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Old 10-30-2013, 01:35 PM
 
1,214 posts, read 1,390,514 times
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I often see people knock down states like Florida, Texas (though Texas does have some mountains and Florida has some hills), Louisiana, Georgia etc...and I just don't understand why? I mean don't get me wrong, I love mountains too, but flat states are by no means ugly or boring. I think flat has several advantages, such as in Florida everything is more green as everything is closer to the water level. Flat also makes it easier to run and bike, as well as driving is easier. Plus IMO it makes everything feel large (don't ask me why, it just does to me).

So again I ask, what is wrong with states being flat or mostly flat?
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Old 10-30-2013, 01:39 PM
 
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I see nothing wrong with it.
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Old 10-30-2013, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Georgia
485 posts, read 730,776 times
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There are problems usually associated with flat states, but there are also problems with mountainous and hilly states so it's basically take your pick. Problems with flat states seem to be: sprawl, less varied architecture, tornadoes, and windy to name a few. I won't go into problems with the mountainous because you asked about flat states.
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Old 10-30-2013, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Upper East Side of Texas
12,521 posts, read 23,098,260 times
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Flat states pros:

- Easier on your transportation (feet, car, bicycle, rail, etc.)

- Beautiful horizons & some of the most amazing thunderstorms across the plains states

- Usually on or close to an ocean (Gulf Coast states)

Flat states cons:

- Flooding

- Lack of sports such as skiing & hiking

- Can get monotonous over time
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Old 10-30-2013, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Miss Jankins (Say nothing bad).
1,235 posts, read 1,426,080 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhans123 View Post
There are problems usually associated with flat states, but there are also problems with mountainous and hilly states so it's basically take your pick. Problems with flat states seem to be: sprawl, less varied architecture, tornadoes, and windy to name a few. I won't go into problems with the mountainous because you asked about flat states.
Atlanta says hello!

I grew up in a flat state: Illinois. Other than not being aesthetically pleasing, relatively speaking, there's nothing wrong with a flat terrain. It's easier to mow the lawn, shovel, the snow, run, bike, etc. When you do find a hill, it makes for great sledding in the winter or rolling down that bad boy in the summer!

I walk/run at Dresden park, here in Atlanta. It's very aesthetically pleasing. It's quite peaceful. However, I'd hate to be the one that has to mow the lawn, rider or not.
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Old 10-30-2013, 02:15 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,217 posts, read 17,948,587 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhans123 View Post
There are problems usually associated with flat states, but there are also problems with mountainous and hilly states so it's basically take your pick. Problems with flat states seem to be: sprawl, less varied architecture, tornadoes, and windy to name a few. I won't go into problems with the mountainous because you asked about flat states.
The biggest problem with mountainous states is that building and maintaining infrastructure is a lot more expensive. Every new highway and rail line requires extensive grading and excavation; bridges are more numerous and have longer spans, and tunnels are necessary. Storm sewers have to have expanded capacity in low-lying areas, and the distances for everything become longer with every ascent, descent and curve.

It's also much easier to get disoriented and lose your sense of direction. For most of my life, I thought the house I lived in in the Pittsburgh area had a front door that faced south, but after finding the old house on Wikimapia a couple of years ago, I realized that the front door faced west, and all the hills and other houses I saw from my bedroom window that I thought were to the northwest were actually to the northeast.
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Old 10-30-2013, 02:25 PM
 
14,111 posts, read 22,747,327 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FloridaPirate355 View Post
I often see people knock down states like Florida, Texas (though Texas does have some mountains and Florida has some hills), Louisiana, Georgia etc...and I just don't understand why? I mean don't get me wrong, I love mountains too, but flat states are by no means ugly or boring. I think flat has several advantages, such as in Florida everything is more green as everything is closer to the water level. Flat also makes it easier to run and bike, as well as driving is easier. Plus IMO it makes everything feel large (don't ask me why, it just does to me).

So again I ask, what is wrong with states being flat or mostly flat?
Don't group GA, and TX in with Florida. North Georgia is one of the most mountainous regions of the South. And Texas is only flat when people bring up "how much of a percentage of West Texas is flat" argument. Outside of that, Texas has 3 legit regions of HIGH Mountainous areas and HIGH elevation(The Hill Country, Llano Estacado, and the Big Bend Area). Texas is far from flat. Georgia and Texas shouldn't be grouped with Florida. Florida has to fight this battle by it's self. lol
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Old 10-30-2013, 02:29 PM
 
14,111 posts, read 22,747,327 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
The biggest problem with mountainous states is that building and maintaining infrastructure is a lot more expensive. Every new highway and rail line requires extensive grading and excavation; bridges are more numerous and have longer spans, and tunnels are necessary. Storm sewers have to have expanded capacity in low-lying areas, and the distances for everything become longer with every ascent, descent and curve.

It's also much easier to get disoriented and lose your sense of direction. For most of my life, I thought the house I lived in in the Pittsburgh area had a front door that faced south, but after finding the old house on Wikimapia a couple of years ago, I realized that the front door faced west, and all the hills and other houses I saw from my bedroom window that I thought were to the northwest were actually to the northeast.
Whoa. I never realized how disorienting living in a hilly environment could be.
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Old 10-30-2013, 02:34 PM
 
1,214 posts, read 1,390,514 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polo89 View Post
Don't group GA, and TX in with Florida. North Georgia is one of the most mountainous regions of the South. And Texas is only flat when people bring up "how much of a percentage of West Texas is flat" argument. Outside of that, Texas has 3 legit regions of HIGH Mountainous areas and HIGH elevation(The Hill Country, Llano Estacado, and the Big Bend Area). Texas is far from flat. Georgia and Texas shouldn't be grouped with Florida. Florida has to fight this battle by it's self. lol
I know Texas and Georgia are not all flat, neither is Florida. This thread is not really about Florida, or Texas or Georgia for that matter. It's just about people acting like flat places are bad or ugly etc...
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Old 10-30-2013, 03:30 PM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,488 posts, read 16,148,250 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
It's also much easier to get disoriented and lose your sense of direction. For most of my life, I thought the house I lived in in the Pittsburgh area had a front door that faced south, but after finding the old house on Wikimapia a couple of years ago, I realized that the front door faced west, and all the hills and other houses I saw from my bedroom window that I thought were to the northwest were actually to the northeast.
I guess that's possible in Pittsburgh because you so rarely see the sun.
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