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Old 10-30-2013, 02:42 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,099 posts, read 4,735,887 times
Reputation: 5374

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
Name-calling, are we? (Mods have given me a "time-out" for less)

Let's just put it this way: the characteristics I think relate to the South are more strongly rooted in Columbus, Cincy and Indy than anywhere else I've ever lived, including St. Louis. At the end of the day what things SEEM to be are what we carry with us, not what they are. A tomato may technically be a fruit but who really thinks of a tomato when somebody says "do you want some fruit"? I'm not even saying these two cities are Southern, I'm saying that they have more characteristics of the Southern part of the Sun Belt than any other Midwestern cities. I've lived in 5 different Midwest cities, so I feel like I can have a conversation about what I think or what I believe without being called "ignorant".
First off, ignorance is a state of mind, not a title. So calling somebody ignorant is not name-calling. For example, the way you took the term ignorant was ignorant of it's meaning.

Ignorant is also not necessarily an insult. I am ignorant of many things, so are you, so is everybody.

Baton Rouge, Hattiesburg, and Mobile have little to nothing in common with Columbus and Indianapolis. Calling them sun-belt is a major misuse of the name.

I know the 'Daytonatti" and Columbus areas very well, I am also very familiar with Ann Arbor and Detroit (for a more upper Midwestern point of reference). I live in the deep south, I lived IN a sun-belt city, I know Houston, New Orleans, Lafayette, Baton Rouge, Meridian, and Birmingham very well. I too have experience in this subject, on a broader scale than even you I dare say.
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Old 10-30-2013, 08:32 PM
 
66 posts, read 97,616 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cbusflyer View Post
Columbus and Indianapolis seem a little out of place in the Midwest. They are certainly Midwest cities, but their growth seems to be more aligned with sunbelt cities. Would you consider them to be a Midwest/Sunbelt hybrid?
No. They may be auto-centric cities, but they are not Southern or sunbelt cities in any way. Louisville is the northernmost city that has a trace of Southern in it but even it is more Midwestern.
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Old 10-30-2013, 09:50 PM
 
321 posts, read 361,207 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityBrightLights View Post
No. They may be auto-centric cities, but they are not Southern or sunbelt cities in any way. Louisville is the northernmost city that has a trace of Southern in it but even it is more Midwestern.
Jacksonville seems sunbelt to me but not southern. I don't associate sunbelt with always being southern. I think sunbelt as being more sprawl and new and shiny.
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Old 10-30-2013, 10:17 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,317,013 times
Reputation: 4270
Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
First off, ignorance is a state of mind, not a title. So calling somebody ignorant is not name-calling. For example, the way you took the term ignorant was ignorant of it's meaning.

Ignorant is also not necessarily an insult. I am ignorant of many things, so are you, so is everybody.

Baton Rouge, Hattiesburg, and Mobile have little to nothing in common with Columbus and Indianapolis. Calling them sun-belt is a major misuse of the name.

I know the 'Daytonatti" and Columbus areas very well, I am also very familiar with Ann Arbor and Detroit (for a more upper Midwestern point of reference). I live in the deep south, I lived IN a sun-belt city, I know Houston, New Orleans, Lafayette, Baton Rouge, Meridian, and Birmingham very well. I too have experience in this subject, on a broader scale than even you I dare say.
Do you not recognize your bias here? I live WITHIN the Midwest, and you have experience in two vastly different regions. I'm saying that WITHIN the Midwest, those cities have more Southern characteristics. I'm not asking for your verification, I'm telling you my opinion. You're not from here. Similarly, I'd bet you can detect a major difference between parts of the South, and would be able to classify where in the South that the lines between South and Midwest start to blur, or between the South and Northeast. Can you not? That's what I'm doing, and that line is around I-70 or arguably I-80.

Last edited by Min-Chi-Cbus; 10-30-2013 at 10:27 PM..
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Old 10-30-2013, 10:25 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
5,991 posts, read 8,317,013 times
Reputation: 4270
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityBrightLights View Post
No. They may be auto-centric cities, but they are not Southern or sunbelt cities in any way. Louisville is the northernmost city that has a trace of Southern in it but even it is more Midwestern.
According to who? One poster even clarified why this phenomenon exists, and brought up the Hillbilly Highway as an example. To me that explains a lot.

Here's the deal....I'm from Minneapolis by way of Chicago. If you are a white person and come up to somebody with any drawl in their voice or have ANY characteristics of what's stereotypically Southern it's going to stand out. For example, nobody that I know who lives in Michigan, Illinois (Chicago), Ohio (Cleveland), Wisconsin or Minnesota would ever mutter a word like "ya'll" unless we were joking. Then when I hear a word like that being slung around in places like the cities mentioned I immediately associate them with places that are not Midwestern, even if they are and even if they are 100% different than cities in the South.
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Old 10-30-2013, 11:38 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,099 posts, read 4,735,887 times
Reputation: 5374
Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
Do you not recognize your bias here? I live WITHIN the Midwest, and you have experience in two vastly different regions. I'm saying that WITHIN the Midwest, those cities have more Southern characteristics. I'm not asking for your verification, I'm telling you my opinion. You're not from here. Similarly, I'd bet you can detect a major difference between parts of the South, and would be able to classify where in the South that the lines between South and Midwest start to blur, or between the South and Northeast. Can you not? That's what I'm doing, and that line is around I-70 or arguably I-80.
In that case you should say Columbus is different, but you shouldn't call it southern.

Nashville is not much like New Orleans, but it isn't northern just because it's closer to the north.
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Old 10-31-2013, 04:44 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
3,076 posts, read 5,450,297 times
Reputation: 4319
Quote:
Originally Posted by Min-Chi-Cbus View Post
It feels more Southern than most Midwestern cities, and as a Midwesterner/Northerner I felt uncomfortable at times in Columbus due to cultural differences I would only describe as being more "Southern", like drawl or love of NASCAR racing (over NFL football).
I would have to agree... as a true Northerner, the accents down in the middle of Ohio and Indiana sound southern-lite to my ears. There is definitely a drawl down there. Doesn't matter if it's technically "Southern" or not (I realize it isn't the same). But the vowels are more drawn out, etc. This is not a matter of opinion, it is a fact. There are certain characteristics of the accent down there that are more similar to Southern speech than to the Upper Midwest.

Like someone else said, though, I'm not saying it's a bad thing. It's just an observation.

Last edited by michigan83; 10-31-2013 at 05:17 AM..
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Old 10-31-2013, 05:09 AM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
4,245 posts, read 5,985,620 times
Reputation: 2967
When you get up to Toledo & Cleveland people start sounding like Chicagoans and people from Michigan & Wisconsin.
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