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Old 10-17-2013, 07:27 AM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
Draw a triangle with the corner points at New York, Washington DC and Pittsburgh. Areas inside and near the triangle are where the most significant cluster and concentration of rowhouses are in the United States. The quintessential rowhouse states are Pennsylvania and Maryland. Accurate assessment?
I think that's pretty accurate -- at the very least, that's the "epicenter" of the the "Rowhouse Belt."

I would definitely give honorable mention to Virginia (Alexandria; Richmond) and New Jersey (Camden; Newark; Trenton; Hoboken/Jersey City)
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Old 10-17-2013, 07:34 AM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
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Originally Posted by tcave360 View Post
Here are more examples of DC Rowhomes~These are not mine.
Great shots! It's truly remarkable how many intact/well-preserved rowhouse neighborhoods there are in DC.

As cities like Baltimore and Philadelphia continue to revitalize, I hope they can take similar cues in terms of historically appropriate restoration. It really provides a great sense of place.
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Old 10-17-2013, 08:08 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
Draw a triangle with the corner points at New York, Washington DC and Pittsburgh. Areas inside and near the triangle are where the most significant cluster and concentration of rowhouses are in the United States. The quintessential rowhouse states are Pennsylvania and Maryland. Accurate assessment?
I'm not sure I would say Maryland as a whole is characterized by rowhouses. Baltimore sure, along with a few nearby suburbs like Dundalk. The core of Annapolis has very old zero setback "city homes" which in some cases are attached to neighbors, which gives it a row-like feel in places.

Oddly, the best preserved old rowhouse areas outside Baltimore are in Western Maryland - Hancock, Frederick, and especially Hagerstown, which is pretty similar to a small South-Central PA city like Lebanon or York. I find it interesting, given they're all to the west of the end of the small-town rowhouse belt in Eastern PA.
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Old 10-17-2013, 08:16 AM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
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Troy NY has some to-die-for rowhouses, many with neat bay windows in front. Perhaps this is as far north as the rowhouse typology gets? Some great streetscapes in Troy...mucho underrated!

I noticed Bethlehem and..especially.... South Bethlehem have a lot of rows...supposedly nearby Allentown is filled with row houses. As is Reading

Yet, not too far north of Bethlehem.... Scranton and Wilkes-Barre don't. There are some, but to the extent you find in the Lehigh Valley.. So there is sort of a "row house line" running through PA (Johsntown and Altoona are mostly non-rowhouse, too).

I noticed there arent many rows in the Connecticut River Valley...Hartford and points north. Harford has its own urban housing typology of stand-alone flat buildings on tight lots, but not rows. Interesting place.
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Old 10-17-2013, 08:25 AM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
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^
probably should qualify that by saying Pbgh has a good rowhouse neighborhood on the South Side...dense, attached housing.... Also maybe the Mexican War Streets (if youd say those are rows?).

@@@@

In this part of the US you get a sort of quasi-row house. These are long structures built at the same time, of a few units per structure. Not really the same kind of typology one finds in the Mid-atlantic, though, and they dont comprise entire neighborhoods. Columbus, OH, is the best example of this quasi-rowhouse typology.
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Old 10-17-2013, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
Troy NY has some to-die-for rowhouses, many with neat bay windows in front. Perhaps this is as far north as the rowhouse typology gets? Some great streetscapes in Troy...mucho underrated!
Yeah, Troy (and some surrounding smaller cities) are the furthest extension of the Rowhouse belt. Albany has some nice ones as well. Oddly Schenectady, which isn't too far away, lacks rowhouses entirely, although it does have a surviving historic neighborhood with some similarities.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
I noticed Bethlehem and..especially.... South Bethlehem have a lot of rows...supposedly nearby Allentown is filled with row houses. As is Reading

Yet, not too far north of Bethlehem.... Scranton and Wilkes-Barre don't. There are some, but to the extent you find in the Lehigh Valley.. So there is sort of a "row house line" running through PA (Johsntown and Altoona are mostly non-rowhouse, too).
The reason for the difference dates back to settlement patterns. The Wyoming valley was settled by pioneers from Connecticut, who took the New England models of house-building (detached, wood, and with moderate setbacks from the street) with them. In contrast, the Lehigh Valley was settled by Pennsylvanian settlers coming from the Philadelphia area, who took their own vernacular construction style (brick houses which were attached with zero setback) with them.

