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Old 11-03-2013, 07:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
So, the North End of Boston is 90% Italian, (1/3rd of a square mile) and literally 1 block away is Chinatown with 90% Chinese people. The Northend has more in common with Saugus than Chinatown, despit geographic proximity. Or even old South Boston has more in common with Hingham than The North End. South Boston, The North End and Chniatown are all distinct communities like small town but in the city.
Hingham and Saugusare are just outside of Boston, so of course they will be similar to Bostonites, but Bostonites will have more in common with people from LA, NYC, Chicago, DC, London, Moscow, or Paris, than they will with people from small rural towns. Aside from nationality, where is the similarity that you see?
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Old 11-03-2013, 09:48 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
People say they are so different, but really, I don't think they are.
No one really lives in New York, Boston, or San Francisco, they live in Tribeca, Mission Hill, or Nob Hill, what are the population of that neighborhood? 10,000, 15,000? How often does someone in Tribeca actually see someone from Flushings or Hyde park someone from Bunker Hill?
Everyone lives on a Human scale, and that's not 1,000,000, its like 15-25K.
Look at the votes in the Mayoral primaries in Boston, even the last place candidates racked up 60-70% of the vote in their area of the City of Boston, because it is a patchwork of independent places, not as mixed as people want to think.
Those areas aren't "small towns". They're neighborhoods within large cities. Someone living in Tribeca lives in New York City, and it's obvious even if the neighborhood only has 10,000 people (pulled that number out of thin air for the purpose of my argument btw).
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Old 11-03-2013, 10:43 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
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In the Baltimore area, each suburb and city neighborhood does feel like their own small towns, though there IS a lot of commuting and socializing outside your neighborhood due to proximity. In the Washington DC area, each suburb really melts into the next and there is no sense of community at all. In the DC area many people do not really know their neighbors, or even see them much.

And culture is still different. I doubt that in Tribeca people always run into people they know when they go to the grocery store and I don't think a lifelong Tribecan would go into the local convenience store and know the owner cause he's their friend's brother from high school, and know that he led the football team to the state finals in 1985, etc etc. People in Tribeca would also go shopping and partying in Times Square and other parts of New York City vs hang out at the local bar where you know everyone. I personally prefer living a smaller town, particularly in a southern setting, though I like visiting the big city once in a while.

The thing is I can spend months and months in a small city before feeling the urge to visit the big city. But 4 days in the big city and I'm ready to leave......
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Old 11-04-2013, 09:02 AM
 
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I think that some small towns can feel like city neighborhoods, but only if it the towns run concurrently or are bunched together to where you don't know where one ends and/or begins. There may be a difference in terms of population density though.
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Old 11-04-2013, 09:19 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
No one really lives in New York, Boston, or San Francisco, they live in Tribeca, Mission Hill, or Nob Hill, what are the population of that neighborhood? 10,000, 15,000? How often does someone in Tribeca actually see someone from Flushings or Hyde park someone from Bunker Hill?
I can see what you're saying, but this depends greatly on whether you walk everywhere (urban lifestyle) or drive often.

In a highly populated metro area, you will meet far more people from different places over the course of time. That is quite different from small town living.
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Old 11-04-2013, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Center City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
In Big Cities, they sub-divide themselves into 15-20,000 people groups anyhow, Look at Manhattan, 1,100,000 people, but people's "town" where people know many other people, is not Manhattan but TriBeca, Chinatown, Marble Hill, FiDi, Chelsea etc. Most small towns are similar in they know most people in their town, the relationship between say Two close small towns is similar to TriBeca and Williamsburg.
The difference is that people who live in these neighborhoods have access to all that NYC has to offer. They are not limited to their own 'hood. Do you really think someone with an apartment in TriBeca leads a life similar to someone living in a small town in Kansas? I grew up in a small town of 5000 folks and lived in Boston, KC and Houston prior to my current home in Philly. The difference between the small town I grew up in and these cities is night and day. Small towns do not offer the level and variety of restaurants, of culture, of educational opportunities, of shopping, of medical treatment, of social networks . . . Need I go on?

Another major difference is diversity. In typical small towns, one is not likely to encounter people of different backgrounds who have made their way to the city. Cities generally offer much greater professional opportunity than small towns and one is therefore more likely to meet people with a higher level of education in cities, along with people who have lived all over the world.

Cities allow one to seek out one's community. In a large city, people "outside the norm" have more options to find like-minded folks to hang with. If you don't fit in in a small town - too bad. Finally, in small towns, everyone pretty much knows everyone's business. In a city, this is not possible.

OP - have you ever lived in a small town?
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Old 11-04-2013, 12:26 PM
 
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In dense cities you get those 15,000 people in a small fraction of land area, and people are more inclined to walk places, have corner stores everywhere and live in large buildings with a lot of units and take advantage of the millions of people and things to do that are just steps away in another neighborhood. That's a far cry from a small town with empty streets and a few blocks of spread out houses and then nothing for miles after that.

I live in a neighborhood of 95,000 that's packed in within 3 square miles. That's as many people who lived in the entire metro area I grew up in living in around 20 square miles.

They're NOTHING alike as far as the bulit environment and the normal lifestyle within each. My neighborhood has hundreds of restaurants and hundreds of stores lining the streets. There are tons of gay bars, sports bars, a few transit lines, a dozen bus lines, movie theatres, live theatres, and on and on and on. Growing up the hubs of town were Wal-Mart and a movie theatre.


You'll see more people in Tribeca in an hour than you'd probably see in 3 days in a small town.
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Old 11-04-2013, 04:34 PM
 
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Very different. IMO big cities hit "critical mass" a lot when it comes to things like culture, quality of amenities, social interactions, variety of experiences, etc. to the point where global big cities have more in common with each other than smaller cities in their own country or even region
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Old 11-04-2013, 04:50 PM
 
Location: sumter
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big difference between small town life and big city life, its like night and day. small towns don't have all the amenities and convenience of a big city and the pace of life is much slower. however, small town life today isn't what it was 30 or 40 years ago in most places. things like the internet, social media, cell phones, and cars have all played a small part in closing the gap. by way of the internet you have access to shopping for just about anything you can think of, social media connects you to people from around the world, and your car can take you to these places. I have everything I need in my city of 40,000 and most of what I want and anything I cant find here I can get it off line. charlotte is a few hours away, Atlanta is five hours and I can get to d.c. in six. I lived in several big cities nyc and Chicago just to name a few and I had great times in both but there was always no place like home. whenever I would leave the lights of the big city to go home for a visit I cant stop hearing the theme song from cheers. lol
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Old 11-04-2013, 05:29 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
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You don't realize the size of where you live until you move around. I grew up in LA and recently moved to Seattle. While Seattle isn't a small city by any measure, I instantly feel how much smaller the metropolitan area is, mostly when it comes to things to do and see.

In LA, on the weekend, I could go to an unlimited amount of places and districts for pleasure. The entertainment options are limitless. In Seattle... not so much. The entertainment options are exhausted within a year at most.

But entertainment set aside, the quality of life is something worth consideration. As I plan to raise a family within the next few years, Seattle is the superior choice for me.
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