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Old 10-31-2013, 05:35 AM
 
Location: a bar
2,565 posts, read 5,054,118 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
Sunrise and sunset move all over the horizon during the course of a year, especially the higher you go in latitude. It rises in the southeast and sets in the southwest from November through January, rises in the northeast and sets in the northwest from May through July, and only rises due east and sets due west in March and September.
^This is only true if you live on the equator.

If you're north of the Tropic of Cancer, which includes the entire continental US, the sun never rises in the northeast. Not once throughout the year. It's always to the south. Granted it's lower in the sky in the winter months, but it always follows a east to west trajectory, running perfectly parallel to to the earths equator. Ever want to find due south? Follow the sun at noon.
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Old 10-31-2013, 06:16 AM
 
Location: Boston, MA
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Compared to hilly or mountainous areas they are kinda boring. When the land is flat all you see is your immediate surroundings and the sky.
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Old 10-31-2013, 06:17 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,989 posts, read 41,979,923 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cliff Clavin View Post
^This is only true if you live on the equator.

If you're north of the Tropic of Cancer, which includes the entire continental US, the sun never rises in the northeast. Not once throughout the year. It's always to the south. Granted it's lower in the sky in the winter months, but it always follows a east to west trajectory, running perfectly parallel to to the earths equator. Ever want to find due south? Follow the sun at noon.
Wrong. The sun is always due south at noon in the continental US. But in the spring and summer it rises in the northeast and sets in the northwest. If you go north enough to close to the arctic circle, it rises and sets almost due north. You'd have to take a globe see what's lit up to see why this is.
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Old 10-31-2013, 06:18 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KerrTown View Post
You forgot about the skyscrapers in the CBDs and the views of the many miles away. That's a pro for Chicago and Houston and a con for L.A. and S.F. West Coast skylines suck due to the mountains. The flatness are an incentive to create aesthetic skylines and skyscrapers.
No, they're better. They have a good background with mountains.
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Old 10-31-2013, 06:53 AM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
No, they're better. They have a good background with mountains.
I agree, the mountain backdrops enhance the skyline creating a much more impressive spectacle for the whole picture. Also the way mountains are colored purple at sunsets and sunrises are totally inspiring.
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Old 10-31-2013, 07:14 AM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
21,322 posts, read 21,895,576 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FloridaPirate355 View Post
I know Texas and Georgia are not all flat, neither is Florida....
when you look up "flat" in the dictionary, a picture of Florida is used.
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Old 10-31-2013, 07:18 AM
 
Location: a bar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Wrong. The sun is always due south at noon in the continental US. But in the spring and summer it rises in the northeast and sets in the northwest. If you go north enough to close to the arctic circle, it rises and sets almost due north. You'd have to take a globe see what's lit up to see why this is.
If you or someone else can find an animated graphic online, post the link up. I did a quick search but couldn't find one. I'm curious now, and happy to admit I'm wrong if that is the case. Can't say I always payed attention in 3rd grade science class.
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Old 10-31-2013, 07:18 AM
 
Location: Boston, MA
11,745 posts, read 8,308,298 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cliff Clavin View Post
^This is only true if you live on the equator.

If you're north of the Tropic of Cancer, which includes the entire continental US, the sun never rises in the northeast. Not once throughout the year. It's always to the south. Granted it's lower in the sky in the winter months, but it always follows a east to west trajectory, running perfectly parallel to to the earths equator. Ever want to find due south? Follow the sun at noon.
The sun does rise in the NE and set in the NW in the summer. I know it never goes above 23.5 degrees North but because of the Earth's shape that's what happens. In the summer here in Boston the sun rises way up in the northeast corner of the sky and sets way up in the northwest corner.
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Old 10-31-2013, 07:28 AM
 
13,248 posts, read 17,784,157 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FloridaPirate355 View Post
I often see people knock down states like Florida, Texas (though Texas does have some mountains and Florida has some hills), Louisiana, Georgia etc...and I just don't understand why? I mean don't get me wrong, I love mountains too, but flat states are by no means ugly or boring. I think flat has several advantages, such as in Florida everything is more green as everything is closer to the water level. Flat also makes it easier to run and bike, as well as driving is easier. Plus IMO it makes everything feel large (don't ask me why, it just does to me).

So again I ask, what is wrong with states being flat or mostly flat?
Have you ever been to Georgia:>)
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Old 10-31-2013, 08:00 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,989 posts, read 41,979,923 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cliff Clavin View Post
If you or someone else can find an animated graphic online, post the link up. I did a quick search but couldn't find one. I'm curious now, and happy to admit I'm wrong if that is the case. Can't say I always payed attention in 3rd grade science class.
Maybe later. But this is a dramatic urban illustration of the fact:

Manhattanhenge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Check the map a bit below. If the sunset location aligns with the streets (on a day in late May), sunset must be NW, as Manhattan streets are 29N of west. Another diagram:

http://www.geography.hunter.cuny.edu...ths.3.days.htm

If you're almost at the Arctic Circle on summer solistice, the sun sweeps the entire sky, rising to its highest point when it's due south, and skimming the horizon at due north. Winter solistice, it would barely keep out at due south for a short time.
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