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Old 11-09-2013, 07:13 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
Mine were all from the Palatinate Region other than two who came from the German speaking part of Switzerland. They all arrived in America in the 1700s at Pennsylvania, moved south into North Carolina, and then into Kentucky (by then ethnically mixed) I'm only 10% or so German though.

people love to claim german and irish ancestry as they are more recent, but they Ignore the large colonial British Isles stock they have. British Isles ancestry is far more common than any other ancestry in the US ( german, Irish and Italian included).
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Old 11-09-2013, 07:56 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Traveler86 View Post
people love to claim german and irish ancestry as they are more recent, but they Ignore the large colonial British Isles stock they have. British Isles ancestry is far more common than any other ancestry in the US ( german, Irish and Italian included).
Or they have little or no colonial ancestry.
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Old 11-09-2013, 08:13 PM
 
Location: One of the 13 original colonies.
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Bremen in Northern Germany. That's where my family came from.
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Old 11-09-2013, 08:57 PM
 
Location: USA
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Essen; my great great grandparents came from there to Ohio in the 1850s.
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Old 11-09-2013, 09:32 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Or they have little or no colonial ancestry.

Most have, there have been done studies of american populations of 23andme ancestry and most white americans lean much closer to the British plot results than to the german ones.

Colonial british ancestry is by far the commonest and most widespread ancestry among white americans.

I find It hard to believe there is more german ancestry than British, British must be by far the commonest and overlooked ancestry in the US, because Its also of older origin people tend to not report it, unlike the Irish, german and Italian.


I found in a forum that response which made a lot of sense to me

"The English are so assimilated into America that I'm sure there are millions of people that have long ago stopped identifying themselves as English, but can trace their ancestry back there. Now they just simply see themselves as American"

Or this other

"People are more likely to know about German ancestry than about English ancestry. It is far easier to identify with the most recent immigrants -- especially if those define your culture.

Until I took genealogy seriously and started examining records I thought that I was more German than anything else with much Irish ancestry. Many of the "Germans" are really Swiss, and the "Irish" are Scots-Irish. The English and Welsh parts are bigger than I thought -- a majority. Maternal grandparents that I thought were completely German as were about half English."


I think most americans dont even know their ancestries to begin with.

Last edited by Traveler86; 11-09-2013 at 09:46 PM..
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Old 11-09-2013, 09:49 PM
 
Location: Keizer, OR
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My grandfather was born in a village near Erfurt, Germany, in 1921. He and his family mmigrated to Connecticut around age 10. However my grandfather's family is more Prussian and has a lot of ethnic Polish blood. My aunt traced his side of the family back to the Radziwill noble family in Poland.
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Old 11-09-2013, 11:01 PM
 
Location: Shaw.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Traveler86 View Post
Most have, there have been done studies of american populations of 23andme ancestry and most white americans lean much closer to the British plot results than to the german ones.
Do you have any names of those studies so I can look them up?

Quote:
Colonial british ancestry is by far the commonest and most widespread ancestry among white americans.

I find It hard to believe there is more german ancestry than British, British must be by far the commonest and overlooked ancestry in the US, because Its also of older origin people tend to not report it, unlike the Irish, german and Italian.
Tautology is tautological.

Quote:
I think most americans dont even know their ancestries to begin with.
I think most Americans do know their ancestries to a large extent.
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Old 11-10-2013, 05:46 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Traveler86 View Post
Most have, there have been done studies of american populations of 23andme ancestry and most white americans lean much closer to the British plot results than to the german ones.

Colonial british ancestry is by far the commonest and most widespread ancestry among white americans.

I find It hard to believe there is more german ancestry than British, British must be by far the commonest and overlooked ancestry in the US, because Its also of older origin people tend to not report it, unlike the Irish, german and Italian.
As to the bolded, sounds unlikely outside the south. Well, maybe 1/4 colonial or something.

It's really easy to know how much of your colonial ancestry or more recent. I know up to 1/8 of mine has been in the country from colonial times, the recent is definitely from more recent immigrant. I assume the 1/8 is English.

Also, you're on the wrong thread. This thread is where German American immigranted from.
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Old 11-10-2013, 05:51 AM
 
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Mine ancestors came from Gelsenkierchen mainly and throughout the United States.
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Old 11-10-2013, 06:40 AM
Status: "Nobody's right if everybody's wrong" (set 24 days ago)
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Traveler86 View Post
Most have, there have been done studies of american populations of 23andme ancestry and most white americans lean much closer to the British plot results than to the german ones.

Colonial british ancestry is by far the commonest and most widespread ancestry among white americans.

I find It hard to believe there is more german ancestry than British, British must be by far the commonest and overlooked ancestry in the US, because Its also of older origin people tend to not report it, unlike the Irish, german and Italian.



I think most americans dont even know their ancestries to begin with.
I do a lot of arm chair genealogy for myself and other people. I did my ex's - she being an average "German Cincinnatian". She was about 3/4ths German but also had Dutch, Irish, and a lot of English too.

Americans tend to have a "Check one box" mentality on race and ethnicity. Given the tremendous rates of intermarriage among Euro ethnic groups, not just now but since colonization started, unless you're second generation American you're probably of mixed ancestry. My fiance has an ancestor in the 1600s who was half Scottish, a quarter Dutch, and a quarter Italian. Which box should she have checked? LOL I have at least 7 ancestral groups - in order of commonality: English, Scottish, (plus Scotch Irish), Welsh, German, Dutch, French, and 1/64th Cherokee - and I feel to pick just one group for my "ancestry" would be an insult to the other 6.

People who claim "American" ancestry on their census forms have long been mocked as ignorant when they were the only ones answering correctly in the first place. Of course I would prefer more factual choices like "Mixed Western European", etc.
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