolerance. But not every homogeneous neighborhood is racially intolerant.

Any minorities or LGBT people who doesn't find living in a diverse are a high priority?
im not a minority but the whole diversity thing is getting annoying. just go live wherever you wanna live and are comfortable there.
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Old 10-01-2013, 08:10 PM
 
29,947 posts, read 27,424,696 times
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I think people sometimes use "diversity" as a codeword for having a critical mass of one's particular minority group present. So someone might describe a town that's 70% White, 25% Black, and 5% "other" as diverse to a Black person who wants to live somewhere where a sizable (relative to the overall size of the town) share of the population is also Black.
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Old 10-01-2013, 08:21 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,811 posts, read 4,446,854 times
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I'm hispanic, I don't really care a about diversity. Aslong as no one bothers you and you live in a safe community , then race shouldn't matter. The only good thing about diversity is that it usually means you will have a wide variety of restaurants to eat at.
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Old 10-01-2013, 08:24 PM
 
542 posts, read 1,407,656 times
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As a Gay American, I choose to live in San Francisco because I want to be around people who are like me. People are not very accepting of homosexuals in other parts of the country
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Old 10-01-2013, 08:45 PM
 
29,947 posts, read 27,424,696 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
I'm hispanic, I don't really care a about diversity. Aslong as no one bothers you and you live in a safe community , then race shouldn't matter. The only good thing about diversity is that it usually means you will have a wide variety of restaurants to eat at.
It's usually not really about race per se, but more about culture.
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Old 10-02-2013, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,423 posts, read 16,981,227 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason_show View Post
As a Gay American, I choose to live in San Francisco because I want to be around people who are like me. People are not very accepting of homosexuals in other parts of the country
Complete and total fallacy!

As a Gay American, I find the gay people who live in San Francisco arrogant and shallow. I also find things like Folsom Street Fair highly offensive and destructive to the gay movement.

I live in Savannah, GA ... one of the most beautiful cities in the world, and one of the most tolerant, openly-gay and accepting cities in the nation! We have gay bars, gay civic organizations, openly gay politicians, gay pride, gay beach weekend, and about an hour outside of town, surrounded by onion farms, a GAY NUDIST RESORT!

You're missing out on a lot by limiting yourself to a "gay ghetto" like SFO! I have been to the Castro many times, and it's not even the "gayest" neighborhood in America!

TO THE OP! Live where you want to live! This country is far more tolerant and accepting than this ^^^^ guy would want us to believe!

Last edited by Newsboy; 10-02-2013 at 11:38 AM..
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Old 10-02-2013, 12:03 PM
 
Location: NJ
12,284 posts, read 31,783,270 times
Reputation: 5225
I am friends with a lesbian couple who live in OK (Norman, so probably the best area in the state for gays) and they find it difficult, mainly because they have children and it can be a bit hard with some attitudes they encounter.
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Old 10-02-2013, 01:58 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,819,735 times
Reputation: 11141
I would think that, for gay couples, the perception of acceptance may be less important than the actual rights afforded to them. This is probably more important to some than to others based on income level, individual access to health care, the need for survivorship benefits/inheritance, the raising of children, etc. While these issues are important to everyone, they can be especially important to those with more modest and/or limited means.

Some other things to consider would be the age and educational attainment demographics of one city vs. another given that acceptance for gay people is more highly correlated to the younger generations and the more highly educated. These may predict a better outcome than any specific diversity metric alone.
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