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Old 10-08-2013, 10:03 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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The "rowhouse belt" in the U.S. basically runs from the Albany region down to northern Virginia (Old Town Alexandria). It's by far most well represented in Pennsylvania, where virtually every small city and borough in the eastern part of the state (south of the Scranton area, and east of Harrisburg) which has 19th century or earlier structures has rowhouses. Really, you can find rowhouses in municipalities with a few thousand people.

Heading west, there are three notable rowhouse cities: Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, and Saint Louis. Indianapolis and Columbus were rowhouse cities at one point, but urban renewal just about has erased all record of this (particularly for Indianapolis). Then there's nothing until you hit San Francisco on the west coast.

Boston is the only place in New England where you find significant numbers of rowhouses. The urban vernacular switched to detached wooden houses (like farmhouses which happened to be in the city) pretty early on. I know of one surviving stand in New Haven, but that's about it. Rowhouses are also rare in the upper Midwest, but Chicago has a few (although brick houses which look like rowhouses but have a few feet of space between them are far more common)

The older southern cities (Charleston, Savannah, and New Orleans) have rowhouses in their oldest segments. Richmond also has one or two surviving rowhouse neighborhoods.
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Old 10-08-2013, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
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I definitely wouldn't qualify Savannah as a row-house city. It similar to Charleston, SC in that most of their row-houses are located in it's historic district while the majority of their housing stock in the city are not row-houses.
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Old 10-08-2013, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
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My list of row-house cities by region

Northeast/Mid-Atlantic
Boston
Baltimore
Pittsburgh
New York City
Washington DC
Philadelphia

South
Richmond (though I'm on the fence about this choice)

Midwest
St. Louis
Cleveland
Cincinnati

West
San Francisco
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Old 10-08-2013, 11:33 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,416 posts, read 11,920,328 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gwillyfromphilly View Post
My list of row-house cities by region

Midwest
St. Louis
Cleveland
Cincinnati
What neighborhoods in Cleveland have rowhouses?

Everywhere I've been in Cleveland with older housing (Ohio City, Tremont, etc) has detached, mainly wood-frame structures.
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Old 10-08-2013, 01:47 PM
 
891 posts, read 1,079,867 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gwillyfromphilly View Post
My list of row-house cities by region

Northeast/Mid-Atlantic
Boston
Baltimore
Pittsburgh
New York City
Washington DC
Philadelphia

South
Richmond (though I'm on the fence about this choice)

Midwest
St. Louis
Cleveland
Cincinnati

West
San Francisco
Cleveland is not a rowhouse city by any stretch.
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Old 10-08-2013, 01:57 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, OH
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Cleveland has a couple areas that could fool:

http://www.clevelandrealestatenews.c...ospect-row.jpg

Cleveland Ohio row houses | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

But Cleveland is definitely not a row home city. The architecture resembles more Chicago-Detroit, Great Lakes region.

--

Ironically, a majority of the new Townhome construction within the city limits are modern version of quasi - row homes:

http://l.b5z.net/i/u/10157169/i/Circ...s_for_Sale.JPG

http://planning.city.cleveland.oh.us...Coltman_03.jpg
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Old 10-08-2013, 02:06 PM
 
781 posts, read 1,094,315 times
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Idk if Richmond VA is considered a row house city to most but its has more than 1 or 2 row neighborhoods as eschaton posted earlier, Jackson Ward, Church Hill, The Fan, Monument Ave. and Carver to name a few.
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Old 10-08-2013, 03:34 PM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by STLgasm View Post
Cleveland is not a rowhouse city by any stretch.
I forgot to add that Cleveland was an "on the fence" type of choice for me but unlike what other posters are saying, Cleveland does indeed have row-houses.
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Old 10-08-2013, 03:42 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post

Heading west, there are three notable rowhouse cities: Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, and Saint Louis. Indianapolis and Columbus were rowhouse cities at one point, but urban renewal just about has erased all record of this (particularly for Indianapolis). Then there's nothing until you hit San Francisco on the west coast.
From what I can tell, St. Louis has only a handful of rowhouses, most of the older house stock is brick house close together.

Quote:
Boston is the only place in New England where you find significant numbers of rowhouses. The urban vernacular switched to detached wooden houses (like farmhouses which happened to be in the city) pretty early on. I know of one surviving stand in New Haven, but that's about it. Rowhouses are also rare in the upper Midwest, but Chicago has a few (although brick houses which look like rowhouses but have a few feet of space between them are far more common)
There are a number of small New England cities that have a block or two: Springfield, Holyoke in Western MA, for example.

Rowhouse City Classification List
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Old 10-08-2013, 03:43 PM
 
Location: New Orleans
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Would cities like St. Louis or Cincinnati be considered row house cities? I mean they only seem to have a few neighborhoods that have actual row houses (as in the buildings are connected), though they do have many other neighborhoods that have buildings that are similar to row houses but there are a few feet between them. I guess it would depend on how strict people's definition of row houses are.
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