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Old 11-08-2013, 08:07 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
What about Seattle city? Then, what about King County suburbs? Seattle and King County aren't synonymous. Seattle's median household income is lower than King County's household median income.
If there are less children, that will raise per capita income all things being equal. Children add no (or very little) income while increasing the number of people divided by. But if you have more one person households, that'll reduce household income
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Old 11-08-2013, 08:08 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
Would you argue that Manhattan is more working class than Staten Island?
No, but note Manhattan has a far higher poverty rate than Staten Island.
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Old 11-08-2013, 08:40 PM
 
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King County suburbs that are clearly more "working class" than Seattle proper:

White Center (pop. 13,495) 12.7% college degrees, per capita income: $19,323
Boulevard Park (pop. 5,287) 14.5%, $20,146
SeaTac (pop. 27,667) 14.6%, $22,020
Riverton (pop. 6,407) 16.4%, $22,285
Tukwila (pop. 19,611) 18.8%, $21,096
Lakeland North (pop. 12,942) 20.9%, $31,055
Des Moines (pop. 30,449) 21.4%, $30,364
Auburn (pop. 73,505) 21.9%, $27,212
Lakeland South (pop. 11,574) 22.5%, $30,831
Covington (pop. 17,575) 23%, $32,802
Kent (pop. 122,999) 25.3%, $26,180
Federal Way (pop. 91,933) 25.4%, $26,514
Burien (pop. 49,410) 26.5%, $30,983
Lake Morton-Berrydale (pop. 10,160) 28.1%, $36,962
Bryn Mawr-Skyway CDP (pop. 15,645) 28.4%, $28,252
Renton (pop. 95,448) 30.3%, $31,121
East Renton Highlands (pop. 11,494) 33%, $36,252
Bothell West (pop. 16,607) 33.9%, $33,621
Fairwood (pop. 19,102) 39.1%, $38,624
Shoreline (pop. 54,352) 43%, $34,884


Affluent King County suburbs:

Mercer Island (pop. 23,661) 74.7%, $76,619
Sammamish (pop. 49,069) 69.6%, $53,423
Union Hill-Novelty Hill (pop. 18,805) 63.2%, $60,302
Bellevue (pop. 126,439) 60.7%, $46,943
Issaquah (pop. 32,633) 60.5%, $47,351
Redmond (pop. 56,561) 60.2%, $46,748
Lake Forest Park (pop. 12,972) 59.7%, $49,414
Cottage Lake (pop. 22,494) 58.6%, $54,430
Kirkland (pop. 50,697) 57.6%, $53,792


I've excluded a few far-flung communities and places under 5000, as well as a few borderline cases. 705,000 people live in King County suburbs that have lower per capita incomes and lower proportion of college graduates than the city of Seattle, vs. 393,000 in what can be called affluent suburbs.

Lynwood, Edmonds and Milton (shared by King and Pierce counties) should probably be labelled Seattle suburbs but were excluded.
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Old 11-08-2013, 08:44 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
If there are less children, that will raise per capita income all things being equal. Children add no (or very little) income while increasing the number of people divided by. But if you have more one person households, that'll reduce household income
Good points and the first point hurts the suburbs, while the second point hurts Seattle in that regard.
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Old 11-08-2013, 08:55 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
King County suburbs that are clearly more "working class" than Seattle proper:

White Center (pop. 13,495) 12.7% college degrees, per capita income: $19,323
Boulevard Park (pop. 5,287) 14.5%, $20,146
SeaTac (pop. 27,667) 14.6%, $22,020
Riverton (pop. 6,407) 16.4%, $22,285
Tukwila (pop. 19,611) 18.8%, $21,096
Lakeland North (pop. 12,942) 20.9%, $31,055
Des Moines (pop. 30,449) 21.4%, $30,364
Auburn (pop. 73,505) 21.9%, $27,212
Lakeland South (pop. 11,574) 22.5%, $30,831
Covington (pop. 17,575) 23%, $32,802
Kent (pop. 122,999) 25.3%, $26,180
Federal Way (pop. 91,933) 25.4%, $26,514
Burien (pop. 49,410) 26.5%, $30,983
Lake Morton-Berrydale (pop. 10,160) 28.1%, $36,962
Bryn Mawr-Skyway CDP (pop. 15,645) 28.4%, $28,252
Renton (pop. 95,448) 30.3%, $31,121
East Renton Highlands (pop. 11,494) 33%, $36,252
Bothell West (pop. 16,607) 33.9%, $33,621
Fairwood (pop. 19,102) 39.1%, $38,624
Shoreline (pop. 54,352) 43%, $34,884


