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Old 10-31-2013, 12:15 PM
 
20 posts, read 21,239 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
Don't group GA, and TX in with Florida. North Georgia is one of the most mountainous regions of the South. And Texas is only flat when people bring up "how much of a percentage of West Texas is flat" argument. Outside of that, Texas has 3 legit regions of HIGH Mountainous areas and HIGH elevation(The Hill Country, Llano Estacado, and the Big Bend Area). Texas is far from flat. Georgia and Texas shouldn't be grouped with Florida. Florida has to fight this battle by it's self. lol
Texas is a very flat state. Not as flat as Florida, of course, but most Texans live in the Houston and Dallas areas, and those areas are totally flat.

And the reason flat states are sometimes less appealing is because flat is boring compared to varied scenery.
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Old 10-31-2013, 02:46 PM
 
1,214 posts, read 1,391,219 times
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Why do people keep saying that flat places are ugly and boring? I love mountains and hills too, but flat places are just as beautiful in their own way.

If you think these places are ugly then there is something wrong with you:

Preserving the Beauty of FL 2009

Images of Illinois

* Official TEXAS Forum - PHOTO Thread *

Georgia Pic thread..

Kansas pictures

Nebraska Pictures
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Old 10-31-2013, 02:49 PM
 
14,111 posts, read 22,756,342 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodward1 View Post
Texas is a very flat state. Not as flat as Florida, of course, but most Texans live in the Houston and Dallas areas, and those areas are totally flat.

And the reason flat states are sometimes less appealing is because flat is boring compared to varied scenery.
Like I said, Texas is only "FLAT" when you determine how flat a state is by who lives where in the state. How can a state that has the Hill Country, Big Bend, and other plateaus be considered a flat state? Texas Highest peak(Guadalupe Peak) is higher than every single states Highest peaks East of the Mississippi.

Last edited by polo89; 10-31-2013 at 03:20 PM..
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Old 10-31-2013, 02:55 PM
 
1,214 posts, read 1,391,219 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
Like I said, Texas is only "FLAT" when you determine how flat a state is by who lives where in the state. How can a state that has the Hill Country, Big Bend, and other plateaus be considered a flat state? Texas Highest peak(Guadalupe Peak) is higher than every single state Highest peaks East of the Mississippi.
Obviously not all of Texas is flat, just a good portion of it is. I know Central Texas has some mountains and hills. Come to think of it, I don't think there is a state that is completely 100% flat. Even here in Florida we have some hills in the northern parts.
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Old 10-31-2013, 03:09 PM
 
Location: Bothell, Washington
2,701 posts, read 4,670,319 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
No, they're better. They have a good background with mountains.
Yes, definitely. Images of downtown Seattle with its dramatic mountain backdrop (Mount Rainier, especially) is far, far better to look at than a skyline on flat terrain. If downtown Seattle was uprooted and dropped in the middle of Nebraska (where I am originally from), it would be far less interesting to look at.
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Old 10-31-2013, 03:10 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,988 posts, read 41,959,650 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FloridaPirate355 View Post
Why do people keep saying that flat places are ugly and boring? I love mountains and hills too, but flat places are just as beautiful in their own way.

If you think these places are ugly then there is something wrong with you:

Images of Illinois
Ignoring the city/town photos where the natural landscape is less important, the best natural landscapes in that link have some slight hills. If it were hillier, they'd look prettier.
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Old 10-31-2013, 03:21 PM
 
Location: a bar
2,565 posts, read 5,052,668 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Maybe later. But this is a dramatic urban illustration of the fact:

Manhattanhenge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Check the map a bit below. If the sunset location aligns with the streets (on a day in late May), sunset must be NW, as Manhattan streets are 29N of west. Another diagram:

sun.paths.3ex

If you're almost at the Arctic Circle on summer solistice, the sun sweeps the entire sky, rising to its highest point when it's due south, and skimming the horizon at due north. Winter solistice, it would barely keep out at due south for a short time.
I just found this site, and rescind my earlier claim the sun never rises in the northeast.

http://www.suncalc.net/#/42.359,-71....13.07.04/04:58

However, I'll be back to reclaim my title of barfly know-it-all at somepoint.
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Old 10-31-2013, 05:38 PM
 
