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Old 10-29-2013, 03:00 PM
 
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Old 10-29-2013, 10:47 PM
 
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IMO, the Kansas suburbs of KCMO (Overland Park, Olathe, Lenexa, etc.) and are more Midwest/Sunbelt hybrid than Indy and Columbus.
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Old 10-30-2013, 07:21 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,816,975 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
To me Columbus has the feel of a sunbelt city due to:

1) growing boomtown economy
2) a lot of new sprawl
3) fairly flat
4) younger population
5) sort of outside-the-box approach to things...fresher than other Ohio cities.
6) better educated/more white-collar.

Historically tho, Cols used to be more industrial than people realize, despite being the state capital and having OSU (OSU became a big deal more after WWII).

The "southern" thing you pick up in Cols comes from the big Southern Appalachian migration after WWII. "Readin', Writin', Route 23" (as in the Dwight Yokum song)...the hillbilly highway north....Cols shares this with Dayton, Cincy, and smaller SW Ohio cities...the "briar diaspora". But theres more going on there than that.
Since when did flatness become a sunbelt defining characteristic?
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Old 10-30-2013, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,322,771 times
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Sunbelt doesn't mean southern guys. California is sun-belt, as is Arizona, Nevada, Colorado, etc. I'd also argue that portions of the South lack any sun-belt cities (E.G., Kentucky, Mississippi, Arkansas, arguably Alabama.)

Central Ohio/Indiana does have a bit of a drawl, to my ears. But then again, I grew up in New England. When I first moved to Pittsburgh, I thought some people here sounded a bit southern.
Yes, Pittsburgh can have it too. I think it does help to be from a completely different region (linguistically) though, like New England or the Upper Midwest (or elsewhere).
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Old 10-30-2013, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CuriousAboutCA View Post
IMO, the Kansas suburbs of KCMO (Overland Park, Olathe, Lenexa, etc.) and are more Midwest/Sunbelt hybrid than Indy and Columbus.
True, but I'm not certain that is specific to KC. Chicago has boom-burbs, so does Minneapolis, so does Columbus and Indy obviously. None of these cities though has suburbs like those in the Southwest, with air-tight density combined with big-box retail and sprawl -- a kind of weird urban/suburban hybrid that is very characteristic of the Sun Belt/Southwest. In most Midwestern cities development of that kind in the suburbs would be seen as very "dense" and "urban".
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Old 10-30-2013, 08:29 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
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Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
Since when did flatness become a sunbelt defining characteristic?
Maybe he meant that subdivisions are built on flat land, whereas most older cities had housing built along all kinds of terrain, including steep inclines? I'm not even sure this is true though, since many Sun Belt cities are in hilly or mountainous areas and I'm sure they also build along hills.
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Old 10-30-2013, 09:07 AM
 
Location: roaming gnome
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No, they are *very* midwestern. They just were historically smaller places and have had new growth. If you go into suburbs of larger midwestern cities they will look the same and culturally almost replicas.
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Old 10-30-2013, 10:03 AM
 
Location: Phoenix
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
They are sunbelt-like for one reason - they both have a large number of suburban-style neighborhoods within the city center. In the case of Indianapolis, it's due to a city-county merger which happened in 1970. In the case of Columbus, it was because the city began requiring annexation into the city in exchange for expanding water/sewer coverage in the 1950s, which ultimately resulted in the majority of the core county (and tendrils in several other counties) joining the city. The large number of suburbs in the city has resulted in much more moderate/conservative local governance than in most other large cities in the North, which is in turn thought of as a sun-belt characteristic.

Indianapolis's core is also very sun-belt like, insofar as urban renewal destroyed everything 19th century and interesting (Indianapolis apparently once had some fine rowhouse neighborhoods) in favor of mid-century megaprojects. The residential areas surrounding the core of Indianapolis almost all have declining population - pretty typical for a rust-belt city actually.

Columbus retains some nice historic neighborhoods near the core, so it's more of a hybrid than Indianapolis. It's still much better at being a giant agglomeration of suburbs than a city though, and perhaps not much unlike places like Atlanta, where focus on near-downtown living has also risen in recent years.

Edit: Other cities in the Midwest with similar "broad city limits" are Kansas City, Omaha, Lincoln - basically all of the plains states metros. Sun-belt growth comes down to suburbs in the city, more or less.
This post is full of falsehoods.

Columbus' local goverance is 100 percent democrat controlled. The city and main county are both liberal to moderate. In the 90s and before it was a moderate to conservative place. This has long changed. And yes it is more liberal than Indy.

The city never annexed suburbs, it annexed undeveloped land (as you said in the 50s and on) but then it developed this land/townships. Thus the "newer post WWII" city is pretty dense but suburban in nature of development.

Also, as you stated the urban core of columbus is very intact and it does have a good balance between the "central/older city" and the "new/post WWII" city. Columbus' urban neighborhoods are very NE/great lakes in character and architecture. So yes it is more of a hybrid.
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Old 10-30-2013, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,102 posts, read 4,741,940 times
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Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
It's Southern to us Northerners, especially those of us from the Far North, like MN, WI, MI, ME, etc. There is not drawl in Maine, NH or VT, btw......I have no idea where you get that notion.
I said NASCAR fans and drawl, perhaps I should have written and/or.

Besides, it may "seem southern" to you, but that doesn't make it southern. Actually it makes you ignorant.
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Old 10-30-2013, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,322,771 times
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Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
I said NASCAR fans and drawl, perhaps I should have written and/or.

Besides, it may "seem southern" to you, but that doesn't make it southern. Actually it makes you ignorant.
Name-calling, are we? (Mods have given me a "time-out" for less)

Let's just put it this way: the characteristics I think relate to the South are more strongly rooted in Columbus, Cincy and Indy than anywhere else I've ever lived, including St. Louis. At the end of the day what things SEEM to be are what we carry with us, not what they are. A tomato may technically be a fruit but who really thinks of a tomato when somebody says "do you want some fruit"? I'm not even saying these two cities are Southern, I'm saying that they have more characteristics of the Southern part of the Sun Belt than any other Midwestern cities. I've lived in 5 different Midwest cities, so I feel like I can have a conversation about what I think or what I believe without being called "ignorant".
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