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Old 10-24-2013, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Baghdad by the Bay (San Francisco, California)
3,530 posts, read 4,263,451 times
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Lots of them in California--Death Valley, high in the Sierra, islands offshore, or maybe a small pot farm on the side of a hill somewhere in Humboldt County...

Plenty of places to be far, far away from... everything.
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Old 10-25-2013, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
Southeastern Oregon. Once you get south of Ontario or Burns or east of Lakeview there's more pronghorn antelopes than people by a considerable ratio. You can drive two hours and not see even a town, maybe a small settlement here or there. It feels more like northern Nevada than even most of the rest of Eastern Oregon. Really is sort of America's outback.
I would agree that SE Oregon is amazingly remote and uninhabited, more like Nevada than most people realize. We drove through this summer, and there were stretches of several hours where we went without seeing any other cars at all. My wife kept mentioning that she felt like we were in some type of horror movie!

Here in Colorado, I'd say the most desolate regions of the state are on the far east plains or on the Western Slope, either to the NW or SW. There is a lot more wilderness and uninhabited space in this state than people are aware of. Of course, I don't think that many people are familiar with CO's geography beyond the Front Range and ski areas. From the huge uplift plateaus, mesas, and canyons to the middle of the San Juans, there are a lot of places that are completely devoid of people. And a lot of areas that no paved road comes close to reaching.....
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Old 10-25-2013, 07:15 PM
 
Location: IN
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Originally Posted by caphillsea77 View Post
There are wide open spaces all over the state but Northeastern New Mexico up around where it meets the pandhandle of Oklahoma is likely the most remote and isolated part of the state. It's just very sparsely settled high desert plains for the most part.
Harding County and Catron County, NM have the lowest population density of any county in the state at 0.2 and 0,5 people per square mile, with Catron County mostly comprised of the Gila National Forest.
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Old 10-25-2013, 08:01 PM
 
817 posts, read 1,924,668 times
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Key West
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Old 10-25-2013, 09:12 PM
 
14,111 posts, read 22,750,552 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bartonizer View Post
I would agree that SE Oregon is amazingly remote and uninhabited, more like Nevada than most people realize. We drove through this summer, and there were stretches of several hours where we went without seeing any other cars at all. My wife kept mentioning that she felt like we were in some type of horror movie!

Here in Colorado, I'd say the most desolate regions of the state are on the far east plains or on the Western Slope, either to the NW or SW. There is a lot more wilderness and uninhabited space in this state than people are aware of. Of course, I don't think that many people are familiar with CO's geography beyond the Front Range and ski areas. From the huge uplift plateaus, mesas, and canyons to the middle of the San Juans, there are a lot of places that are completely devoid of people. And a lot of areas that no paved road comes close to reaching.....
Man, the West can be a lonely place. This peaks my interest even more in wanting to visit those states West of Texas.
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Old 10-26-2013, 02:26 AM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
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I think in West Virginia, even though whole state seems to have a remote reputation, the Potomac Highlands seem the most remote. While they border on smaller out of state metro areas like Winchester, Virginia and Cumberland, Maryland, there are actually very few large towns or cities within West Virginia there. It is far away from WV's major population centers like Charleston, Huntington, Morgantown, Fairmont, Clarksburg or Beckley. Extreme southern West Virginia around Bluefields is also pretty remote.
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Old 10-26-2013, 05:36 AM
 
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I would guess the north fork of Long Island and Plum Island (near its tip) in NY.
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Old 10-26-2013, 06:23 AM
 
21,187 posts, read 30,351,954 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin from Tampa View Post
Key West
Many don't realize how remote Key West is, and how long Florida reaches. It's a three hour drive from Key West to Miami alone. It's nearly 9 hours to the Georgia state line on I-95 and 13 hours to the Alabama state line in the panhandle via I-75/I-10.
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Old 10-26-2013, 07:00 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
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Okefenokee Swamp.

www.okefenokee.com
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Old 10-27-2013, 12:03 AM
 
817 posts, read 1,924,668 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
Many don't realize how remote Key West is, and how long Florida reaches. It's a three hour drive from Key West to Miami alone. It's nearly 9 hours to the Georgia state line on I-95 and 13 hours to the Alabama state line in the panhandle via I-75/I-10.
Yep.

Now, if you're talking about desolate (as opposed to remote), my answer for Florida would be the middle of the Everglades, or somewhere along the Georgia border in the Okeefokee swamp.
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