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Old 10-11-2013, 07:02 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Despite the myths about the south being especially humid, compared to the West, the Northeast and the Southeast are nearly identical in terms of humidity. It's just the warmer it is, the worse humidity feels. Regardless, nowhere is dry on the Atlantic coast until you get down to Brazil.

That said, some people here have overstated things a bit. If you are right on the Atlantic Ocean, the climate is generally milder, with slightly warmer winters in the North, and cooler summers in the south. Windier as well however. Somewhere like the Outer Banks you'd end up with the weather seldom below freezing in the winter, and rarely above 90 in the summer, but still pretty clearly have a four-seasons climate.
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Old 10-11-2013, 09:03 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wrcousert View Post
It's cold in the north, hot and humid in the south. Is there someplace in the middle with moderate weather most of the year?
It is not accurate to say that the north is generally cold. In fact, most of the northeast gets hot and humid in the summer - many days are 90 to 100 degrees F or more. It is cold in the northeast mainly in the winter.

The southern California coast has mild and moderate weather during most of the year. The northeast has a 4-season climate. The southeast has milder winters and hotter summers. (Winter in Miami is practically nonexistent). So, they are all distinct climates.
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Old 10-11-2013, 10:14 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
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No. The entire east coast is very humid. HOWEVER....in the Northeast, the months of April/May and September/October get plenty of days that are nearly identical to SoCal weather. It's about 65-75, often sunny and somewhat dry.
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Old 10-12-2013, 12:49 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
No. The entire east coast is very humid. HOWEVER....in the Northeast, the months of April/May and September/October get plenty of days that are nearly identical to SoCal weather. It's about 65-75, often sunny and somewhat dry.
That's pretty much Central Florida and South Florida in the winter. 75 degrees and dry. I experienced the most perfect weather day ever on one December afternoon in Orlando. I had a cousin from Orlando who was living in San Diego at the time, and he said that's how the daily weather was in San Diego.
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Old 10-12-2013, 08:42 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duderino View Post
Sorry, but no. If there was, it'd most likely be the largest city on the East Coast due to desirability.
It would be interesting to see how the east coast could be more densely populated than it is already. :-)
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Old 10-12-2013, 09:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BoringOldMike4554 View Post
If there was a place on the East Coast with the same kind of weather as California, it would also probably have the same kind of population. The answer is no. California is one of a kind in N.A.
FTR, the east coast is much, much more populous than California. If you transposed the outline of California over a similarly sized land area on the east coast; it would be more populated. So this isn't really accurate.

As far as the original question goes. No. The east coast is split between humid continental and humid subtropical climate; with South Florida having a tropical climate.. The Atlantic coast of the US is upwind from the very warm waters of the gulf of Mexico and sits adjacent to the gulf stream waters that run up the whole coast; creating a much more humid climate. However, as others have said; the coastal areas are far more moderated than areas further inland. This is similar to California. The further east you go in Southern California; the hotter it gets in the summer, and colder in the winter.

Last edited by just_sayin'; 10-12-2013 at 09:35 PM..
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Old 10-13-2013, 09:03 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,333 posts, read 19,609,757 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by just_sayin' View Post
FTR, the east coast is much, much more populous than California. If you transposed the outline of California over a similarly sized land area on the east coast; it would be more populated. So this isn't really accurate.
It never ceases to amaze me the kind of things people will believe - even in spite of information that is accessible to them at the click of a button.

I have come to the realization that quite a lot of humans are purely emotional creatures. Facts and rational arguments - no matter how well presented or often repeated - just don't register for them. That's why I have stopped responding to these kinds of posts for the most part. It's much better to let these posters figure things out on their own. Truth may be in the eye of the beholder. lol.
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Old 03-22-2016, 01:16 AM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
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If you can deal with 95 degrees with a dewpoint of 77 (55% afternoon humidity), then the best you'll do is Corpus Christi or Brownsville, TX. Besides being similar temps in the winter, they have their sunniest weather in the summer (July&August) and rainfall drops off those two summer months before picking up again in September
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Old 03-22-2016, 05:55 AM
 
286 posts, read 216,744 times
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Summer 2015 in upstate New York was pretty damn near SoCal weather , it was 60-80 all summer almost non existent humidity which is the first time I could ever remember that here , barely Rained at all not even our typical afternoon thunderstorm . I don't think we hit 90+ all summer maybe once or twice .
And we all assumed we would pay for it this winter and aside from a 2 week stretch with wind chills close to 40 below our winter was like Portland 30 and 40s missed every snowstorm it was all rain .

Only received 6 inches of snow this year , we usually get that in half a day of just one of our many snowstorms . It was also 70 on Christmas I was kayaking usually we have 10 inches of snow on the ground .
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Old 03-22-2016, 07:47 AM
 
1,687 posts, read 992,812 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by just_sayin' View Post
FTR, the east coast is much, much more populous than California. If you transposed the outline of California over a similarly sized land area on the east coast; it would be more populated. So this isn't really accurate.

As far as the original question goes. No. The east coast is split between humid continental and humid subtropical climate; with South Florida having a tropical climate.. The Atlantic coast of the US is upwind from the very warm waters of the gulf of Mexico and sits adjacent to the gulf stream waters that run up the whole coast; creating a much more humid climate. However, as others have said; the coastal areas are far more moderated than areas further inland. This is similar to California. The further east you go in Southern California; the hotter it gets in the summer, and colder in the winter.

Most of California, even on the coast, is mountain ranges.
The north east corridor is flat.
It's not hard to realize that. It's two largest metros are in the top 3 in the u.s for density.
If you go by median home prices coastal California is the most desirable real estate in America, outside of Manhattan.
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