Affluent King County suburbs:

Mercer Island (pop. 23,661) 74.7%, $76,619
Sammamish (pop. 49,069) 69.6%, $53,423
Union Hill-Novelty Hill (pop. 18,805) 63.2%, $60,302
Bellevue (pop. 126,439) 60.7%, $46,943
Issaquah (pop. 32,633) 60.5%, $47,351
Redmond (pop. 56,561) 60.2%, $46,748
Lake Forest Park (pop. 12,972) 59.7%, $49,414
Cottage Lake (pop. 22,494) 58.6%, $54,430
Kirkland (pop. 50,697) 57.6%, $53,792


I've excluded a few far-flung communities and places under 5000, as well as a few borderline cases. 705,000 people live in King County suburbs that have lower per capita incomes and lower proportion of college graduates than the city of Seattle, vs. 393,000 in what can be called affluent suburbs.

Lynwood, Edmonds and Milton (shared by King and Pierce counties) should probably be labelled Seattle suburbs but were excluded.
Can you post median household income as well? Something else to keep in mind is that about 30% of adults 25 and over have at least a Bachelors degree in the US and about 32% in the state of Washington.
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Old 11-08-2013, 09:09 PM
 
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Seattle Rest of King Co.
Management, business, arts and science occupations 53.7% 44.5%
Service occupations 15.3 14.4
Sales and office occupations 20.4 23.6
Natural resources, construction and maintenance occs. 4.3 7.4
Production, transportation and material moving occs. 6.3 9.9

MBAS is basically managers and professionals (who make up the majority of the Seattle workforce), with Seattle running nearly 10 points ahead of the remainder of King County. One point higher in terms of service workers (not surprising given the higher poverty level) but quite a bit behind in the other categories. About a quarter of Seattle could be said to be blue collar workers vs. nearly a third in the rest of the county.



American FactFinder

Last edited by King of Kensington; 11-08-2013 at 09:40 PM..
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Old 11-09-2013, 07:18 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
Seattle Rest of King Co.
Management, business, arts and science occupations 53.7% 44.5%
Service occupations 15.3 14.4
Sales and office occupations 20.4 23.6
Natural resources, construction and maintenance occs. 4.3 7.4
Production, transportation and material moving occs. 6.3 9.9

MBAS is basically managers and professionals (who make up the majority of the Seattle workforce), with Seattle running nearly 10 points ahead of the remainder of King County. One point higher in terms of service workers (not surprising given the higher poverty level) but quite a bit behind in the other categories. About a quarter of Seattle could be said to be blue collar workers vs. nearly a third in the rest of the county.



American FactFinder
This still doesn't explain the crossover in economic terms. I would think that would be the more important metric and American metros in general just have a degree of crossover economically between the city and suburbs. I get the size of households and children aspects, but you may also have a swath of suburbs with similar results to those in Seattle. It would be like the old city of Toronto having metrics similar to Seattle, but say Mississauga and Bellevue/adjacent suburbs having similar metrics to those cities.

Also, what could actually skew Seattle's poverty rate are off campus students, which are added to poverty rate numbers.

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 11-09-2013 at 07:50 AM..
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Old 11-09-2013, 09:09 AM
 
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Toronto is similar to Seattle in that regard. The Old City of Toronto has a per capita income and higher proportion of university graduates and professionals than the GTA as a whole, but still has a higher poverty rate and lower median HH income. So less working class but with a higher number of people with low incomes.
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Old 11-09-2013, 09:27 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,110,497 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
Toronto is similar to Seattle in that regard. The Old City of Toronto has a per capita income and higher proportion of university graduates and professionals than the GTA as a whole, but still has a higher poverty rate and lower median HH income. So less working class but with a higher number of people with low incomes.
What about the new (consolidated) city of Toronto vs the suburbs?
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Old 11-09-2013, 10:19 AM
 
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Have to look but my guess is per capita incomes would be about the GTA average and the percentage of university graduates a bit higher. Problem is the 2011 census in Canada is garbage thanks to the mandatory long form being replaced by a voluntary National Household Survey which is problematic especially for incomes.
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