14,111 posts, read 22,756,342 times
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Yes Florida has higher elevated areas also:

https://maps.gstatic.com/mapfiles/transparent.png

https://maps.gstatic.com/mapfiles/transparent.png

https://maps.gstatic.com/mapfiles/transparent.png

https://maps.gstatic.com/mapfiles/transparent.png

https://maps.gstatic.com/mapfiles/transparent.png

https://maps.gstatic.com/mapfiles/transparent.png

https://maps.gstatic.com/mapfiles/transparent.png
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Old 10-31-2013, 05:44 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
654 posts, read 1,614,855 times
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Do these work for anyone? I was looking forward to seeing these higher elevations in Florida.
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Old 10-31-2013, 08:33 PM
 
56 posts, read 61,369 times
Reputation: 92
I'm not really sure WHY my mind did this, but when I landed in New Orleans a few months ago, my first thoughts were: "This is so depressingly flat." When I tried to sort out my feelings for flat places later, I thought of a few reasons as to why flat places seemed so depressing at first glance:

-Sledding. Here in Northwest DC/Montgomery County, there are plenty of hills to go sledding in the snow. I know you wouldn't really miss out on much in Houston, but when I went to Chicago there weren't many places we could sled.

-Road network: The roads are just so boring in places like Chicago and Houston, compared to DC, Pittsburgh or even Boston. Sure, the southern/eastern DC area is pretty flat, and the roads are pretty straight, but once you get north of Foggy Bottom, the roads are curvy, which make them interesting. Georgetown is beautiful because of the hills. Suburban sprawl isn't so, uh... distasteful, either, when it's hilly. The Northwest suburbs of DC are never boring. The roads are confusing, but they're interesting. Cumberland, MD, and Pittsburgh are beautiful because they're so hilly.

-Architecture: You need architecture to support the hilliness of the terrain. Basements are universal here in DC to solidify structures built on hills. You can't just plop the same house over and over again like you can in flat places. You have to build houses that specifically fit the terrain. This makes for more unique, and interesting, houses. Look at this Streetview of Pittsburgh. If it were Chicago or Houston, all of the buildings would be the same. Pittsburgh area: http://goo.gl/QFPx2u Compare with Chicago area: http://goo.gl/ACDDXw. Of course, this is a gross generalization which I realized was not the case later.

After much thought, I also realized there are a bunch of advantages to flat terrain:

-Biking was always hard to do in DC because of all the hills, especially on my way to school and, eventually, work. I went to my cousin's house in Chicago when I was young, and biking a few miles was a breeze compared to the same distance in DC.

-You can drive under-powered cars more easily. We have a Honda Civic. It gets worse. It's a hybrid. So if I have to start from a hill, it takes forever. When I drove around Chicago, it was so much faster.

-You have space to grow. Hillier cities are constrained by their geographies, so instead of creating the normal, hub-based development around the city center, there are "chunks" of development near the central city. Take the suburbs of DC. In the relatively flat eastern section of the city, roads radiate out of DC, creating a general, widespread area of urban development. Hyattsville, Bladensburg, Capitol Heights and Suitland are all basically just extensions of DC, exhibiting a similar grid-like road network. Although it's boring (see above), it allows for uniform growth and prevents a lot of bottlenecking. In the hillier suburbs of MD and much of Virginia, the geography has forced developments to be isolated. Take MoCo -- you have chunks of urban development: Bethesda, Rockville, Gaithersburg, Germantown. Between them? Hills, streams and forests. All of this adds up to create one of the busiest corridors in the region: I-270. Everyone is trying to get into DC, and there's only 1 way to get there from Central/Northern Montgomery County. Sometimes, a boring road network is more efficient.

-Driving in snow: Our entire neighborhood is composed of hills, and it's never fun to get up our hilly road, and then our hilly driveway, when there are 6" of snow on the ground (and in the DC area, it takes about 2 days to clear 6" of snow). It's not fun, and we lost our mailbox because of people sliding into it in the snow. Sure, Chicago gets more snow, but it's much easier to drive in the snow there. Well, it's never easy to drive in snow, but you know what I mean.

Mainly, hilly parts are interesting, but flat parts are efficient.
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