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Old 10-09-2013, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Hmm. I'm surprised, my image of Pittsburgh is rowhouses (as well as detached houses close together). Perhaps, the rowhouse neighborhoods get more attention. New York City probably has more rowhouses than Pittsburgh, but but because of the reason I mentioned earlier (households living on top of each other), they don't get counted.
Pittsburgh's housing stock varies dramatically depending upon the portion of the city and the age.



This map can be misleading in places. For example, neighborhoods which had a lot of urban renewal near the core come out as younger, but in some cases have a lot of intact housing left. But you can see generally speaking most of the outer portions of the city were built up a bit after rowhouses became unfashionable. A lot of the remaining older portion was either higher-class (and tended towards detached brick victorians) or in hilly areas where rows were not feasible.

Locally, the portions of Pittsburgh which get the most press are most of the East End (which tends to be a mix of rowhouses and 19th/early 20th century grand construction) and the rowhouse areas elsewhere in the city. The "interwar" or suburban neighborhoods in the outer North Side and South of the Mon (and particularly the West End) are unfasionable, and lack real business districts, so no one not from the area goes there.
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Old 10-09-2013, 12:03 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Hmm. I'm surprised, my image of Pittsburgh is rowhouses (as well as detached houses close together). Perhaps, the rowhouse neighborhoods get more attention. New York City probably has more rowhouses than Pittsburgh, but but because of the reason I mentioned earlier (households living on top of each other), they don't get counted. San Francisco has tiny gaps between a lot of houses, but they appear like rowhouses from first glance, more so than St. Louis. And since San Francisco uses less set back than St. Louis, it gives more of a streetwall appearance. Not rowhouses in San Francisco:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=San+F...351.55,,0,1.91

Not rowhouses in St. Louis:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Soula...278.08,,0,1.03

Not rowhouses in New York City [I think]:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Green...255.09,,0,10.8
Just FYI, the street you posted for STL is not in Soulard, which has a lot more rowhouses. It's in fact Fox Park, which is characterized more by 2 and 4-family flats. You typed Soulard into the search, but Armand Place is not Soulard.
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Old 10-09-2013, 12:06 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,984 posts, read 41,929,314 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by STLgasm View Post
Just FYI, the street you posted for STL is not in Soulard, which has a lot more rowhouses. It's in fact Fox Park, which is characterized more by 2 and 4-family flats. You typed Soulard into the search, but Armand Place is not Soulard.
gotcha, I was looking on purpose for example of "almost rowhouses".
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Old 10-09-2013, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
gotcha, I was looking on purpose for example of "almost rowhouses".
Would you consider San Francisco a row-house city?
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Old 10-09-2013, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Some of the gaps between houses in San Francisco are so small it looks as if humans couldn't get into the space between the houses. I wonder how they do painting/routine maintenance of the side walls?
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Old 10-09-2013, 02:25 PM
 
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In some of these neighborhoods the houses are so close they should be considered attached housing.
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Old 10-09-2013, 05:09 PM
 
Location: Tampa - St. Louis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Some of the gaps between houses in San Francisco are so small it looks as if humans couldn't get into the space between the houses. I wonder how they do painting/routine maintenance of the side walls?
Most of St. Louis is similar
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Old 10-11-2013, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Shaw.
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Much of the rowhouse cities have one thing in common--population booms before WWII (particularly of working class Americans). Most of these cities also had industrial booms, so they needed a lot of homes for workers on short notice. DC is a notable exception because its population boom was because of the New Deal (and the Civil War before that). DC had the same need, but for a different reason.

There are also Victorian (and older) townhouses in a lot of these cities. I'm not exactly sure why, but they were chic, so the wealthy built them. I feel that's true of any old city, not just those in the "rowhouse belt."
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Old 10-11-2013, 12:53 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
There are also Victorian (and older) townhouses in a lot of these cities. I'm not exactly sure why, but they were chic, so the wealthy built them. I feel that's true of any old city, not just those in the "rowhouse belt."
In Britain, townhouse meant a big city house owned by the aristocracy (as opposed to their country house), while the term "terraced house" was used for other attached buildings. In the U.S. context modern "townhouse" development has sort of made the term useless for its original meaning, so I consider calling everything (even big ones like this) rowhouses.

Throughout colonial America, the rowhouse was seen as the "proper" way to build a sturdy city house (since it was how British cities were constructed). By the 1870s this style of housing fell out of favor in New England and the South (and never much caught on in the Midwest and West). By the 1920s, as I said, it basically had fallen out of favor everywhere but Philadelphia and Baltimore.
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Old 10-11-2013, 01:43 PM
 
Location: The City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
In Britain, townhouse meant a big city house owned by the aristocracy (as opposed to their country house), while the term "terraced house" was used for other attached buildings. In the U.S. context modern "townhouse" development has sort of made the term useless for its original meaning, so I consider calling everything (even big ones like this) rowhouses.

Throughout colonial America, the rowhouse was seen as the "proper" way to build a sturdy city house (since it was how British cities were constructed). By the 1870s this style of housing fell out of favor in New England and the South (and never much caught on in the Midwest and West). By the 1920s, as I said, it basically had fallen out of favor everywhere but Philadelphia and Baltimore.
But maybe today the modern Townhouse is the reincarnation

Even widely used in New Urbanist developments

Here is an example from relatively recent construction (maybe 10 or so years) in Reston VA

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Resto...id=po-21563815
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