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Old 10-29-2013, 05:50 PM
 
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I would guess nationally the "East Europeans" probably outnumber the "Germans" by about 10 to 1. But maybe Cincinnati or St. Louis?
And These Are Jews Sample - YouTube
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Old 10-29-2013, 07:23 PM
 
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There has historically been division and even friction between the German and Eastern European Jews in St. Louis, but the lines seem to be blurring. There are Jewish country clubs in the suburbs of St. Louis that have traditionally been either for German Jews or Eastern European Jews, and certain synagogues are German while others are Eastern European. For a comprehensive history of the rift between German and Eastern European Jews in St. Louis, I highly recommend the two-volume series Zion of the Valley by Walter Ehrlich.
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Old 10-29-2013, 08:29 PM
 
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I'm assuming most of the people interviewed in the Cincinnati documentary were born around 1920 or 1925, probably fourth generation Americans. Interesting that in spite of their assimilation, celebration of Christmas etc. they still seemed to marry other German Jews. By now I assume the majority of German Jewish descendants have intermarried.
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Old 10-29-2013, 08:35 PM
 
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Originally Posted by STLgasm View Post
There has historically been division and even friction between the German and Eastern European Jews in St. Louis, but the lines seem to be blurring. There are Jewish country clubs in the suburbs of St. Louis that have traditionally been either for German Jews or Eastern European Jews, and certain synagogues are German while others are Eastern European. For a comprehensive history of the rift between German and Eastern European Jews in St. Louis, I highly recommend the two-volume series Zion of the Valley by Walter Ehrlich.
Reform temples in particular were thought of as "German" prior to WWII though now they're mostly comprised of third- and fourth-generation Jews of Eastern European descent. I believe the Reform movement has also become more "traditional" as it has Eastern European-ized and less "Protestant" (they used to do Sunday services etc.) For Tradition
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Old 10-30-2013, 01:30 PM
 
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Most of the Jews in the world today are of Ashkenazi decent, meaning descended from Jewish populations around the German area. Hebrews migrated to Europe after the second Temple was destroyed by the Romans and exiled them (known as the Great Diaspora in Jewish History). Those who fled to and settled in Europe intermarried a little among the Gentile populations, and of course with a colder climate you begin to adapt and your skin and eyes become lighter over time.

I know there are large German-Jewish populations here in Florida, especially in South Florida. I believe New York, LA, and Chicago have some large Jewish populations as well.
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Old 10-30-2013, 04:17 PM
 
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I'm not referring to Ashkenazi Jews vs. Sephardic Jews, but the East European vs. German branches of Ashkenazi Jews.

My question is basically whether there are still Jewish communities in the US where pre-1880 German descendants outnumber the post-1880 East Europeans.
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Old 10-31-2013, 01:11 PM
 
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Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
My question is basically whether there are still Jewish communities in the US where pre-1880 German descendants outnumber the post-1880 East Europeans.
Hudson Heights, in Upper Manhattan, probably fits the bill.

Hudson Heights was heavily settled by German Jewish refugees before WWII, especially intellectual and business elites. Obviously many are now very old, or have moved somewhere else, but they still have a strong presence.

Dr. Ruth Westheimer is probably the best known German Jew in Hudson Heights.
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Old 10-31-2013, 03:07 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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I think Hudson Heights got a lot of Russian Jews in the 80s and 90s, though. So it's no longer mostly German Jewish.
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Old 10-31-2013, 04:28 PM
 
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Washington Heights was the home to the biggest German Jewish refugee community and was known as Frankfurt-on-the-Hudson. The Upper West Side and Kew Gardens, Queens also received a lot of refugees.

As Steven Lowenstein noted in his book Washington Heights didn't really attract the intelligentsia, but rather small town German Jewry, although a lot of prominent people grew up in that community. The intellectual elites from Berlin and Vienna preferred the UWS.

Presumably Los Angeles (not sure where) and Chicago's Hyde Park received German and Austrian refugees as well.
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