I'm less sure about why there are not really rowhouses in Pennsylvania between Gettysburg and Pittsburgh. True rows are actually pretty rare even as soon as you get out of Pittsburgh city limits, although a few of the river boroughs have some small stands of them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
I noticed there arent many rows in the Connecticut River Valley...Hartford and points north. Harford has its own urban housing typology of stand-alone flat buildings on tight lots, but not rows. Interesting place.
Growing up in Connecticut, I had no idea there were any rowhouses in the state. However, there's a nice stand of rowhouses in New Haven. A few survive even in Bridgeport. I think what happened is Connecticut cities started out fairly small, and had some rowhouse neighborhoods just as Boston did. However, urban renewal wiped out most of the rows (first to build mills, and later to expand downtowns).
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Old 10-17-2013, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
probably should qualify that by saying Pbgh has a good rowhouse neighborhood on the South Side...dense, attached housing.... Also maybe the Mexican War Streets (if youd say those are rows?).
It's a true row if there's more than two houses with zero space between them. They don't need to be built all at one time as part of a builder's plan. Not much was built in most cities in groups of more than two before the 1890s anyway. Wouldn't you call this a row?
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Old 10-17-2013, 09:45 AM
 
Location: The City
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Yeah, Troy (and some surrounding smaller cities) are the furthest extension of the Rowhouse belt. Albany has some nice ones as well. Oddly Schenectady, which isn't too far away, lacks rowhouses entirely, although it does have a surviving historic neighborhood with some similarities.



The reason for the difference dates back to settlement patterns. The Wyoming valley was settled by pioneers from Connecticut, who took the New England models of house-building (detached, wood, and with moderate setbacks from the street) with them. In contrast, the Lehigh Valley was settled by Pennsylvanian settlers coming from the Philadelphia area, who took their own vernacular construction style (brick houses which were attached with zero setback) with them.

I'm less sure about why there are not really rowhouses in Pennsylvania between Gettysburg and Pittsburgh. True rows are actually pretty rare even as soon as you get out of Pittsburgh city limits, although a few of the river boroughs have some small stands of them.



Growing up in Connecticut, I had no idea there were any rowhouses in the state. However, there's a nice stand of rowhouses in New Haven. A few survive even in Bridgeport. I think what happened is Connecticut cities started out fairly small, and had some rowhouse neighborhoods just as Boston did. However, urban renewal wiped out most of the rows (first to build mills, and later to expand downtowns).

Maybe the terrain and development pattern - there is not much really between these areas even today. Mountainous and probably more Appalachian. Whereas Gettysburgh and east is on the more fertile flat farmlands and had more decent sized towns and cities that developed earlier and more intensly (like say York and Lancaster) whereas even more hilly mountainous areas further east were close enough and influenced enough by Philly and the railroads that the similar housing stock likely followed.

I have seen a few rowhomes in places like Clarksburg and Parkersburg WV actually but they seem more rare. I think Marrietta OH as well (Maybe even Zanesville OH, but dont remember) whereas further north in Ohio like Akron on up they seem virtually non existent
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Old 10-17-2013, 09:48 AM
 
Location: The City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
It's a true row if there's more than two houses with zero space between them. They don't need to be built all at one time as part of a builder's plan. Not much was built in most cities in groups of more than two before the 1890s anyway. Wouldn't you call this a row?

Much of Society Hill, QV etc would have rowhouse stock predating the 1800s.

I lived in a row house on Queen Street that was built in the 1700's here

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Phila...,277.51,,0,1.5
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Old 10-17-2013, 09:51 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post

I'm less sure about why there are not really rowhouses in Pennsylvania between Gettysburg and Pittsburgh. True rows are actually pretty rare even as soon as you get out of Pittsburgh city limits, although a few of the river boroughs have some small stands of them.
Seems like as you go further west, cities tended to be built less densely. Plus Eastern PA is older. Similarly, density-wise smaller New England cities have more dense urban neighborhoods than western upstate NY. Same is probably true of Western PA vs Eastern PA, though Pittsburgh is denser than anything in upstate NY.
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