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Old 11-28-2015, 12:22 PM
 
403 posts, read 522,645 times
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I think it's because the first immigrants lived far away from home, with people from many countries (Germany, Ireland, England ..) so they tried to fit in by being friendly. Whereas in Europe people never had to make that effort because they fit in naturally.
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Old 11-28-2015, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
5,974 posts, read 7,341,634 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canadian citizen View Post
Brad...


Here just a few differences, between Canadians and Americans.


In the city of Toronto, which is the largest in Canada, there are exactly TWO retail shops that sell firearms. TWO. Ponder that for a minute......


In the almost 150 years that Canada has been a self governing country, we have had ONE politician who was killed while in office......and his case was found to be a bungled robbery in front of his boarding house in Ottawa, after a late night sitting of Parliament, and the year was 1869. Compare that to the US, starting with Lincoln......


Canada has never started a war with any one...........But the ones that we have fought in....we have been on the winning side every time. Canada HAS been invaded twice before.............BY the USA both times. And both times were a defeat for guess who ?


Canada's motto is ....Peace, Order and Good Government.


We do what we say we will do, support our friends, and help other countries. Not a bad plan, eh ?


Jim B.
Why don't you just say how you really feel about us instead of running around the edges? Of course Canada wouldn't ever start a war, it's not a large power by any stretch of the imagination and Canada wasn't even a country when the US tried to invade it. Also, Canada was not a country in the sense like most other non commonwealth nations until 1931, with the passage of the Statue of Westminster as it was a dominion up until that point and it did not completely remove ties with the UK until the passage of the Canada Act of 1982. Canada had no choice but to join into the fighting of World War 1 because it could not make its own foreign policy at that time.


I'm glad the Canadians I know in person aren't so full of it like those I see online.

Last edited by bradjl2009; 11-28-2015 at 02:31 PM..
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Old 11-28-2015, 02:24 PM
 
Location: Bran's tree
11,115 posts, read 4,895,451 times
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It creeps me out a bit because it's usually very superficial. People are so gregarious, you wonder why this person is trying to act like your best friend so quickly, and when you finally warm up to them, they've gone back to all business and forget about you.

In the country I'm from and the others I've lived in and traveled to, people aren't all up in each others faces with big smiles and enthusiasm, but if you get to know them, you will have a solid friend.

I've lived in the US for years, but I don't think I'll ever quite adjust to that superficial friendliness.

My theory is that the US is such a capitalist/every man for himself culture, that people are always on the hustle. Be extroverted, network, make a sale, or die.
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Old 11-28-2015, 07:37 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,177,286 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohhwanderlust View Post
It creeps me out a bit because it's usually very superficial. People are so gregarious, you wonder why this person is trying to act like your best friend so quickly, and when you finally warm up to them, they've gone back to all business and forget about you.

In the country I'm from and the others I've lived in and traveled to, people aren't all up in each others faces with big smiles and enthusiasm, but if you get to know them, you will have a solid friend.

I've lived in the US for years, but I don't think I'll ever quite adjust to that superficial friendliness.

My theory is that the US is such a capitalist/every man for himself culture, that people are always on the hustle. Be extroverted, network, make a sale, or die.
Sounds like California; not the US as a whole.
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Old 11-28-2015, 09:39 PM
 
Location: Virginia
350 posts, read 467,083 times
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I'm originally from the "south", I've lived all over the country and have friends and family in Canada.

Friendliness and extrovertedness varies GREATLY around the country.

In the south people can be extremely polite, genuinely friendly, and VERY extroverted (and of course they can be not-so-much).

I lived in Portland. People in the Northwest are EXTREMELY polite, but can be very introverted and hard to get to know. (see :"Seattle Freeze"). I would say something very to-the-point, being very extroverted (my southern nature) and you could feel the discomfort in the room. Northwesterner culture is very similar to Canadian culture. The cultures of Portland and Seattle are very similar to Vancouver. Northwestern US culture is much closer to Canadian culture than Eastern US vs Canada. Maybe the NW culture is our most similar to European culture?

I lived in Chicago. It was a mix but in general people were very friendly for a mega city.

I've visited NYC and Philly a bunch of times. They tend to be very blunt, extroverted, and direct (which people label as rude), if they don't like you they will tell you, if they do they will also tell you.. but I've found people from both places actually to be very friendly. In particular, people in Philly. In NYC, I've had people recognize that I was lost and come up to help. Philly extroverted bluntness is pretty much the polar opposite of Pacific Northwest introverted meek politeness.

DC and DC burbs where I currently live: Many people are incredibly cold and unfriendly. I've had many conversation with foreign nationals and people from other parts of the country about how these people behave. The only place I've lived, where in a safe, "cute" suburbs, my wife and/or I can be walking our baby in a stroller, pass someone else with a stroller and say "hi" or just smile and they often either:
- ignore you
- glare at you like you're a crazy person
Same for at workplaces, people will ignore you or just look at you if you say "hi" or smile. I've gotten to the point where I've often stopped saying "hi" or smiling at people, which really upsets me. A coworker from Minnesota and I have talked about remaining vigilant about "not becoming one of them".
And no, I'm not a nut. Many people I know talk about the same thing. DC and it's burbs are notorious for being very hard to make friends. It seems to be a classist thing. If they think you are below them or can't further their career, you are worthless. I make a good salary and have a really good career but I don't feel the need to club people over the head with it. Anyway, in general the personality of people in DC area goes completely against the friendly American stereotype.

I've heard people say people in Boston are more unfriendly than DC and I can't imagine it. I've never visited or lived there so I can't say, but if that's true, what the hell is going on in Boston?!
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Old 11-29-2015, 11:24 PM
 
Location: West Korea
685 posts, read 445,921 times
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Friendly and unfriendly people are found everywhere seems to be the general consensus, but Americans might appear slightly more extroverted to quite a bit more extroverted. Another factor that people could forgetting is the whole language barrier and how that can factor into the confidence of general social interactions.

I do, however, think that people in parts of South America despite the language barrier are easily some of the more friendly people found around the globe, even compared to people in the US South(the gold standard stereotype). And not to forget but Aussies and Kiwis tend to be quite friendly. Not really sure you could pinpoint an exact origin rather than look at an overall picture and see how attitudes have developed, that's my opinion.
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Old 11-30-2015, 01:59 AM
 
Location: Bran's tree
11,115 posts, read 4,895,451 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunion Powder View Post
Sounds like California; not the US as a whole.
Could be that. I'm in the Bay Area.
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Old 11-30-2015, 06:05 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,127 posts, read 35,134,347 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chava61 View Post
Actually people in NYC are quite friendly.
I agree, and your neighbors really have your back there. At least that was my experience.
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